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Current Malaria News and Events, Malaria News Articles.
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Big data takes aim at a big human problem
A James Cook University scientist is part of an international team that's used new 'big data' analysis to achieve a major advance in understanding neurological disorders such as Epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. (2019-03-12)
To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets
Researchers found that they could use the same drug -- atovaquone -- used to treat the malaria parasite when a person gets sick, coat mosquito bed nets with it, and let mosquitoes ingest the anti-malarial drug. (2019-03-11)
Anti-malarial shows promise in human clinical study
An experimental drug, called DSM265, cured seven volunteers of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, a malaria parasite that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. (2019-03-11)
Tissue model reveals how RNA will act on the liver
MIT researchers have shown an engineered model of human liver tissue can be used to investigate nucleic acid-based therapies, such as RNA interference, before testing them in patients. (2019-03-05)
New research suggests earlier emergence of malaria in Africa
After carrying out extensive research into the βS mutation by performing full sequencing of the HBB gene together with a large-scale genomic study on 479 individuals from 13 populations from Sub-Saharan Africa, scientists were able to reveal that malaria emerged in Africa at least 20,000 years ago - and not at the same time as the adoption of agriculture 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. (2019-02-28)
Medicating mosquitoes to fight malaria
Mosquitoes that landed on surfaces coated with the anti-malarial compound atovaquone were completely blocked from developing Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-02-27)
Improved outlook for people of African descent with treatment-resistant schizophrenia
A study led by researchers at Cardiff University means that more people of African descent who have treatment-resistant schizophrenia could be safely given the drug best proven to manage their symptoms. (2019-02-26)
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Experts warn of a surge in vector-borne diseases as humanitarian crisis in Venezuela worsens
The ongoing humanitarian crisis in Venezuela is accelerating the re-emergence of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease, dengue, and Zika virus, and threatens to jeopardize public health gains in the country over the past two decades, warn leading public health experts. (2019-02-21)
Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago
The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually. (2019-02-11)
Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. (2019-02-08)
Genome structure of malaria parasites linked to virulence
An international research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology has found that malaria parasite genomes are shaped by parasite-specific gene families, and that this genome organization strongly correlates with the parasite's virulence. (2019-02-04)
Male birth control for the malaria parasite
Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease. (2019-01-31)
New research framework may help better understand, predict infectious disease risks
University of South Florida-led research identifies individual hosts more or less likely to escalate outbreaks. (2019-01-29)
New vaccine offers fresh take on malaria fight
Early research on a new approach to protecting against malaria is offering promising, potentially long-lasting results against the persistent parasite that sickens hundreds of millions people each year. (2019-01-23)
To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed
Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest. (2019-01-22)
New study raises hopes of eradication of malaria
After major global successes in the battle against malaria, the positive trend stalled around 2015 -- apart from in Zanzibar in East Africa, where only a fraction of the disease remains. (2019-01-21)
Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time
A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher. (2019-01-16)
Study: 'Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies
'Our aim,' the authors write, 'is therefore to use our collective experiences and knowledge to highlight how the current debate about gene drives could benefit from lessons learned from other contexts and sound communication approaches involving multiple actors.' (2019-01-14)
Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
A team at LSTM with their collaborators in Malawi and Denmark have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria. (2019-01-11)
Danish malaria vaccine passes test in humans
A vaccine against fatal pregnancy malaria shows promising results in the first tests in humans. (2019-01-10)
Pyronaridine-artesunate for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria
Researchers from LSTM have looked at the efficacy of using a novel artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), pyronaridine-artesunate, to treat malaria in areas where resistance to other ACTs is becoming a problem. (2019-01-08)
Singapore researchers develop gold-complexed ferrocenyl phosphines as potent antimalarials
A team of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed novel ferrocene-based molecules that impair the malaria parasite's metabolic function leading to parasite death. (2018-12-19)
Killing the liver-stage malaria parasite with baculovirus: a drug discovery approach
Currently, few antimalarial treatments exist that effectively kill liver-stage malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax, which can lay dormant for months or even years. (2018-12-12)
Simple and rapid test for Ebola diagnosis could improve outbreak control
David Sebba and colleagues have created a point-of-care diagnostic test that, in fewer than 30 minutes, distinguishes Ebola infections from other endemic diseases that share similar initial symptoms, such as Lassa fever and malaria. (2018-12-12)
Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. (2018-12-11)
Pregnant women, young children most likely to use bed nets to prevent malaria
When households in sub-Saharan Africa don't have an adequate number of insecticide-treated bed nets, pregnant women and children under five are the most likely family members to sleep under the ones they have, leaving men and school-aged children more exposed to malaria, new Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) research suggests. (2018-12-11)
Half a million tests and many mosquitoes later, new buzz about a malaria prevention drug
Researchers spent two years testing chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the malaria parasite at an earlier stage in its lifecycle than most current drugs, revealing a new set of chemical starting points for the first drugs to prevent malaria instead of just treating the symptoms. (2018-12-06)
Sickle cell anemia treatment safely lowers disease burden in African children
A daily hydroxyurea pill may bring relief for children living with the painful and deadly blood disease sickle cell anemia (SCA) in resource-challenged sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is prevalent and health care is suboptimal. (2018-12-01)
Latest Cochrane review looks at pyrethroid-PBO nets for preventing malaria in Africa
Researchers from LSTM have confirmed that using pyrethroid-PBO treated nets to prevent malaria is more effective at killing mosquitoes in areas where there is a high level of resistance to pyrethroids. (2018-11-29)
BU study: Modified malaria drug proven effective at inhibiting Ebola
Robert Davey, professor of microbiology at Boston University School of Medicine and researcher at Boston University's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL), discovered that certain derivatives of amodiaquine, a medication typically used to treat malaria, could provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients infected with Ebola virus disease by blocking the viruses from entering cells. (2018-11-28)
A new aspect in Plasmodium falciparum life cycle revealed: 'Express' sexual conversion
Conversion from the asexual to the sexual phase of the malaria parasite is necessary for its transmission to the mosquito. (2018-11-26)
Blood-sucking flies have been spreading malaria for 100 million years
The microorganisms that cause malaria, leishmaniasis and a variety of other illnesses today can be traced back at least to the time of dinosaurs, a study of amber-preserved blood-sucking insects and ticks show. (2018-11-26)
Disrupting parasites' family planning could aid malaria fight
Malaria parasites know good times from bad and plan their offspring accordingly, scientists have found, in a development that could inform new treatments. (2018-11-15)
Protection against Malaria: A matter of balance
A balanced production of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines at two years of age protects against clinical malaria in early childhood, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. (2018-11-14)
Artificial intelligence to accelerate malaria research
Insilico Taiwan, a Taipei-based subsidiary of Insilico Medicine, publishes a new research paper titled 'In Silico Study Reveals How E64 Approaches, Binds to, and Inhibits Falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum that Causes Malaria in Humans' in Scientific Reports. (2018-11-12)
Scientists propose panel to guide gene-editing decisions regarding conservation
Scientists from 10 universities say an international oversight panel is needed to guide decisions about whether and when to employ gene-editing technology to solve ecological problems. (2018-11-05)
Editing nature: A call for careful oversight of environmental gene editing
Writing in Science, an interdisciplinary team led by Yale researchers makes the case for a new global governance to assure a neutral and informed evaluation of the potential benefits and risks of gene editing. (2018-11-01)
Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life
Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). (2018-11-01)
A study identifies new markers associated with protection by the RTS,S malaria vaccine
Protection conferred by the RTS,S malaria vaccine depends greatly on the amount and subclass of antibodies generated upon vaccination, and on previous exposure levels to the parasite, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. (2018-10-30)
New study reports dogs successfully diagnosed malaria by sniffing socks worn by African children
As the global battle against malaria stalls, scientists may be adding a novel tool to the fight: sniffer dogs. (2018-10-29)
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