Current Marathon News and Events

Current Marathon News and Events, Marathon News Articles.
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Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Soldiers, snakes and marathon runners in the hidden world of fungi
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered the individual traits of fungi, and how their hyphae - that is, the fungal threads that grow in soil - behave very differently as they navigate through the earth's microscopic labyrinths. (2021-02-02)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
Watch a video about Evie's treatment with an experimental gene therapy for sickle cell disease here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmQJpuLx07Y (2020-11-30)

Study reveals physical demands of two-hour marathon
Elite runners need a specific combination of physiological abilities to have any chance of running a sub-two-hour marathon, new research shows. (2020-11-13)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

Predicting sports performance with "big data"
Smartphones and wearable devices are not simple accessories for athletes. A CNRS researcher has developed a simple mathematical model for studying the performance of endurance athletes. A recent collaboration with a scientist from the Polar Electro Oy company (Finland) made it possible to apply the model to data gathered from approximately 14,000 runners training in real conditions. (2020-10-06)

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)

Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke. (2020-09-06)

Why we distort probability
A team of scientists has concluded that our cognitive limitations lead to probability distortions and to subsequent errors in decision-making. (2020-08-25)

Lack of continuous infectious disease pandemic research endangers responses
The coronavirus was also studied considerably less than blood borne viruses like Hepatitis B or C and H.I.V. and its research community has less prolific researchers than the other investigated diseases. This translates into limited collaborations and a non-sustained investment in research on coronaviruses. Such a short-lived investment also reduces funding and may slow down important developments such as new drugs, vaccines or preventive strategies. (2020-08-17)

35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
How hard is it to pick the next Usain Bolt, Ian Thorpe or Anna Meares? Finding a world champion often falls to talent scouts and involves years of hard work, but could it be as simple as a 35-second body scan? (2020-08-03)

A new view of microscopic interactions
When two cars collide at an intersection -- from opposite directions -- the impact is much different than when two cars -- traveling in the same direction -- 'bump' into each other. In the laboratory, similar types of collisions can be made to occur between molecules to study chemistry at very low temperatures, or 'cold collisions.' A team of scientists led by Arthur Suits at the University of Missouri has developed a new experimental approach to study chemistry using these cold 'same direction' molecular collisions. (2020-06-30)

T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues. (2020-05-13)

Honeybee dance dialects
Honeybees use their waggle dance to tell their conspecifics where to find food. Depending on the honeybee species, there are different dance dialects, as a German-Indian research team has shown. (2020-03-04)

Slow, steady increase in exercise intensity is best for heart health
For the vast majority of people, the benefits of physical exercise outweigh the risks. However, for those who have inadequate training or who have underlying heart problems that may not have been detected, the risks of heart issues from extreme exercise, such as participation in marathons and triathlons, are increased. (2020-02-26)

X-ray microscopy at BESSY II: Nanoparticles can change cells
Nanoparticles easily enter into cells. New insights about how they are distributed and what they do there are shown for the first time by high-resolution 3D microscopy images from BESSY II. For example, certain nanoparticles accumulate preferentially in certain organelles of the cell. This can increase the energy costs in the cell. 'The cell looks like it has just run a marathon, apparently, the cell requires energy to absorb such nanoparticles' says lead author James McNally. (2020-02-12)

Food packaging that's good enough to eat
These days, many people are concerned about plastic waste; however, the convenience, mechanical properties and cost of plastic food packaging are hard to beat. But now, a growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are trying to make edible packaging and tableware from foods like seaweed, milk proteins and potato starch, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, produced in collaboration with ACS Central Science.  (2020-01-29)

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon
The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age. (2020-01-06)

New antitumoral drug release strategy created for breast cancer treatment
Researchers from the CIBER-BBN and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona use bioengineering to design non-toxic drug-release granules to be administered locally and with prolonged therapeutic effects. (2019-11-21)

Marathoners, take your marks...and fluid and salt!
Legend states that after the Greek army defeated the invading Persian forces near the city of Marathon in 490 B.C.E., the courier Pheidippides ran to Athens to report the victory and then immediately dropped dead. The story -- and the distance Pheidippides covered -- inspired the modern marathon, a grueling 26.2-mile contest that attracts some 1.3 million runners annually to compete in the more than 800 races held worldwide. (2019-08-29)

One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses. The results published in PNAS also provide new insights into age-related muscle atrophy. (2019-07-25)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

Investigation into fungal infection reveals genetic vulnerability in Hmong
A new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers Caitlin Pepperell and Bruce Klein has identified a specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people that renders them more susceptible to the disease-causing fungus. (2019-07-15)

Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)

Elbows key for walkers' efficiency
Why do walkers hold their arms straight and runners bend the arm at the elbow? A team of scientists at Harvard University campus have discovered that walking with a straight arm is much more efficient than holding it bent, but the jury is still out why runners bend their arms. (2019-07-09)

Extreme exercise can strain the heart without causing permanent damage
Researchers have found no evidence of elevated cardiac risk in runners who completed a 24-hour ultramarathon (24UM), despite the transient elevation of blood biomarkers that measure cardiac health. According to the study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, trained runners were more likely than their novice counterparts to experience raised levels, reflecting the greater cardiac load and pituitary-adrenocortical response to extremely strenuous exercise. (2019-06-27)

Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes
New research has identified a type of bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes that contributes to improved capacity for exercise. These bacteria, members of the genus Veillonella, are not found in the guts of sedentary people. (2019-06-24)

Discovery of performance-enhancing bacteria in the human microbiome
A collaborative team of Harvard researchers pinpointed one specific group of bacteria, called Veillonella, that they found was enriched in the gut microbiome of Boston Marathon runners after after completing the 26.2 race and in an independent group of 87 elite and Olympic athletes after competitions. Veillonella bacteria isolated from marathon athletes and given to mice increased the animals' performances in laboratory treadmill tests by 13% compared to control bacteria. (2019-06-24)

All human endurance activities share a common metabolic ceiling
In one of the first attempts to quantify the limits of human energy expenditure over time, researchers using data on athletes who competed in global endurance events report that human energy expenditure could not be sustained above 2.5 times the rate of metabolism at rest. The findings from Caitlin Thurber and colleagues suggest that all human activities share the same. (2019-06-05)

New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs
Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from. (2019-05-09)

Training for first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of blood vessels
Training for and completing a first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of major blood vessels, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The study found that older and slower runners benefit the most. (2019-05-03)

Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket
Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications. (2019-04-29)

Step it up: Does running cadence matter? Not as much as previously thought
Contrary to long-standing popular belief, running at a prescribed, one-size-fits-all ''optimal'' cadence doesn't play as big a role in speed and efficiency as once thought. (2019-03-27)

Stopwatch set for milestone marathon in 2032
The elusive sub-two hour marathon running mark will likely be first shattered by a male athlete in May 2032, according to a ground-breaking statistical study by Dr. Simon Angus from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. (2019-02-26)

Slower runners benefit most from elite methods
How much do high-tech shoes, special diets and exercises, drafting behind other runners and other strategies to improve your 'running economy' actually improve your finish time? A new study spells it out. The takeaway: The faster you are, the harder it is to get faster. (2019-02-12)

Is coronary artery calcification in highly active people like marathon runners associated with increased risk of death?
Some studies have suggested that people with high levels of physical activity way beyond current physical activity guidelines, such as marathon runners, can have significant build-up of calcium in the arteries of their heart called coronary artery calcification (CAC). But data are limited about the risk of death in these highly active people with CAC. This study included nearly 22,000 men (average age almost 52) with varying levels of self-reported physical activity and who underwent CAC scanning. (2019-01-30)

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral of the 2017 Paris marathon. (2019-01-03)

GVSU researcher compares running economy in Nike shoe, track spikes
Kyle Barnes, assistant professor of movement science at Grand Valley State University, has researched strategies to improve running economy and performance for years. He incorporated the Nike Vaporfly 4 percent shoes in his studies and in October published results in the journal Sports Medicine that validated Nike's original study results giving the shoe the 4 percent name, while at the same time, comparing the NVF to traditional track spikes worn during track racing. It's the first study to compare NVF with a spike shoe. (2018-12-12)

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