Current Marine Mammals News and Events | Page 25

Current Marine Mammals News and Events, Marine Mammals News Articles.
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NUS marine scientists find toxic bacteria on microplastics retrieved from tropical waters
A team of marine scientists from the National University of Singapore had uncovered toxic bacteria living on the surfaces of microplastics (which are pieces of plastic smaller than 5 millimetres in size) collected from the coastal areas of Singapore. These bacteria are capable of causing coral bleaching, and triggering wound infections in humans. The team also discovered a diversity of bacteria, including useful organisms - such as those that can degrade marine pollutants like hydrocarbons - in the plastic waste. (2019-02-11)

Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
A new program developed by researchers from Penn State and Microsoft Azure automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research. (2019-02-11)

Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago
The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually. (2019-02-11)

Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore. Should we simply leave them where they are and accept the risk of their slowly releasing toxic substances, or should we instead remove them, and run the risk of their falling apart -- or even exploding? (2019-02-08)

Sea snakes that can't drink seawater
New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall. (2019-02-08)

Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. For the first time, they succeeded in quantifying the amount of organic carbon transported into the deep sea by a single tectonic event, the giant Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011. The results have now been published in Scientific Reports. (2019-02-07)

Study explores new way to help increase conservation impact
A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world. (2019-02-07)

How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem
Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Seth Rudman, a postdoctoral researcher. The study represents a strategy for uncovering, and perhaps even predicting, the ecological implications of evolutionary change. (2019-02-06)

Differences in water temperature can create new marine species
Warm and cool water temperatures over a long stretch of coastline cause new species of marine fish to evolve without being isolated from similar types of fish nearby, according to a new international study. The findings challenge the long-held belief that new marine species can only evolve in isolated environments and provides a glimpse into the early stages of species formation in the sea. (2019-02-05)

Underwater forests threatened by future climate change, new study finds
Climate change could lead to declines of underwater kelp forests through impacts on their microbiome. New research has found predicted ocean warming and acidification can change microbes on the kelp surface, leading to disease and potentially putting fisheries at risk. (2019-02-05)

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony
The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories, is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. (2019-02-03)

China launched world's first rocket-deployed weather instruments from unmanned semi-submersible vehicle
For the first time in history, Chinese scientists have launched a rocketsonde -- a rocket designed to perform weather observations in areas beyond the range of weather balloons -- from an unmanned semi-submersible vehicle (USSV) that has been solely designed and specially developed by China for this task. (2019-01-31)

Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales
Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores. (2019-01-31)

What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?
A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan by University of Missouri (MU) Bond Life Sciences Center scientist Cheryl Rosenfeld could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome. (2019-01-31)

UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
A rare video, captured by the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) in January 2019 shows a humpback whale calf so new that its dorsal fin and tail flukes appear soft and flimsy, and its mother is still excreting blood, while sometimes supporting the calf on her back. It was the closest the marine mammal researcher had been to a live birth in 25 years. (2019-01-31)

The lamprey regenerates its spinal cord not just once -- but twice
Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists report that lampreys can regenerate the spinal cord and recover function after the spinal cord has been severed not just once, but twice in the same location. The study opens up a new path for identifying pro-regenerative molecules and potential therapeutic targets for human spinal cord injury. (2019-01-30)

Carbon dioxide emissions from global fisheries larger than previously thought
Carbon dioxide emissions from fuel burnt by fishing boats are 30 per cent higher than previously reported, researchers with the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia and the Sea Around Us -- Indian Ocean at the University of Western Australia have found. (2019-01-30)

Plastic pollution causes mussels to lose grip
A new study shows that microplastics are affecting the ability of mussels to attach themselves to their surroundings -- potentially having a devastating impact on ocean ecosystems as well as a worldwide industry worth between 3-4 billion US dollars per year. (2019-01-29)

NIH scientists explore tick salivary glands as tool to study virus transmission, infection
The salivary glands of some tick species could become important research tools for studying how viruses are transmitted from ticks to mammals, and for developing preventive medical countermeasures. Tick salivary glands usually block transmission, but a new study conducted at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH focuses on the role of salivary glands in spreading flaviviruses from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) to mammals. The new study appears in the journal mBio. (2019-01-29)

In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)

Crocodiles have complex past
A new study offers a different version to the evolutionary past of modern-day crocodiles and alligators. The study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, says crocodiles and alligators came from a variety of surroundings beginning in the early Jurassic Period, and various species occupied a host of ecosystems over time, including land, estuarine, freshwater and marine. (2019-01-24)

Breakthrough in understanding male infertility
Newcastle University experts have identified the importance of gene, RBMXL2, which is similar to an infertility gene found on the Y chromosome, in regulating the production of fully-functioning sperm. (2019-01-23)

Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other? (2019-01-22)

BFU physicists developed a method of determining the composition of microplastic in water
Physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) developed and applied a method of identifying microplastic collected in sea waters. The spectroscopy method allows to determine the chemical composition of contaminants regardless of their size. The article about the research was published in Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2019-01-21)

Otago researcher contributes piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution
An Otago researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a world-first study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors. (2019-01-21)

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. (2019-01-17)

Global change could also affect hake fisheries in Tierra del Fuego
A new scientific study suggests snoek (Thyrsites atun) can recolonize the marine area of the Beagle Channel and South-Western Atlantic waters, an area in the American continent where this species competed with the hake (Merluccius sp.) to hunt preys in warmer periods. The conclusions open a new scene of potential changes that can affect trophic networks in this marine region due the effect of the rise of ocean temperatures. (2019-01-17)

Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish
A University of Southampton research team has developed a map of chemicals found in Jellyfish caught across 1 million square-kilometres of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish. These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products were sourced from. (2019-01-16)

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection
More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a study published Jan. 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Abel Valdivia of the Center for Biological Diversity in California, and colleagues. (2019-01-16)

Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral
Researchers from the Centre Scientifique de Monaco (CSM), the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Kiel have succeeded in directly measuring three key parameters necessary for skeleton formation in a live tropical coral. This way, they completely characterized the carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification. The study has now been published in Science Advances. (2019-01-16)

Far-ranging fin whales find year-round residence in Gulf of California
Researchers from Mexico and the United States have concluded that a population of fin whales in the rich Gulf of California ecosystem may live there year-round -- an unusual circumstance for a whale species known to migrate across ocean basins. (2019-01-10)

Microplastics and plastic additives discovered in ascidians all along Israel's coastline
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that microplastics -- tiny pieces of plastic ingested by aquatic life -- are present in solitary ascidians, sac-like marine invertebrate filter feeders, all along the Israeli coastline. The research also confirmed the presence of plastic additives, i.e. 'plasticizers,' in ascidians. (2019-01-03)

Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida
Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico.  (2018-12-28)

Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity
Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over -- or having many other species die out. The answer, researchers say, lies in the soil found near individual trees, where natural 'enemies' of tree species reside. (2018-12-24)

More young and other traits help mammals adapt to urban environments
Species of mammals that live in urban environments produce more young compared to other mammals. But next to this common 'winning trait', mammals deal with different strategies to successfully inhabit cities. This is what Radboud University ecologist Luca Santini and colleagues found in a study that they will publish in Ecology Letters on 21 December. 'This is the first step of many to understand why certain mammals manage to live in cities and why other species don't.' (2018-12-21)

Huge reserves of iron in Western Siberia might originate from under an ancient sea
World's largest Bakchar iron ore deposit is located at the place of an ancient sea in West Siberia, Russia. Its proven reserves are over 28 billion tons. Scientists search for an answer to a global question: Where from and how was there the accumulation of a huge amount of iron. Researchers propose the origin of the Bakchar ironstone deposit by upward migration of a mixture of Fe-rich brine and hydrothermal fluid through marine sediments. (2018-12-21)

Lipid raft components offer potential cholesterol-lowering drug target
Excessive dietary cholesterol (and its uptake) can cause hypercholesterolemia. In a new paper, researchers show that intestinal cholesterol absorption requires the complex lipid GM3. Disrupting GM3 synthesis can reduce the incidence of high cholesterol in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, suggesting the pathway as a lipid-lowering drug target. (2018-12-20)

For gait transitions, stability often trumps energy savings
Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions. (2018-12-20)

Not all marine protected areas are created equal
Europe's impressive network of marine protected areas (MPAs), which now cover 29 percent of territorial waters, is not as effective as has been thought at preserving the marine biodiversity it was created to protect. (2018-12-20)

The idiosyncratic mammalian diversification after extinction of the dinosaurs
Researchers state that many mammals lineages coexisted with the dinosaurs before the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Although many species of mammals also disappeared in the extinction event, several lineages survived. (2018-12-20)

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