Current Marshes News and Events

Current Marshes News and Events, Marshes News Articles.
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Climate change increases coastal blue carbon sequestration
Coastal wetlands are important ecosystems, especially in mitigating climate change. Prof. Faming Wang from South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Sanders from Southern Cross University,Australia worked together with several colleagues around the globe to examine coastal blue carbon burial rates. They showed that climate change will increase the carbon sequestration capacity of these systems around the world during this century. (2021-01-25)

More than half of Hudson River tidal marshes were created accidentally by humans
In a new study of tidal marsh resilience to sea level rise, geologist and first author Brian Yellen at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues observed that Hudson River Estuary marshes are growing upward at a rate two to three times faster than sea level rise, ''suggesting that they should be resilient to accelerated sea level rise in the future,'' he says. (2020-12-18)

Workshop collaboration aims to move tidal marsh research forward
Tidal marshes play a significant role in coastal ecosystems. They are a nursery ground for juvenile fishes and a line of defense in coastal erosion. However, there is still a great deal not known about tidal marshes. In November 2019, 65 scientists, managers, and restoration practitioners converged at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to see where tidal marsh research has been and where it needs to go. (2020-11-09)

Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century. (2020-10-27)

Land development in New Jersey continues to slow
Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. (2020-09-09)

Hots dogs, chicken wings and city living helped wetland wood storks thrive
Using the Wood Stork, researchers compared city storks with natural wetland storks to gauge their success in urban environments based on their diet and food opportunities. Results provide evidence of how a wetland species persists and even thrives in an urban environment by switching to human foods like chicken wings and hots dogs when natural marshes are in bad shape. These findings indicate that urban areas can buffer a species from the unpredictability of natural food sources. (2020-08-31)

Burrowing crabs reshaping salt marshes, with climate change to blame
Given higher sea levels and softer soil in the wake of a shifting climate, Sesarma crabs, which have already decimated salt marshes in the Northeast, are now rising to prominence in southeastern marshes, a new study finds. (2020-07-13)

Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can save lives in the future
By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team led by scientists from the Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Delft University of Technology, Deltares and Antwerp University, reveal in a publication this week in Nature Sustainability that the value of nature for flood defense has actually been evident for hundreds of years. (2020-06-29)

Mississippi Delta marshes in a state of irreversible collapse, Tulane study shows
A key finding of the study, published in Science Advances, is that coastal marshes experience tipping points, where a small increase in the rate of sea-level rise leads to widespread submergence. (2020-05-22)

A friendlier way to deal with nitrate pollution
Learning from nature, scientists from the Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan and the Korean Basic Science Institute (KBSI) have found a catalyst that efficiently transforms nitrate into nitrite -- an environmentally important reaction -- without requiring high temperature or acidity, and now have identified the mechanism that makes this efficiency possible. (2020-04-02)

Fresh groundwater flow important for coastal ecosystems
Groundwater is the largest source of freshwater, one of the world's most precious natural resources and vital for crops and drinking water. Researchers led by Göttingen University developed the first global computer model of groundwater flow into the world's oceans. Their analysis shows 20% of the world's coastal ecosystems - such as estuaries, salt marshes and coral reefs - are at risk of pollutants transported by groundwater flow from the land to the sea. Research appeared in Nature Communications. (2020-03-09)

Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed. (2020-02-28)

Wetlands will keep up with sea level rise to offset climate change
Sediment accrual rates in coastal wetlands will outpace sea level rise, enabling wetlands to increase their capacity to sequester carbon, a study from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, shows. (2019-12-19)

High carbon dioxide can create 'shrinking stems' in marshes
For most plants, carbon dioxide acts like a steroid: The more they can take in, the bigger they get. But in a new study published Sept. 25, 2019, scientists with the Smithsonian discovered something strange happening in marshes. Under higher levels of carbon dioxide, instead of producing bigger stems, marsh plants produced more stems that were noticeably smaller. (2019-09-25)

Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution
Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. A new study from the MBL Ecosystems Center indicates nitrate pollution of coastal waters stimulates the decomposition of organic matter in salt marsh sediments that normally would have remained stable, and can alter the capacity of salt marshes to sequester carbon over the long term. (2019-08-23)

How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is an important nutrient in marine environments with billions of tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton (microscopic plant-like cells), seaweed, corals and bacteria. (2019-08-19)

Ancient feces reveal how 'marsh diet' left Bronze Age Fen folk infected with parasites
'Coprolites' from the Must Farm archaeological excavation in East Anglia, UK, shows the prehistoric inhabitants were infected by parasitic worms that can be spread by eating raw fish, frogs and shellfish. (2019-08-15)

Sea level rise requires extra management to maintain salt marshes
Salt marshes are important habitats for fish and birds and protect coasts under sea level rise against stronger wave attacks. However, marshes themselves are much more vulnerable than previously thought. Stronger waves due to sea level rise can not only reduce the marsh extent by erosion of the marsh edge, but these waves hamper plant re-establishment on neighboring tidal flats, making it much more difficult for the marsh to recover and grow again. (2019-07-17)

Salt regulation among saltmarsh sparrows evolved in 4 unique ways
A new study in Evolution Letters finds that different bird species in the same challenging environment -- the highly saline ecosystem of tidal marshes along ocean shores -- were able to evolve unique species-specific ways to address the same problem. (2019-07-16)

Dead roots double shoreline loss in gulf
A new Duke University-led study finds that the loss of marsh-edge salt grasses and mangroves due to disturbances such as heavy oiling from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill doubles the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes. (2019-05-24)

The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish, described based on genetics
A study led by researchers at the Doñana Biological Station of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), in collaboration with institutions in Europe, America and Asia, has identified the main introduction routes of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, during its global-scale invasion. This North American species is the most widely spread freshwater crayfish worldwide, and is one of the worst invasive species due to its impact on the structure and functioning of freshwater ecosystems. (2019-05-16)

How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests
Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation. (2019-05-09)

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Nine years ago tomorrow -- April 20, 2010 -- crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands. (2019-04-19)

Climate change threatens endangered sparrows
A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that some sparrow species will go extinct within the century due to climate change. (2019-04-16)

Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features
By analyzing thousands of declassified images from Cold War-era U2 spy missions, Emily Hammer of the University of Pennsylvania and Jason Ur of Harvard University discovered archaeological features like prehistoric hunting traps, 3,000-year-old irrigation canals, and hidden 60-year-old marsh villages. They also created an online tool that allows other researchers to identify and access the photos for the first time. (2019-04-08)

Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic
Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules -- a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market -- could lead to unintended consequences. (2019-02-26)

Study yields new clues to predict tipping points for marsh survival
Sea-level rise, sediment starvation and other environmental woes pose increasing threats to coastal wetlands worldwide. But a new Duke study could help stem the losses by giving scientists a broader understanding of which wetlands are most at risk and why. The study assessed wetland distribution and resilience in hundreds of US estuaries at five different spatial scales. Its findings will help guide future efforts to preserve or restore threatened wetlands. (2019-02-13)

Study examines black mangroves impact on the salt marsh food web
Warmer temperatures are causing more tropical species to move northward. Among these are black mangroves, whose abundance is steadily increasing in the northern Gulf of Mexico. An article published this month, Tropicalization of the barrier islands of the northern Gulf of Mexico: A comparison of herbivory and decomposition rates between smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) and black mangrove (Avicennia germinans), examines how this tropical species is impacting the salt marsh food web. (2019-01-15)

Archeological discovery yields clues to how our ancestors may have adapted to their environment
During the Stone Age ancestral humans lived with a variety of animal species along what was an area of wetlands in the middle of the Jordanian desert. The site, in the town of Azraq Basin, has been excavated and has revealed an abundance of tools and animal bones from up to 250,000 years ago, leading to better understanding of how ancestral humans have adapted to this changing environment. (2019-01-03)

Why is sea level rising faster in some places along the US East Coast than others?
Sea levels are rising globally from ocean warming and melting of land ice, but the seas aren't rising at the same rate everywhere. Sea levels have risen significantly faster in some US East Coast regions compared to others. A new study led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals why. (2018-12-19)

Scientists to present new long-term ecological research findings
New results presented by National Science Foundation (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) scientists at the 2018 American Geophysical Union fall meeting reveal hidden realms in ice-covered lakes and deep soils. The conference will take place from Dec. 10 to Dec. 14 in Washington, D.C. (2018-12-12)

New US study reveals natural solutions can reduce global warming
A new study found that 21 percentof the United States' greenhouse gas pollution (1.2 Pg CO2e year) could be removed through enhanced management of forest, grassland, agricultural, and coastal areas. An offset at this level would be the equivalent to pollution from every single US car and truck on the road. (2018-11-14)

White line of algae deaths marks uplift in 2016 Chilean earthquake
A bleached fringe of dead marine algae, strung along the coastlines of two islands off the coast of Chile, offers a unique glimpse at how the land rose during the 2016 magnitude 7.6 Chiloé earthquake, according to a new study in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2018-11-06)

Climate change efforts should focus on ocean-based solutions
The first broad-scale assessment of ocean-based measures to reduce atmospheric CO2, counteract ocean warming and/or reduce ocean acidification and sea-level rise shows their high potential to mitigate climate change and its impacts. The study identifies ocean-based renewable energy as the most promising, and several local marine conservation and restoration options as 'no-regret measures', that should be scaled-up and implemented immediately, but concludes all other measures are still too uncertain to recommend without further research. (2018-10-04)

Invasive plants can boost blue carbon storage
When invasive species enter the picture, things are rarely black and white. A new paper has revealed that some plant invaders could help fight climate change by making it easier for ecosystems to store 'blue carbon' -- the carbon stored in coastal environments like salt marshes, mangroves and seagrasses. But other invaders, most notably animals, can do the exact opposite. (2018-10-01)

How some algae may survive climate change
Green algae that evolved to tolerate hostile and fluctuating conditions in salt marshes and inland salt flats are expected to survive climate change, thanks to hardy genes they stole from bacteria, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2018-09-28)

Amazon mangrove forest stores twice as much carbon per acre as region's famous rainforest
Scientists have determined for the first time that Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's famous rainforest. (2018-09-27)

Urbanization is cutting off life support to NYC's wetlands
Using sediment cores to trace the evolution of Jamaica Bay's wetlands, a team led by researchers within Columbia's Earth Institute finds that urbanization is weakening the shoreline and starving the marshes of vital mineral sediment, causing their gradual but dramatic erosion. (2018-09-24)

Coastal wetlands will survive rising seas, but only if we let them
A global study addresses a major uncertainty in how saltmarshes and mangroves will respond to sea-level rise; stresses importance of preserving 'accommodation space' for landward migration. (2018-09-20)

Global coastal wetlands need to move inland in fight against climate change
Up to 30 per cent of coastal wetlands could be lost globally by the year 2100 with a dramatic effect on global warming and coastal flooding, if action is not taken to protect them, new research warns. (2018-09-12)

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