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Current Maple Syrup News and Events, Maple Syrup News Articles.
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High-fructose corn syrup enhances tumor growth in a mouse model of intestinal cancer
In a new study, researchers have found that consumption of high-fructose corn syrup can enhance tumor growth in mice that are genetically predisposed to develop intestinal cancer. (2019-03-21)

High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice
Consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup -- the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily -- accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity. (2019-03-21)

High-fructose corn syrup promotes colon tumor growth in mice
Consuming the equivalent of one can of soda per day caused mice predisposed to colon cancer to develop larger tumors, according to a study by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. (2019-03-21)

Seeing through food and drug fakes and frauds
A simple new technique developed by engineers from the University of California, Riverside that can detect fake drugs from a video taken as the sample undergoes a disturbance. Called 'chronoprinting,' the technology requires only a few relatively inexpensive pieces of equipment and free software to accurately distinguish pure from inferior food and medicines. (2019-03-20)

Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the pavement
A new NC State University study of urban tree life in the Southeast shows pavement and concrete may have a bigger effect than longitudinal warming. (2019-03-04)

Do endangered woods make better guitars?
Researchers have tested the sounds made by six different acoustic guitars in a study addressing the effects of the type of wood used in their construction. Some of the woods used for guitar backs are revered by guitar players for their acoustic qualities, and are claimed to be tonally superior to other woods. Unfortunately many of these woods are expensive, rare, and from unsustainable sources. (2019-01-21)

New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies
A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the role of yeast, the world's most basic eukaryotic unicellular organism, may pave the way for the development of novel, more effective therapies for congenital diseases. (2019-01-16)

A correlation between obesity and income has only developed in the past 30 years
It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the past 30 years, according to researchers in Tennessee and London. Since 1990, the rise of obesity and diabetes was fastest among the poorest US regions, says Alexander Bentley of the University of Tennessee. (2018-12-11)

Relationship between low income and obesity is relatively new, says study
It's a fact: poverty and obesity are intimately connected. But this relationship is only about 30 years old, according to a new study coauthored by UT researchers and published in Palgrave Communications, an open-access, online journal. (2018-12-11)

Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions
Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing carbon dioxide and filter pollutants from the air and water. (2018-12-01)

'True polar wander' may have caused ice age
Earth's latest ice age may have been caused by changes deep inside the planet. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands. (2018-11-19)

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar
Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2018-10-31)

Parent educational tools on pain relief help reduce babies' vaccination distress
Information provided to new parents in hospital about how to alleviate pain for their babies during vaccination resulted in more frequent use of pain interventions at future infant vaccinations, reports a study published in CMAJ. (2018-10-22)

A crucial gene controls stem juiciness in sorghum and beyond
Sorghum, the fifth most popular crop worldwide, is used to create many products in the United States and is widely consumed by people in developing countries. The discovery of a crucial gene controlling stem juiciness in sorghum has important implications for the genetic improvement of this ancient grain and likely other crops as well. (2018-10-02)

The sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason?
Over the past 50 years researchers, clinicians, professional organizations, and health charities have waged war on sugar, calling for dietary recommendations to be changed and for a sugar tax on soft drinks and sweet treats in an effort to reduce obesity and cardiovascular diseases. (2018-08-27)

Stabilizing dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane improves muscle function
In a head-to-head trial between the conventional glucocorticoid, prednisolone, and a modified glucocorticoid, vamorolone, in experimental models of LGMD2B, vamorolone improved dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane stability and repair. This correlated with increased muscle strength and decreased muscle degeneration, according to a Children's-led study published online Aug. 27, 2018, in Molecular Therapy. (2018-08-27)

In the eastern US, adult trees adapt and acclimate to local climate
Trees growing in temperate forests in the eastern US show strong adaptation or acclimation to local climate. So reports a new study that analyzed more than 23,000 tree cores to investigate how adult trees respond to changes in climatic conditions. Results were published this week in the journal Ecosphere. (2018-08-21)

Maple leaf extract could nip skin wrinkles in the bud
Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep -- and that's a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

Mathematical analysis explains transpiration-driven sap flow in coniferous trees
The exact science of tree sap transport has puzzled plant physiologists for many years. Sap's migration throughout tree trunks and branches is linked heavily to transpiration, the movement and subsequent evaporation of moisture from plants. In an article publishing this week in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics, Bebart M. Janbek and John M. Stockie present a multidimensional porous medium model that measures sap flow within a tree stem. (2018-07-26)

Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created. (2018-07-23)

Isoglucose and sucrose
Isoglucose, also known as high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), is used in the food industry as a substance to sweeten processed foods such as soft drinks, creams, cakes, confectionery, yogurts etc. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has been asked by various parties whether these sweeteners, which contain a high proportion of the free monosaccharide (simple sugar) fructose, pose a particular risk to health as compared to other sweeteners such as sucrose (household sugar, beet sugar, cane sugar). (2018-07-05)

Twisted meta-molecules as they really are
Physicists at the University of Bath have devised a new and highly sensitive method to truly test the chirality of a material, eliminating the risk of false positives from competing effects. (2018-06-26)

Carbohydrates shape the profile of gut metabolites in piglet model of NEC
Study shows an association between the type of carbohydrates in formula; the products of metabolism or metabolites; and the risk of NEC in a preterm piglet model of the human condition. (2018-06-26)

Honey may reduce injury in children who have swallowed button batteries
Ingestion of button batteries, which are frequently found in the household setting, can rapidly lead to caustic esophageal injury in infants and children. A new study published in The Laryngoscope found that drinking honey or Carafate® (a cherry- flavored duodenal ulcer prescription) may help reduce esophageal damage. (2018-06-12)

Sugars in infant formulas pose risk to babies with inherited metabolic disorder
Babies with inherited intolerance of fructose face a risk of acute liver failure if they are fed certain widely available formulas containing fructose, pediatricians and geneticists are warning. Baby formula manufacturers should remove fructose or sucrose, or explicitly label their products to allow parents to avoid those sweeteners if necessary, the doctors say. (2018-05-17)

Metastatic cancer gorges on fructose in the liver
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that metastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs. Cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The finding offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting metastatic cancer. (2018-04-26)

Mediterranean diet boosts beneficial bacteria
Here's another reason to eat a Mediterranean-type diet: it's good for your gut. Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center found that eating a plant-based diet enhanced the good bacteria living in the gut by up to 7 percent as compared to only 0.5 percent from eating a more meat-centric, Western diet. (2018-04-25)

Pregnant moms and their offspring should limit added sugars in their diets to protect childhood cognition
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has determined that poorer childhood cognition occurred, particularly in memory and learning, when pregnant women or their offspring consumed greater quantities of sugar. Substituting diet soda for sugar-sweetened versions during pregnancy also appeared to have negative effects. However, children's fruit consumption had beneficial effects and was associated with higher cognitive scores. (2018-04-19)

Opioid use prevalent among electronic dance music partygoers
One in 10 electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees have misused opioids in the past year, exceeding the national average, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (2018-03-29)

Landscape genetics branches out to help conserve riverside forests
A team of scientists lead by Dr Ikuyo Saeki of the University of Tsukuba, Japan, examined gene flow in the endangered maple, Acer miyabei, using landscape genetics, a powerful and increasingly popular tool in conservation projects. It involves the integration of population genetics and landscape ecology, in order to examine how recent landscape changes, for example, habitat fragmentation, have affected the genetic diversity of species. (2018-02-27)

Damage encourages maple species to become female, Rutgers study finds
Jennifer Blake-Mahmud reports that striped maples not only change their sex periodically, but that they can wait until the last minute - three weeks before flowering - to do it. The switch appears to be triggered by physical damage, which can prompt a branch to flower female if it's cut off a male tree. (2018-02-22)

Michigan's sugar maples will struggle in a warmer, drier future despite help from nitrogen pollution
Though Michigan's sugar maples benefit from the growth-promoting effects of nitrogen compounds in the environment, those gains will not fully offset the added stresses of growing under a drier climate in the future, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. (2018-01-17)

Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees, study finds
When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-01-08)

Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials
Researchers use lasers to blast solutions containing delicate organic compounds to grow new types of crystals for solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. (2018-01-03)

Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity liquids. Kobayashi and Kurita found that concentration fluctuations are enhanced by thermal convection when the two liquids have a large viscosity difference. Such mixtures are ubiquitously observed in nature, daily life, and manufacturing processes, e.g. mantle convection, syrup, polymer products. These results promise further insight into non-equilibrium phenomena in fluid mixtures with contrasting 'thickness.' (2017-12-15)

Poison-ivy an unlikely hero in warding off exotic invaders?
The invasive Japanese knotweed causes much more severe damage to floodplain forests along the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA, than previously thought, report Bucknell University biology professor Chris Martine and his two student co-authors. Furthermore, in their paper in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, the researchers point to a key role for the often-maligned poison-ivy as a native species that can not only compete with knotweed but also help sustain the growth of new trees. (2017-11-13)

Research advances understanding of opioid addiction in face of public health crisis
As the United States grapples with the devastating effects of an opioid epidemic, researchers are making progress in advancing our understanding of opioid addiction-related health issues, according to studies presented today at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2017-11-13)

Native trees, shrubs provide more food for birds
Plant native trees and shrubs in your yard, and you can really help songbirds. In a study of the Carolina chickadee in the metropolitan DC area, researchers from the University of Delaware and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center found that native trees and shrubs support much more 'bird food' -- caterpillars -- than non-natives do. (2017-10-30)

Neonics put bumblebees at risk of extinction by hindering colony formation, study reveals
Bumblebees are less able to start colonies when exposed to a common neonicotinoid pesticide, according to a new University of Guelph study. Professor Nigel Raine has discovered that exposure to thiamethoxam reduces the chances of a bumblebee queen starting a new colony by more than a quarter. Using a mathematical model, the researchers found that this rate of decline could threaten extinction of wild bumblebee populations. (2017-08-14)

Overweight children and adults get significantly healthier and quickly with less sugar
Reducing fructose, particularly high-fructose corn syrup, in our diet for just nine days can show significantly improved measures of health. (2017-08-07)

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