Current Marathon Runners News and Events

Current Marathon Runners News and Events, Marathon Runners News Articles.
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Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Age shall not weary them when it comes to discus and javelin
Discus and javelin throwers as well as marathon runners and race walkers are likely to achieve their best performances at a later age than sprinters, hurdlers and middle-distance runners. Why? It comes down to muscle fibres and technique. (2021-02-10)

Some sperms poison their competitors
A genetic factor helps sperm cells outcompete their peers (2021-02-04)

Soldiers, snakes and marathon runners in the hidden world of fungi
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered the individual traits of fungi, and how their hyphae - that is, the fungal threads that grow in soil - behave very differently as they navigate through the earth's microscopic labyrinths. (2021-02-02)

Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs. (2021-01-07)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
Watch a video about Evie's treatment with an experimental gene therapy for sickle cell disease here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmQJpuLx07Y (2020-11-30)

Sniffing your way to the gym
On a near daily basis, the internet spews out numerous tips and tricks for exercise motivation. Now we can add smell to the long and growing list. A research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has found olfaction--or smell--may play an important role in motivating mammals to engage in voluntary exercise. Performed in lab mice, the study may open up new areas of research and have relevance for humans. (2020-11-25)

Study reveals physical demands of two-hour marathon
Elite runners need a specific combination of physiological abilities to have any chance of running a sub-two-hour marathon, new research shows. (2020-11-13)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

Predicting sports performance with "big data"
Smartphones and wearable devices are not simple accessories for athletes. A CNRS researcher has developed a simple mathematical model for studying the performance of endurance athletes. A recent collaboration with a scientist from the Polar Electro Oy company (Finland) made it possible to apply the model to data gathered from approximately 14,000 runners training in real conditions. (2020-10-06)

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)

The return of the spin echo
The spin of particles can be manipulated by a magnetic field. This principle is the basic idea behind magnetic resonance imaging as used in hospitals. A surprising effect has now been discovered in the spins of phosphorus atoms coupled to microwaves: If the atoms are excited, they can emit a series of echoes. This opens up new ways of information processing in quantum systems. (2020-09-24)

On the road to conductors of the future
Superconducting wires can transport electricity without loss. This would allow for less power production, reducing both costs and greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, extensive cooling stands in the way, because existing superconductors only lose their resistance at extremely low temperatures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientist have now introduced new findings about hydrogen sulfide in the H(3)S form, and its deuterium analogue D(3)S, which become superconducting at the relatively high temperatures of -77 and -107 °C, respectively. (2020-09-14)

Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke. (2020-09-06)

Why we distort probability
A team of scientists has concluded that our cognitive limitations lead to probability distortions and to subsequent errors in decision-making. (2020-08-25)

Lack of continuous infectious disease pandemic research endangers responses
The coronavirus was also studied considerably less than blood borne viruses like Hepatitis B or C and H.I.V. and its research community has less prolific researchers than the other investigated diseases. This translates into limited collaborations and a non-sustained investment in research on coronaviruses. Such a short-lived investment also reduces funding and may slow down important developments such as new drugs, vaccines or preventive strategies. (2020-08-17)

Causes of higher risk of stress fractures in female runners
A pair of new studies identify overlooked physiological factors and lack of knowledge around wellness as contributors to risk of stress fracture in women who run. (2020-08-11)

35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
How hard is it to pick the next Usain Bolt, Ian Thorpe or Anna Meares? Finding a world champion often falls to talent scouts and involves years of hard work, but could it be as simple as a 35-second body scan? (2020-08-03)

Running in Tarahumara culture
Running in Tarahumara (Rarámuri) Culture. The Tarahumara (Rarámuri) are a Native American people from Chihuahua, Mexico, who have long been famous for running, but there is widespread incredulity about how and why they run such long distances. Tarahumara, like many Native American peoples, consider running, along with other endurance-based activities, to have important social dimensions, such as a spiritually vital form of prayer. (Current Anthropology) (2020-07-06)

A new view of microscopic interactions
When two cars collide at an intersection -- from opposite directions -- the impact is much different than when two cars -- traveling in the same direction -- 'bump' into each other. In the laboratory, similar types of collisions can be made to occur between molecules to study chemistry at very low temperatures, or 'cold collisions.' A team of scientists led by Arthur Suits at the University of Missouri has developed a new experimental approach to study chemistry using these cold 'same direction' molecular collisions. (2020-06-30)

T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues. (2020-05-13)

T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed. (2020-05-13)

How to break new records in the 200 metres?
Usain Bolt's 200m record has not been beaten for ten years and Florence Griffith Joyner's for more than thirty years. And what about if the secret behind beating records was to use mathematics? Thanks to a mathematical model, french researchers have proved that the geometry of athletic tracks could be optimised to improve records. They recommend to build shorter straights and larger radii in the future. (2020-03-25)

Stanford engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running
Researchers find that a motorized device that attaches around the ankle and foot can drastically reduce the energy cost of running. (2020-03-25)

Honeybee dance dialects
Honeybees use their waggle dance to tell their conspecifics where to find food. Depending on the honeybee species, there are different dance dialects, as a German-Indian research team has shown. (2020-03-04)

Why runner's addiction is adding to your injury woes
Each week, millions of runners around the world lace up their running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers. But new research from the University of South Australia reveals a downside. (2020-03-04)

Slow, steady increase in exercise intensity is best for heart health
For the vast majority of people, the benefits of physical exercise outweigh the risks. However, for those who have inadequate training or who have underlying heart problems that may not have been detected, the risks of heart issues from extreme exercise, such as participation in marathons and triathlons, are increased. (2020-02-26)

Examining enlargement of the aorta among older endurance athletes
Researchers in this observational study evaluated dimensions of the aorta in 442 older competitive runners and rowers (ages 50 to 75) to examine the association between long-term endurance exercise and enlargement of the artery. (2020-02-26)

Electrolyte supplements don't prevent illness in athletes, study finds
Electrolyte supplements popular with endurance runners can't be relied on to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators. (2020-02-25)

For 'blade runners' taller doesn't necessarily mean faster
The governing body for the Paralympics recently lowered the allowable height for sprinters who use prosthetic legs, or blades, during competition. The rules are based on the assumption that the taller you are the faster you run. But a new study has found otherwise. (2020-02-20)

Tart cherry juice concentrate found to help improve endurance exercise performance
Montmorency tart cherry juice has gained a reputation as a recovery drink among elite and recreational exercisers, with research suggesting benefits for reducing strength loss and improving muscle recovery after intensive exercise. Now, a new first-of-its-kind analysis published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that tart cherries improved endurance exercise performance among study participants. (2020-02-19)

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells
Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell. 'The cell looks like it has just run a marathon, apparently, the cell requires energy to absorb such nanoparticles' says lead author James McNally. (2020-02-12)

Food packaging that's good enough to eat
These days, many people are concerned about plastic waste; however, the convenience, mechanical properties and cost of plastic food packaging are hard to beat. But now, a growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are trying to make edible packaging and tableware from foods like seaweed, milk proteins and potato starch, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, produced in collaboration with ACS Central Science.  (2020-01-29)

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon
The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age. (2020-01-06)

Running research: Heel-toe or toe-heel?
New research from La Trobe University suggests there is no evidence that changing a runner's strike pattern will help prevent injuries or give them a speed boost. (2019-12-11)

New antitumoral drug release strategy created for breast cancer treatment
Researchers from the CIBER-BBN and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona use bioengineering to design non-toxic drug-release granules to be administered locally and with prolonged therapeutic effects. (2019-11-21)

Fun run
Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%. (2019-10-08)

Spying on topology
Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular -- trivial -- counterparts within a millionth of a billionth of a second by probing it with ultra-fast laser light. (2019-10-02)

Taking evolution to heart
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease--one of the most common causes of illness and death in the developed world. (2019-09-16)

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