Current Marathon Runners News and Events | Page 2

Current Marathon Runners News and Events, Marathon Runners News Articles.
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Study finds human hearts evolved for endurance
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life. As a result, human hearts are now less 'ape-like' and better suited to endurance types of activity. (2019-09-16)

Skin cancer risk in athletes: The dangers of ultraviolet radiation
The dangers of ultraviolet radiation exposure, which most often comes from the sun, are well-known. Speaking at The Physiological Society's Extreme Environmental Physiology conference next week, W. Larry Kenney, Penn State University, will discuss how broad its effects can be, from premature aging to cancer, and how this can be influenced by different skin tones and the use of sunscreen. (2019-08-30)

Marathoners, take your marks...and fluid and salt!
Legend states that after the Greek army defeated the invading Persian forces near the city of Marathon in 490 B.C.E., the courier Pheidippides ran to Athens to report the victory and then immediately dropped dead. The story -- and the distance Pheidippides covered -- inspired the modern marathon, a grueling 26.2-mile contest that attracts some 1.3 million runners annually to compete in the more than 800 races held worldwide. (2019-08-29)

One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses. The results published in PNAS also provide new insights into age-related muscle atrophy. (2019-07-25)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong
A new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus. (2019-07-15)

Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)

Elbows key for walkers' efficiency
Why do walkers hold their arms straight and runners bend the arm at the elbow? A team of scientists at Harvard University campus have discovered that walking with a straight arm is much more efficient than holding it bent, but the jury is still out why runners bend their arms. (2019-07-09)

Extreme exercise can strain the heart without causing permanent damage
Researchers have found no evidence of elevated cardiac risk in runners who completed a 24-hour ultramarathon (24UM), despite the transient elevation of blood biomarkers that measure cardiac health. According to the study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, trained runners were more likely than their novice counterparts to experience raised levels, reflecting the greater cardiac load and pituitary-adrenocortical response to extremely strenuous exercise. (2019-06-27)

Study shows visual framing by media in debates affects public perception
New research shows that in the 2016 primary debates the front runners from both parties benefitted from preferential visual treatment by the media, but Donald Trump won in terms of camera time and angle. (2019-06-24)

Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes
New research has identified a type of bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes that contributes to improved capacity for exercise. These bacteria, members of the genus Veillonella, are not found in the guts of sedentary people. (2019-06-24)

Discovery of performance-enhancing bacteria in the human microbiome
A collaborative team of Harvard researchers pinpointed one specific group of bacteria, called Veillonella, that they found was enriched in the gut microbiome of Boston Marathon runners after after completing the 26.2 race and in an independent group of 87 elite and Olympic athletes after competitions. Veillonella bacteria isolated from marathon athletes and given to mice increased the animals' performances in laboratory treadmill tests by 13% compared to control bacteria. (2019-06-24)

All human endurance activities share a common metabolic ceiling
In one of the first attempts to quantify the limits of human energy expenditure over time, researchers using data on athletes who competed in global endurance events report that human energy expenditure could not be sustained above 2.5 times the rate of metabolism at rest. The findings from Caitlin Thurber and colleagues suggest that all human activities share the same. (2019-06-05)

New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs
Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from. (2019-05-09)

Training for first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of blood vessels
Training for and completing a first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of major blood vessels, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The study found that older and slower runners benefit the most. (2019-05-03)

Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism. (2019-04-30)

Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket
Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications. (2019-04-29)

A deep learning tool for personalized workout recommendations from fitness tracking data
Computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed FitRec, a recommendation tool powered by deep learning, that is able to better estimate runners' heart rates during a workout and predict and recommend routes. The team will present their work at the WWW 19 conference May 13-17 in San Francisco. (2019-04-22)

Despite transition period, maximal running shoes may still increase risk of injury
A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to ''maximal'' running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time. (2019-04-16)

Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly
Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature? (2019-04-09)

Predicting the uphill battle
For wildland firefighters retreating from the fire to a safety zone, predicting how long it takes to move across terrain can be a matter of life and death. Geographers developed a series of models that strongly predict how terrain slope impacts travel rates. Using a crowdsourced fitness-tracking database, they analyzed GPS data from nearly 30,000 people. The resulting models are the first to account for variability in travel rates between slow, medium and fast movers. (2019-04-03)

Running upright: The minuscule movements that keep us from falling
Maybe running comes easy, each stride pleasant and light. Maybe it comes hard, each step a slog to the finish. Either way, the human body is constantly calibrating, making microscopic adjustments to keep us from falling as we weekend-warrior our way to greatness. (2019-03-28)

Step it up: Does running cadence matter? Not as much as previously thought
Contrary to long-standing popular belief, running at a prescribed, one-size-fits-all ''optimal'' cadence doesn't play as big a role in speed and efficiency as once thought. (2019-03-27)

Ankle exoskeleton fits under clothes for potential broad adoption
The device does not require additional components such as batteries or actuators carried on the back or waist. (2019-03-22)

Stopwatch set for milestone marathon in 2032
The elusive sub-two hour marathon running mark will likely be first shattered by a male athlete in May 2032, according to a ground-breaking statistical study by Dr. Simon Angus from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. (2019-02-26)

Diet could help runners beat stomach issues
Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement. (2019-02-14)

Slower runners benefit most from elite methods
How much do high-tech shoes, special diets and exercises, drafting behind other runners and other strategies to improve your 'running economy' actually improve your finish time? A new study spells it out. The takeaway: The faster you are, the harder it is to get faster. (2019-02-12)

Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions
Researchers at the University of Maryland have engineered a new fabric from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating that is activated by temperature and humidity, releasing heat in warm humid conditions and trapping heat when conditions are cool and dry. (2019-02-07)

Is coronary artery calcification in highly active people like marathon runners associated with increased risk of death?
Some studies have suggested that people with high levels of physical activity way beyond current physical activity guidelines, such as marathon runners, can have significant build-up of calcium in the arteries of their heart called coronary artery calcification (CAC). But data are limited about the risk of death in these highly active people with CAC. This study included nearly 22,000 men (average age almost 52) with varying levels of self-reported physical activity and who underwent CAC scanning. (2019-01-30)

Human milk is a 'life-saving intervention' for infants with congenital heart disease
With a lower risk of serious complications and improved feeding and growth outcomes, human milk is strongly preferred as the best diet for infants with congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a research review in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2019-01-30)

Athletes can rest easy: Extreme exercise does not raise heart disease risk or mortality
High volumes of exercise are safe, even when coronary calcium levels are high. (2019-01-30)

Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but a Vanderbilt University engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing. (2019-01-17)

New review shows plant-based diets benefit athletes' heart health, endurance, recovery
A new scientific review published in the journal Nutrients provides evidence that plant-based athletes benefit from improvements in heart health, performance, and recovery. (2019-01-10)

Researchers uncover new mechanism of gene regulation involved in tumor progression
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, have discovered a new mechanism controlling the expression of a set of genes important for cell proliferation and tumor progression. Their research, which has been published in Molecular Cell, responds to a very fundamental question about how key genes lead to tumors growth by maintaining their active expression. This finding opens the possibility to better target and develop new therapies for certain types of cancer. (2019-01-08)

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral of the 2017 Paris marathon. (2019-01-03)

How is big data impacting sports analytics?
Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics. (2018-12-20)

GVSU researcher compares running economy in Nike shoe, track spikes
Kyle Barnes, assistant professor of movement science at Grand Valley State University, has researched strategies to improve running economy and performance for years. He incorporated the Nike Vaporfly 4 percent shoes in his studies and in October published results in the journal Sports Medicine that validated Nike's original study results giving the shoe the 4 percent name, while at the same time, comparing the NVF to traditional track spikes worn during track racing. It's the first study to compare NVF with a spike shoe. (2018-12-12)

Using drones to simplify film animation
Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. ETH researchers have now shown how drones can be used to greatly reduce the effort required in the process. (2018-12-05)

Running a marathon can increase cardiac strain in amateur runners
Amateurs running full-length marathons could be significantly raising levels of several key biomarkers of cardiac strain. Levels of two proteins -- troponin I and troponin T -- were highest after runners completed a full marathon compared to a half marathon, and a 10K race, as were other biomarkers of cardiac stress. (2018-12-03)

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