Current Malware News and Events

Current Malware News and Events, Malware News Articles.
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New cyberattack can trick scientists into making toxins or viruses -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
The researchers found that accessibility and automation of the synthetic gene engineering workflow, combined with insufficient cybersecurity controls, allow malware to interfere with biological processes within the victim's lab, closing the loop with the possibility of an exploit written into a DNA molecule. (2020-11-30)

The Phish scale: NIST's new tool helps IT staff see why users click on fraudulent emails
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new tool called the Phish Scale that could help organizations better train their employees to avoid a particularly dangerous form of cyber attack known as phishing. (2020-09-17)

No honor among cyber thieves
A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online 'carding forums,' illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information. (2020-07-22)

'I saw you were online': How online status indicators shape our behavior
After surveying smartphone users, UW researchers found that many people misunderstand online status indicators but still carefully shape their behavior to control how they are displayed to others. (2020-04-13)

COVID-19 contact tracing apps: 8 privacy questions governments should ask
Imperial experts have posed eight privacy questions governments should consider when developing coronavirus contact tracing apps. (2020-04-02)

Online hate speech could be contained like a computer virus, say Cambridge researchers
Artificial intelligence is being developed that will allow advisory ''quarantining'' of hate speech in a manner akin to malware filters - offering users a way to control exposure to ''hateful content'' without resorting to censorship. (2019-12-18)

Mobile devices blur work and personal privacy raising cyber risks, says QUT researcher
Organisations aren't moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace, warns a QUT privacy researcher. (2019-12-04)

Browser tool aims to help researchers ID malicious websites, code
Researchers have developed an open-source tool that allows users to track and record the behavior of JavaScript programs without alerting the websites that run those programs. The tool, called VisibleV8, runs in the Chrome browser and is designed to detect malicious programs that are capable of evading existing malware detection systems. (2019-10-22)

Tech companies not doing enough to protect users from phishing scams
Just over 15 years after the first reported incident of phishing, new research from the University of Plymouth suggests tech companies could be doing more to protect users from the threat of scams. However, greater awareness of the issue is also needed among individuals and organisations. (2019-07-30)

$4.6 million award creates program to train cybersecurity professionals
A five-year, $4.63 million award from the National Science Foundation will enable a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Arkansas to create a program to recruit, educate and train the next generation of cybersecurity professionals. (2019-07-16)

New computer attack mimics user's keystroke characteristics and evades detection, according to Ben-Gurion University cyber researchers
'Our proposed detection modules are trusted and secured, based on information that can be measured from side-channel resources, in addition to data transmission,' Farhi says. 'These include (1) the keyboard's power consumption; (2) the keystrokes' sound; and (3) the user's behavior associated with his or her ability to respond to typographical errors.' (2019-06-06)

Illinois researchers add 'time-travel' feature to drives to fight ransomware attacks
One of the latest cyber threats involves hackers encrypting user files and then charging ''ransom'' to get them back. In the paper, 'Project Almanac: A Time-Traveling Solid State Drive,' CSL students Chance Coats and Xiaohao Wang and Assistant Professor Jian Huang look at how they can use the commodity storage devices already in a computer, to save the files without having to pay the ransom. (2019-05-29)

Design flaws create security vulnerabilities for 'smart home' internet-of-things devices
NC State researchers find countermeasures for designers of security systems and other smart home devices. (2019-05-02)

New technique uses power anomalies to ID malware in embedded systems
Researchers have developed a technique for detecting types of malware that use a system's architecture to thwart traditional security measures. The new detection approach works by tracking power fluctuations in embedded systems. (2019-04-25)

Better security achieved with randomly generating biological encryption keys
Data breaches, hacked systems and hostage malware are frequently topics of evening news casts -- including stories of department store, hospital, government and bank data leaking into unsavory hands -- but now a team of engineers has an encryption key approach that is unclonable and not reverse-engineerable, protecting information even as computers become faster and nimbler. (2018-12-19)

How a personality trait puts you at risk for cybercrime
Impulse online shopping, downloading music and compulsive email use are all signs of a certain personality trait that make you a target for malware attacks. New research from Michigan State University examines the behaviors -- both obvious and subtle -- that lead someone to fall victim to cybercrime involving Trojans, viruses, and malware. (2018-12-17)

Research finds bots and Russian trolls influenced vaccine discussion on Twitter
Social media bots and Russian trolls promoted discord and spread false information about vaccines on Twitter using tactics similar to those at work during the 2016 United States presidential election, according to new research led by the George Washington University. (2018-08-23)

New malicious email detection method that outperforms 60 antivirus engines -- Ben-Gurion
They compared their detection model to 60 industry-leading antivirus engines as well as previous research, and found their system outperformed the next best antivirus engine by 13 percent -- significantly better than such products including Kaspersky, MacAfee and Avast. (2018-07-19)

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hack
'It only took 30 minutes to find passwords for most of the devices and some of them were found only through a Google search of the brand,' says Omer Shwartz, a Ph.D. student and member of Dr. Oren's lab. 'Once hackers can access an IoT device, like a camera, they can create an entire network of these camera models controlled remotely.' (2018-03-13)

Can your cardiac device be hacked?
Medical devices, including cardiovascular implantable electronic devices could be at risk for hacking. In a paper publishing online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Cardiology's Electrophysiology Council examines the potential risk to patients and outlines how to improve cybersecurity in these devices. (2018-02-20)

Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacks, study shows
Devices used to manage accounts using Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, according to research by University of Edinburgh scientists. (2018-01-23)

First method to detect illicit drone filming developed
'The beauty of this research is that someone using only a laptop and an object that flickers can detect if someone is using a drone to spy on them,' says Ben Nassi, a Ph.D. student in the BGU Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering and a researcher at the BGU Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC). 'While it has been possible to detect a drone, now someone can also tell if it is recording a video of your location or something else.' (2018-01-12)

First white-box testing model finds thousands of errors in self-driving cars
Researchers from Lehigh University and Columbia University shine a light into the black box of deep learning systems with DeepXplore, the first automated white-box testing of such systems. Evaluating DeepXplore on real-world datasets, the researchers were able to expose thousands of unique incorrect corner-case behaviors. They will present their findings at the 2017 biennial ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles (SOSP) conference in Shanghai, China on October 29th in Session I: Bug Hunting. (2017-10-25)

Security cameras are vulnerable to attacks using infrared light -- Ben Gurion U. study
The cyber team led by Dr. Mordechai Guri, head of research and development for BGU's Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC), shows how IR can be used to create a covert communication channel between malware installed on an internal computer network and an attacker located hundreds of yards outside or even miles away with direct line of sight. The attacker can use this channel to send commands and receive response messages. (2017-09-19)

Network traffic provides early indication of malware infection
By analyzing network traffic going to suspicious domains, security administrators could detect malware infections weeks or even months before they're able to capture a sample of the invading malware, a new study suggests. The findings point toward the need for new malware-independent detection strategies that will give network defenders the ability to identify network security breaches in a more timely manner. (2017-05-21)

Combination of features produces new Android vulnerability
A new vulnerability affecting Android mobile devices results not from a traditional bug, but from the malicious combination of two legitimate permissions that power desirable and commonly used features in popular apps. (2017-05-21)

Under cyber attack: UH researchers look at how to catch a 'phisher'
As cybersecurity experts scramble to stop another wave of ransomware and malware scams that have infected computers around the world, computer science experts at the University of Houston are 'phishing' for reasons why these types of attacks are so successful. (2017-05-16)

Weaponizing the internet for terrorism
Writing in the International Journal of Collaborative Intelligence, researchers from Nigeria suggest that botnets and cyber attacks could interfere with infrastructure, healthcare, transportation, and power supply to as devastating an effect as the detonation of explosives of the firing of guns. (2017-05-16)

Android apps can conspire to mine information from your smartphone
'What this study shows undeniably with real-world evidence over and over again is that app behavior, whether it is intentional or not, can pose a security breach depending on the kinds of apps you have on your phone,' said researcher Gang Wang. (2017-04-03)

Desktop scanners can be hijacked to perpetrate cyberattacks
The researchers conducted several demonstrations to transmit a message into computers connected to a flatbed scanner. Using direct laser light sources up to a half-mile (900 meters) away, as well as on a drone outside their office building, the researchers successfully sent a message to trigger malware through the scanner. (2017-03-28)

New technique completely protects internet video from cyberattacks -- Ben-Gurion University study
To counter this emerging threat, Professor Hadar developed a series of algorithms that can completely prevent attackers from being able to infiltrate and extract information through videos or pictures. His techniques combat steganography, a process that involves hiding a message in an appropriate carrier, such as an image file. Utilizing steganography, the carrier can be sent to a receiver without anyone else knowing that it contains a hidden message. (2017-03-13)

Staying a heartbeat ahead of hackers
Nearly a million new forms of malware are unleashed on the world every day. Manufacturers of software for smartphones, laptops and security cameras, as well as banks, retailers and government agencies, release upgrades frequently to try to protect customers and assets. Yet the millions of people with implanted medical devices typically never receive software upgrades to address security vulnerabilities for the gadgets in their bodies. UA engineers are working to change that. (2017-03-08)

Cameras can steal data from computer hard drive LED lights -- Ben-Gurion U. study
The research team utilized the hard-drive (HDD) activity LED lights that are found on most desktop PCs and laptops. The researchers found that once malware is on a computer, it can indirectly control the HDD LED, turning it on and off rapidly (thousands of flickers per second) -- a rate that exceeds the human visual perception capabilities. As a result, highly sensitive information can be encoded and leaked over the fast LED signals, which are received and recorded by remote cameras or light sensors. (2017-02-22)

NTU and FireEye join forces to grow the ranks of Singapore's cyber security experts
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and leading cyber security company FireEye are inking a partnership to explore new areas in cyber security research, and to develop courses to meet the rising demand for cyber security professionals needed to help defend critical networks. (2017-02-14)

Protecting bulk power systems from hackers
Most of us take turning the lights on for granted. In reality, the energy we draw from the electrical grid to brighten homes, freeze food and watch TV is part of a complicated and widespread system. Understanding that system's vulnerabilities and reliability is a crucial step towards improving its security. (2017-02-10)

Your Android device's Pattern Lock can be cracked within 5 attempts
The popular Pattern Lock system used to secure millions of Android phones can be cracked within just five attempts -- and more complicated patterns are the easiest to crack, security experts reveal. (2017-01-23)

Bring your own (security) disaster
Bring your own device (BYOD) to work is common practice these days. Almost everyone has a smart or a tablet and in many office and other jobs, using the device makes workers more effective and more efficient in their work (games and personal social media aside, perhaps). A new study in the International Journal of Teaching and Case Studies suggests, however, that most company IT security managers would prefer employees not to BYOD. (2016-12-14)

Malware that turns PCs into eavesdropping devices demonstrated by Ben-Gurion U.
Headphones, earphones and speakers are physically built like microphones and that an audio port's role in the PC can be reprogrammed from output to input creates a vulnerability that can be abused by hackers. (2016-11-22)

CyLab researchers create network traffic visualization tool to help thwart cyber attacks
Carnegie Mellon CyLab researchers Yang Cai and Sebastian Peryt have created a tool that allows one to visualize network traffic to more easily identify key changes and patterns. The researchers have used this tool to inspect network traffic during DDoS attacks and map out the structure of malware distribution networks. (2016-11-07)

Researchers want to use hardware to fight computer viruses
Fighting computer viruses isn't just for software anymore. Binghamton University researchers will use a grant from the National Science Foundation to study how hardware can help protect computers too. (2016-11-07)

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