Current Mammals News and Events

Current Mammals News and Events, Mammals News Articles.
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New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

Conservation paradox - the pros and cons of recreational hunting
In a new article published in the journal One Earth, scientists from the University of Helsinki in Finland and Flinders University in Australia have reviewed more than 1,000 studies on recreational hunting -- the first such attempt to summarize the scientific literature examining the biodiversity and social effects of recreational hunting globally. (2021-02-19)

The distribution of vertebrate animals redefines temperate and cold climate regions
The distribution of vegetation is routinely used to classify climate regions worldwide, yet whether these regions are relevant to other organisms is unknown. Umeå researchers have established climate regions based on vertebrate species' distributions in a new study published in eLife. They found that while high-energy climate regions are similar across vertebrate and plant groups, there are large differences in temperate and cold climates. (2021-02-18)

Capuchin monkey genome reveals clues to its long life and large brain
An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of a capuchin monkey for the first time, uncovering new genetic clues about the evolution of their long lifespan and large brains. Published in PNAS, the work was led by the University of Calgary in Canada and involved researchers at the University of Liverpool. (2021-02-15)

Study finds alligator hearts keep beating no matter what
A new study reported by Georgia Tech researchers finds that an alligator heart will not fibrillate when exposed to drastic temperature changes, unlike a rabbit (mammal) heart, which is critically vulnerable to heart trauma under those conditions. The research could help better understand how the heart works and what can cause a deadly arrhythmia - which fundamentally happens when the heart doesn't pump blood correctly any longer. (2021-02-15)

Lemurs show there's no single formula for lasting love
Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate -- some lemurs and other animals do, too. Duke researchers are mapping the hormone receptors that underlie these primates' ability to pair up for the long haul. Their findings suggest the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others. (2021-02-12)

Small mammals climb higher to flee warming temperatures in the Rockies
The golden-mantled ground squirrel is one of the most photographed animals in the Rocky Mountains. It's also joining many other species of rodents and shrews in Colorado that are making an ominous trek: They're climbing uphill to escape from climate change. (2021-02-11)

'Runway Roadkill' rapidly increasing at airports across the world, UCC study finds
The number of reported collisions (i.e. strikes) between aircraft and wildlife is increasing globally, with consequences for personnel and passenger safety as well as for industry economics. These are important considerations for airport operators that are obliged to mitigate wildlife hazards at airfields. Incidents involving mammals account for approximately 3-10% of all recorded strikes. However, relatively little research has been conducted on mammal strikes with aircraft outside of the USA. (2021-02-05)

Fossil pigments shed new light on vertebrate evolution
This new paper shows that melanin is more than just something that gives colour to the body. It played an important role in the evolution of warm-blooded animals and helped defined what birds and mammals look like today. By studying where melanin occurs in the body in fossils and modern animals researchers have produced the first model for how melanin has evolved over the last 500 million years. (2021-02-04)

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch. He adds, regarding the findings, 'Elephants have lots and lots and lots of extra copies of tumor suppressor genes, and they all contribute probably a little bit to cancer resistance.' (2021-02-04)

Even in same desert location, species experience differences in exposure to climate warming
Despite living in the same part of the Mojave Desert, and experiencing similar conditions, mammals and birds native to this region experienced fundamentally different exposures to climate warming over the last 100 years, a new study shows; small mammal communities there remained much more stable than birds, in the face of local climate change, it reports. (2021-02-04)

More mammals are being struck by aircraft each year
Investigators have published a global review of mammal strikes with aircraft, noting that events have been increasing by up to 68% annually. More mammals were struck during the landing phase of an aircraft's rotation than any other phase, according to the article published in Mammal Review. (2021-02-03)

Oncotarget: The goal of geroscience is life extension
Dr. Mikhail V. Blagosklonny from The Roswell Park Cancer Institute said, ''Although we do not know everything about aging, we now know enough to start its pharmacologic suppression using clinically approved drugs.'' (2021-02-02)

Squeeze it like toothpaste: The flexible brain of marsupial mammals
Being stretchy and squeezable may be the key to finding space for the brain in mammals, including humans. An international study, co-led by Flinders University's Vera Weisbecker, has revealed that marsupial mammals like possums, kangaroos, and wombats appear to have a lot of flexibility when it comes to accommodating their brains into their skulls. (2021-01-27)

Rediscovery of the 'extinct' Pinatubo volcano mouse
When Mount Pinatubo exploded in 1990, the surrounding Philippine ecosystem was devastated. Scientists thought that the Pinatubo volcano mouse that lived there went extinct. But researchers just discovered the volcano mouse alive and well. (2021-01-22)

California harbor porpoises rebound after coastal gillnetting stopped
Harbor porpoises have rebounded in a big way off California. Their populations have recovered dramatically since the end of state set-gillnet fisheries that years ago entangled and killed them in the nearshore waters they frequent. These coastal set-gillnet fisheries are distinct from federally-managed offshore drift-gillnet fisheries. They have been prohibited in inshore state waters for more than a decade. The new research indicates that the coastal set gillnets had taken a greater toll on harbor porpoise than previously realized. (2021-01-20)

Indigenous lands: A haven for wildlife
Indigenous peoples' lands may harbour a significant proportion of threatened and endangered species globally, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2021-01-20)

Behavioral traits converge for humans and animals sharing an environment
Humans, mammals and birds that live in a particular environment share a common set of behavioral traits, according to a new study, which identifies a local convergence of foraging, reproductive and social behaviors across species. (2021-01-14)

Sperm-specific gene expression in organisms including mice, macaques and men
A large class of mammalian genes is not completely shared throughout sperm development and differentiation, according to a new study of sperm in organisms including mice, macaques and men. (2021-01-14)

Genomes reveal insights into much-loved Aussie animals
Researchers have brought together expertise in bioinformatics, cytogenetics, developmental and molecular biology to produce and analyse the first ever echidna genome and a greatly improved, high quality platypus genome sequence. (2021-01-07)

Unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and duck
Three studies uncovered the unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and Peking duck. Platypus have five pairs of sex chromosomes forming an unusual chain shape, while the sex chromosomes of emu and duck are not as different between sexes as those of human. The studies were led or co-led by Qi Zhou's group at the University of Vienna and Zhejiang University of China and are published as research papers in the journals Nature, Genome Research and GigaScience. (2021-01-07)

How Earth's oddest mammal got to be so bizarre
Often considered the world's oddest mammal, Australia's beaver-like, duck-billed platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies, sweats milk, has venomous spurs and is even equipped with 10 sex chromosomes. Now, an international team of researchers led by University of Copenhagen has conducted a unique mapping of the platypus genome and found answers regarding the origins of a few of its stranger features. (2021-01-06)

New work provides insight into the relationship between complexity and diversity
Parts of the planet that are diverse biologically and culturally are even more diverse than you'd expect. A group of Santa Fe Institute collaborators developed a theory to show why richer environments are also more complex environments, where you tend to find more species and languages. (2021-01-05)

Early mammal with remarkably precise bite
Paleontologists have succeeded in reconstructing the chewing motion of an early mammal that lived almost 150 million years ago. This showed that its teeth worked extremely precisely and surprisingly efficiently. (2020-12-24)

Survival of the thickest: Big brains make mammal populations less dense
Body size and diet are known to influence mammal abundance in different areas, but brain size had not been considered previously. This new study shows that larger brains correlate with lower population densities, likely because of the additional resources they require. (2020-12-23)

Highest levels of microplastics found in molluscs, new study says
Mussels, oysters and scallops have the highest levels of microplastic contamination among seafood, a new study reveals. (2020-12-23)

Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Certain proteins call for unusual ways to get incorporated into membranes, because the signal sequence required for this process is located at their rear end instead of at the front. The relevant mechanism and its components are well-known and well-studied in yeast and mammals. Scientists have already hypothesised that it also occurs in plants, but there was no evidence of an indispensable receptor, until now. (2020-12-22)

A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science. (2020-12-22)

The 'crazy beast' that lived among the dinosaurs
New research published today in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology describes a bizarre 66 million-year-old mammal that provides profound new insights into the evolutionary history of mammals from the southern supercontinent Gondwana - recognized today as Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, the Indian subcontinent, and the Arabian Peninsula. (2020-12-18)

My what sharp teeth you have!
In the dinosaur world, theropods are well known for having blade-like teeth with serrated cutting edges used for biting and ripping their prey. And until recently, the complex arrangement of tissues that gave rise to these terrifying teeth was considered unique to these meat-eating dinosaurs. A new study in Biology Letters discovers this same complex arrangement in a group of mammalian predecessors that were also meat eaters. (2020-12-15)

The use of wild mammals in traditional medicine
In an analysis of published research, investigators identified 565 mammalian species that have been used to source products used in traditional medicine around the world, especially in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (2020-12-09)

Why do elephants and tigers still roam in India? Study offers clues
A study documenting four extinctions of large mammals on the Indian Subcontinent sheds light on why elephants, tigers, and rhinos still roam there. (2020-12-08)

Pilot whale study reveals copycat calls to outsmart predators
New Curtin University research has found southern Australian long-finned pilot whales are able to mimic the calls of its natural predator and food rival - the killer whale, as a possible ploy to outsmart it. (2020-12-03)

Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives. In a new review article, Williams explores how the diving physiology of marine mammals can help us understand the effects of COVID-19. (2020-12-03)

How dolphins avoid "the bends"
New evidence indicates that dolphins are able to consciously slow down their heart rates when preparing to dive, and can even adjust their heart rates according to the length of their intended dive. This allows them to conserve oxygen and adjust their body to the changing pressure as they dive, therefore avoiding issues such as ''the bends''. (2020-11-24)

Changes in fire activity are threatening more than 4,400 species globally
More than 4,400 species across the globe are at risk from extinction because of changes in fire activity says a new paper involving 27 international researchers. (2020-11-23)

Ancient interleukins 2, 15, and 15-like exhibited distinct functions but all bound IL-15Ra
Interleukin-15-like (IL-15L) is found in both fish and mammals and may be the last remaining cytokine shared between those species for which the function had not been determined yet. Scientists now report the first functional analysis of cytokine IL-15L which, similar to related IL-15 and primitive IL-2, forms a complex with receptor chain IL-15Ra, but in contrast to these cytokines selectively induces a type 2 immune response. (2020-11-20)

Truffle munching wallabies shed new light on forest conservation
A researcher from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia led an investigation into how swamp wallabies spread truffle spores around the environment. Results demonstrate the importance of these animals to the survival of the forest. (2020-11-19)

Review examines sexual aggression in mammals
A recent review of published studies in non-human mammals examines 'sexual disturbance,' or male behavior towards a female around mating that can be costly for the female -- for example, that might inflict physical harm or cause mother-offspring separation. The findings are published in Mammal Review. (2020-11-18)

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