Current Maple Syrup News and Events

Current Maple Syrup News and Events, Maple Syrup News Articles.
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Edible holograms could someday decorate foods
Holograms are everywhere, from driver's licenses to credit cards to product packaging. And now, edible holograms could someday enhance foods. Researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a laser-based method to print nanostructured holograms on dried corn syrup films. The edible holograms could also be used to ensure food safety, label a product or indicate sugar content, the researchers say. (2021-02-17)

Understanding origins of Arizona's Sunset Crater eruption of 1,000 years ago
ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration scientist Amanda Clarke and her team have been working to solve the mysterious root cause of the Sunset Crater eruption and any lessons learned to better understand the threats similar volcanoes may pose around the world today. But as to why it erupted, that has remained a mystery, until now. Clarke's group is among the first to show the importance of carbon dioxide in volcanic eruptions. (2021-01-11)

Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Leaf microbiomes of sugar maple trees vary across the species' range, changing in accordance with the types of trees in the surrounding ''neighborhood.'' (2020-12-03)

China's most important trees are hiding in plain sight
A research collaboration between Chinese and American scientists has synthesized long-term biodiversity data from 12 immense forest study plots spanning 1,500 miles, from China's far north to its southern tropics. Their results, published today in the journal Ecology, point to maple trees - long appreciated for their autumn foliage and the syrup that graces our tables - as potential foundation species in both China and North America. (2020-10-30)

High fructose intake may drive aggressive behaviors, ADHD, bipolar
New research suggests that conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome (ADHD), bipolar disorder, and even aggressive behaviors may be linked with sugar intake, and that it may have an evolutionary basis. (2020-10-16)

Trees prefer the big city life
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests in Newark, Del., and Philadelphia, Pa. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less urbanization in Newark. (2020-10-16)

Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study reports health risks related to the type of sugar consumed, but also reveals novel risks when sugars are combined, which has important implications for dietary guidelines. (2020-09-17)

Global warming is changing our plant communities
In a comprehensive study of nearly 20,000 species, University of Miami research shows that plant communities are shifting to include more heat-loving species as a result of climate change. (2020-08-17)

USU mathematicians unravel a thread of string theory
Thomas Hill and Andreas Malmendier of Utah State University, and Adrian Clingher of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, explore a string duality between F-theory and heterotic string theory in eight dimensions in paper published in 'Letters in Mathematical Physics.' (2020-08-17)

Sweet coolers a gateway to increased alcohol consumption
Sweetened alcoholic beverages can promote harmful alcohol consumption among teens, new University of Guelph research finds. (2020-07-22)

Examining association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars with metabolic syndrome
This study combined the results of 13 studies with nearly 50,000 participants to look at the association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars, such as sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup, with the risk of metabolic syndrome. (2020-07-09)

Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research. (2020-07-07)

Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides. (2020-06-16)

An artificial 'tongue' of gold to taste maple syrup
A chemistry professor at Université de Montréal has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavour profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality. (2020-05-05)

Breeding a hardier, more nutritious wheat
High-fructan wheat provides benefits for growers and consumers. (2020-04-15)

30-year study identifies need of disease-modifying therapies for maple syrup urine disease
A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), which is among the most volatile and dangerous inherited metabolic disorders. (2020-01-24)

Climate change unlikely to drive sugar maples north
Sugar maples won't be heading north anytime soon, despite climate change, according to a new study published in the Journal of Ecology. (2020-01-12)

Scientists discover how proteins form crystals that tile a microbe's shell
Many microbes wear beautifully patterned crystalline shells, which protect them from a harsh world and can even help them reel in food. Now scientists have zoomed in on the very first step in microbial shell-building: nucleation, where squiggly proteins crystallize into sturdy building blocks. What they found helps explain how the shells assemble themselves so quickly. (2019-12-17)

St. Michael's Hospital study examines the relationship between sugars and heart health
There's an assumption that sugars are all bad, but a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital suggests that the impact of sugars on heart health depends on the dose and type of sugar consumed. Led by Dr. John Sievenpiper, the team conducted a review of previous studies investigating the association between reported intakes of sugars and heart disease. The team found that that sugars behave differently depending on the type, dose and food. (2019-12-05)

Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions
Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study shows. (2019-12-04)

Boosting host immune defenses to treat tuberculosis
A study in iScience suggests a new approach that might help treat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis: making people's cells better at killing Mtb by harnessing RNA sensors in our cells, which detect the RNA of invading pathogens. For the first time, researchers led by Anne Goldfeld, MD, of Boston Children's Hospital's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, showed that RNA sensing is important in inhibiting Mtb's growth once it gets inside cells. (2019-11-12)

UNH researchers find northern forests have lost crucial cold, snowy conditions
Winter conditions are changing more rapidly than any other season and researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found clear signs of a decline in frost days, snow covered days and other indicators of winter that could have lasting impacts on ecosystems, water supplies, the economy, tourism and human health. (2019-10-03)

Today's obesity epidemic may have been caused by childhood sugar intake decades ago
Current obesity rates in adults in the United States could be the result of dietary changes that took place decades ago, according to a new study published by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-09-23)

Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier
Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season. With climate change, daily temperatures are on the rise, which affects sap flow and sugar content. By 2100, the maple syrup season in eastern North America may be one month earlier than it was during 1950 and 2017, according to a study published in Forest Ecology and Management (2019-09-20)

Deer browsing is not stopping the densification of Eastern forests
Selective browsing by white-tailed deer has been blamed by many for changing the character and composition of forest understories in the eastern US; however, its impact on the forest canopy was previously unknown. (2019-09-03)

Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot
Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees -- such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer -- Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle. (2019-08-12)

U-M researchers testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change
In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, University of Michigan scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change. (2019-06-17)

Striped maple trees often change sexes, with females more likely to die
Although pollen has covered cars for weeks and allergy sufferers have been sneezing, we think of sex as being the realm of animals. But plant sex can be quite interesting, especially in species that can have male or female flowers. In a study in the journal Annals of Botany, Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers found that striped maple trees can change sex from year to year. (2019-05-29)

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18
A swarm of more than 3,000 small earthquakes in the Maple Creek area (in Yellowstone National Park but outside of the Yellowstone volcano caldera) between June 2017 and March 2018 are, at least in part, aftershocks of the 1959 quake. (2019-05-23)

Eastern forests shaped more by Native Americans' burning than climate change
Native Americans' use of fire to manage vegetation in what is now the Eastern United States was more profound than previously believed, according to a Penn State researcher who determined that forest composition change in the region was caused more by land use than climate change. (2019-05-21)

Native forest plants rebound when invasive shrubs are removed
Removing invasive shrubs to restore native forest habitat brings a surprising result, according to Penn State researchers, who say desired native understory plants display an unexpected ability and vigor to recolonize open spots. (2019-05-14)

Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (2019-05-07)

When a tree falls in St. Louis, will the power go out?
Saint Louis University researchers paired satellite imaging data with machine learning techniques to map local tree species and health. (2019-05-06)

Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars
A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy. (2019-05-03)

Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances
Princeton University researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. These symbioses could help scientists understand how ecosystems may shift as climate change alters the interplay between plants, microbes and soil. (2019-04-17)

Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast
The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar. (2019-04-15)

Understanding what makes Tennessee whiskey unique
Freshly distilled, un-aged whiskey is filtered over charcoal made from the sugar maple tree in a mysterious, but necessary step known as the Lincoln County Process. By law, a product cannot be called Tennessee whiskey without it. Researchers now say they have some clues as to what the process imparts to the final product. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-03-31)

Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes
Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University. (2019-03-28)

Adhesive formed from bee spit and flower oil could form basis of new glues
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology are looking to a bee 'glue' as a model for a bioinspired adhesive because of its unique properties and ability to remain sticky through a range of conditions. (2019-03-27)

Land conservation helps local economies grow
Land conservation modestly increases employment rates, a traditional indicator of economic growth, according to an analysis of New England cities and towns, led by scientists at Amherst College, Harvard Forest, the Highstead Foundation, and Boston University. (2019-03-26)

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