Current Male Infertility News and Events | Page 25

Current Male Infertility News and Events, Male Infertility News Articles.
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Delivery rates in IVF are affected by the age of the male partner
A few studies have found that the chance of natural conception can be affected by the age of the male partner, particularly in the genetic health of sperm cells, but the celebrity examples of Charlie Chaplin or Luciano Pavarotti have kept alive the notion that male fertility goes on forever. Now, a new study from the USA in IVF couples shows quite clearly that live birth outcome is clearly affected by the age of the male partner. (2017-07-02)

Variation at a central metabolic gene influences male fruit fly lifespan
The overexpression of an important gene that regulates energy metabolism can cause a severe shortening of lifespan in male fruit flies but has only a small negative effect on lifespans of female fruit flies, according to new research from North Carolina State University. (2017-06-29)

Male infertility could be linked to noisy bedrooms, study suggests
Long-term exposure to a noisy environment, particularly at night, is linked to infertility in men, according to a study in Environmental Pollution. The researchers found that exposure above the WHO night noise level (55 dB -- equivalent to the noise of a suburban street) is linked to a significant increase in infertility. (2017-06-28)

Mixed results on effectiveness of acupuncture to treat stress urinary incontinence, infertility
Electroacupuncture improved stress urinary incontinence -- that's when a woman can experience an involuntary loss of urine such as when sneezing or coughing -- but acupuncture did not increase the likelihood of childbirth among women with infertility, according to two studies published by JAMA. (2017-06-27)

Acupuncture may not be effective in treating infertility
Acupuncture, alone or with the medication clomiphene, does not appear to be effective in treating infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to an international team of researchers. The finding casts doubts on previous smaller trials that have suggested that acupuncture may improve reproductive function in women affected by infertility. (2017-06-27)

Proteins linked to HIV transmission could actually be beneficial for reproduction
Protein fragments found in semen, and previously only known for their ability to enhance HIV infection, also appear to play an important role in reproductive biology. A team of researchers from the Gladstone Institutes, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and Ulm University in Germany discovered that these fragments could help dispose of damaged or unneeded sperm. (2017-06-27)

UC biologist looks at butterflies to help solve human infertility
UC biologist helps decode the structural complexities of male butterfly ejaculate and co-evolving female reproductive tract. Findings from these biochemical relationships may help unlock certain mysteries of human infertility. (2017-06-27)

The trouble with being a handsome bird
Male birds often use brightly coloured plumage to be attractive to females. However, such eye-catching trimmings may also attract unwanted attention from predators. Now, a new study led by Monash University has found that showy males indeed perceive themselves to be at a greater risk of predation. (2017-06-27)

By far, men garner most coveted speaking slots at virology meetings
In their recent study, published in the Journal of Virology, the University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers examined 35 years worth of invited speaker rosters from four prominent virology meetings, including the American Society for Virology, which is hosting its annual meeting in Madison, Wisconsin starting June 24, 2017. They found that men were overwhelmingly represented. For example, between 1982 and 2017, 77 percent of the speakers at ASV's annual meetings were male. (2017-06-23)

Paracetamol during pregnancy can inhibit masculinity
Paracetamol during pregnancy can inhibit masculinity Paracetamol during pregnancy can inhibit the development of 'male behavior' in mice. New research from the University of Copenhagen shows that it can reduce sex drive and aggressive behavior. (2017-06-22)

On polygamous females and single-parent males
On polygamous females and single-parent males Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University are studying plovers Male plovers survive more successfully in the wild than females. Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University have studied how sex biases develop across the life span of the plover. They report on the consequences of the surplus of males for rearing chicks in the research journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences'. (2017-06-22)

Study uncovers link between male hormones and metabolic disease in polycystic ovary syndrome
Scientists from the University of Birmingham have discovered the link between increased male hormones and metabolic complications such as diabetes and fatty liver disease in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). (2017-06-22)

When estimating extinction risk, don't leave out the males
Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as 'noise'. (2017-06-21)

Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. (2017-06-21)

African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive cats
The elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill. (2017-06-21)

Selfish gene acts as both poison and antidote to eliminate competition
Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in collaboration with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center researchers have identified an unprecedented genetic survival strategy that would be right at home in an Agatha Christie murder mystery novel. (2017-06-20)

No evidence of gender bias in philosophy
Despite being a male-dominated field, a recent study found no evidence for gender bias against women in philosophy, in terms of securing tenure-track positions as college professors. So why are there less women in philosophy overall? Some studies show that less women are choosing to major in philosophy at the undergraduate level, and so other factors may be turning them off the discipline at an early stage. (2017-06-20)

Muscle fibers alone can't explain sex differences in bird song
Male birds tend to be better singers than females -- but does the basis for this difference lie in the brain or in the syrinx, their equivalent of our larynx? The researchers behind a new study from The Auk analyzed the muscle fibers in the syrinxes of male and female birds from a range of species and found, to their surprise, that the amount of 'superfast' muscle didn't explain differences in vocal ability between the sexes. (2017-06-14)

Male infertility: Urogenital infection as a possible cause
In couples who have not been able to have children, male infertility is the cause in at least half of cases. In 6-10% the cause is a urogenital infection. The risk of irreversible infertility associated with urogenital infections in men should not be underestimated, say Hans-Christian Schuppe and coauthors in a review article in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017; 114: 321-7). (2017-06-14)

Gender dictates camouflage strategy in this newly identified praying mantis group
Adult females and males in a new genus of Latin American praying mantises have sharply different approaches to camouflage, according to a Cleveland Museum of Natural History-led study in the open access journal ZooKeys. Males retain the stick-like appearance they employ as nymphs, while females morph into a leaf's shape and color. This peculiarity prompted the researchers to name the mantises after Mexican comedian Chespirito, whose catch-phrase was (2017-06-14)

Uterine fibroid embolization helps restore fertility
A minimally invasive treatment can help restore fertility in women with uterine fibroids, according to a new study. (2017-06-13)

Promiscuous salamander found to use genes from three partners equally
A study shows that a unique all-female lineage of salamander equally balances genes from the males of three other salamander species. The findings highlight the bizarre ways some animals reproduce in order to preserve their species. The results were published in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution. (2017-06-12)

Common periodontal pathogen may interfere with conception in women
According to a recent study, a common periodontal pathogen may delay concepcion in young women. (2017-06-12)

Male sexual behavior linked to elevated male sex hormone receptors in muscles of sex-changing fish
Sex-changing fish exhibit differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression in muscles that are highly sensitive to androgens (male sex hormones) and essential for male courtship behavior, according to a Georgia State University study. (2017-06-08)

Does your name match your face?
People tend to associate round names such as 'Bob' and 'Lou' with round-faced individuals, and they have an inherent preference for names and faces that go well together. This is according to David Barton and Jamin Halberstadt of the University of Otago in New Zealand. In the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, published by Springer, they investigated the so-called 'bouba/kiki effect.' (2017-06-08)

Gene therapy leads to long-term benefits in dog model of devastating childhood disease
Researchers who previously showed that a gene therapy treatment could save the lives of dogs with a deadly disease called myotubular myopathy -- a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the skeletal muscles -- have found that the therapy is long-lasting. The results support a clinical trial in patients. (2017-06-07)

Does the sex of a cell matter in research?
A Tulane University endocrinologist co-authored a guide in the latest issue of Cell Metabolism to help scientists who study obesity, diabetes or other metabolic diseases better account for inherent sex differences in research.  (2017-06-06)

Is there a link between infertility and child educational outcomes?
Findings from study co-authored by a University of Illinois at Chicago sociologist suggest that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement -- both test scores and grade point average -- at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own. (2017-06-05)

Breeding pairs of birds cooperate to resist climate change
Most bird chicks need parental care to survive. In biparental species the chicks have greater chances of success if both parents participate in this task, especially under hostile situations. An international team of scientists has revealed that when temperatures rise, males and females in pairs of plovers shift incubation more frequently. (2017-06-05)

Fertility preservation for children with differences of sex development
Article explores unique ethical issues for children with differences of sex development on whether or not they should pursue fertility preservation. (2017-06-02)

Deployment stress impacts well-being through different mental health issues for female and male vets
Experiencing stress-related mental health issues following deployment exposures increases risk of reduced well-being in other life domains in the years following military service for veterans. Gender plays an important role in these associations. The findings, which appear in Clinical Psychological Science, have implications for better understanding the challenges female and male veterans face upon returning from service and may lead to ways care can be optimized with consideration of the role gender may play. (2017-06-01)

How do signs of problem gambling differ in men and women?
Men and women experiencing problems with gaming machines (slot machines) display the same signs that their habit is out of control. However, the two sexes differ in how they handle the distress that accompanies their addiction. These are the findings of researchers at the University of Adelaide, the Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) and Swinburne University of Technology in Australia. The study is published in Springer's Journal of Gambling Studies. (2017-06-01)

Cigarette damage to unborn children revealed in stem cell study
Chemicals found in cigarette smoke have been shown to damage foetal liver cells. Researchers - led by the University of Edinburgh -- have developed a novel way to study the effects of maternal smoking on liver tissue using embryonic stem cells. (2017-05-30)

High-fat diet alters reward system in rats
Exposure to high-fat diet from childhood may increase the sensitivity of the dopamine system later in adulthood, according to a study in male rats published in eNeuro. (2017-05-29)

Darwin was right: Females prefer sex with good listeners
Almost 150 years after Charles Darwin first proposed a little-known prediction from his theory of sexual selection, researchers have found that male moths with larger antennae are better at detecting female signals. (2017-05-26)

CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects
The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health. (2017-05-25)

'Pregnant' housefly males demonstrate the evolution of sex determination
An international team headed up by researchers from the University of Zurich has discovered the gene that determines the male sex in houseflies. Surprisingly, the sex-determining mechanisms are not the same for all houseflies -- they depend on where the insects live. This knowledge not only helps us better understand the evolution of sex determination, but also aids in the control of agricultural pests or carriers of disease. (2017-05-23)

Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding women
A national study of college and university administrators has found that female department chairs, deans and provosts have different attitudes and beliefs than their male counterparts about how to retain women professors in STEM fields. It also supports the assertion that placing women in administrative roles creates greater emphasis on the importance of enacting policies to attract and retain women in STEM. (2017-05-22)

Awareness of controversial Arizona immigration law influenced male students' classroom behavior
US-born Latino male middle school students who had familiarity with a controversial Arizona immigration-enforcement bill had more difficulty exhibiting proper behavior in the classroom, such as following instructions and staying quiet, according to a new study by researchers at Arizona State University and the University of Kansas. (2017-05-22)

Female peer mentors help retain college women in engineering
A new study by social psychologist Nilanjana Dasgupta and her Ph.D. student Tara C. Dennehy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that early in college, young women in engineering majors felt more confident about their ability, a greater sense of belonging in engineering, more motivated and less anxious if they had a female, but not male, peer mentor. (2017-05-22)

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