Current Mate News and Events

Current Mate News and Events, Mate News Articles.
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Is odor the secret to bats' sex appeal?
A literature review revealed that odor-producing glands and tissues in bats may play a prominent role in mating behavior (2021-02-18)

Lemurs show there's no single formula for lasting love
Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate -- some lemurs and other animals do, too. Duke researchers are mapping the hormone receptors that underlie these primates' ability to pair up for the long haul. Their findings suggest the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others. (2021-02-12)

Computer love
In your quest for true love and that elusive happily ever after, are you waiting for the ''right'' person to come along, or do you find yourself going for the cutest guy or girl in the room, hoping things will work out? Do you leave your options open, hoping to ''trade-up'' at the next opportunity, or do you invest in your relationship with an eye on the cost-benefits analysis? (2021-02-12)

Songbirds exposed to lead-contaminated water show telltale signs about human impacts
Researchers discovered lead levels like those reported in Flint, Michigan, can interfere with the neural mechanisms of vocal development of songbirds and affect mate attraction. (2021-02-04)

Traffic noise makes mating crickets less picky
New research has found that the mating behaviour of crickets is significantly affected by traffic noise and other man-made sounds. When man-made noise pollution was present, the females didn't take into account the courtship song of the male crickets during mating. As the courtship song is energetically costly and provides crucial information about the health of the male, this could affect long-term population viability as females could choose less suitable mates. (2021-02-01)

A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science. (2020-12-22)

Shipworms' competitive sex frenzy caught on film
A competitive sexual frenzy in which bigger appendages have the most success of reproducing might sound like the briefing for a porn film, but instead, it's the finding of a new study examining a clam. Scientists, led by Dr Reuben Shipway, at the University of Portsmouth, studying the sex life of the giant feathery shipworm may be the first to have witnessed the wrestling and sparring between individuals during copulation. (2020-12-09)

Loyal couples in the rainforest
Coppery titi monkeys do not deceive their partners (2020-11-23)

Two genes regulate social dominance
Using the Nobel Prize gene-editing technique, a University of Houston researcher has found that two genes regulate social dominance in cichlid fish and - possibly - humans. (2020-11-10)

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows. (2020-11-09)

Secrets of 'smasher shrimp' property ladder revealed
Mantis shrimps carefully survey burrows before trying to evict rivals, new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Dull-colored birds don't see the world like colorful birds do
Bengalese finches -- also called the Society finch -- are a species of brown, black and white birds that don't rely on colorful signals when choosing a mate. Consequently, when presented with a color-perception test that their bright red-beaked cousins the Zebra finches routinely ace, they seem to be paying more attention to differences in brightness than hue. (2020-10-28)

Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists at Ludwig-Maximlians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences. (2020-10-06)

Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
Research led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath found that a range of factors affected the fidelity and parenting behaviour of plovers, rather than being defined by the species. (2020-09-28)

These birds communicate by fluttering their feathers -- and they have different accents
Fork-tailed Flycatchers, scientists just discovered, communicate with the sounds made when they flutter their feathers. And by analyzing recordings of the birds in flight, the researchers found that subspecies with different migration patterns have different ''dialects'' to their feather sounds, possibly helping contribute to them splitting into separate species. (2020-09-22)

What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. This paper provides a detailed look at the predator-prey relationship between bats and katydids, a group of insects related to crickets and grasshoppers. (2020-08-28)

Angels in disguise: Angelfishes hybridize more than any other coral reef species
A new study highlights the remarkably high incidence of and tendency toward hybridisation in the angelfish family (even between divergent species), more so than in any other group of coral reef fishes. (2020-08-04)

Loss of adaptive immunity helps deep sea anglerfish fuse with their mates
The discovery of altered adaptive immunity in anglerfish helps explain how the creatures are able to temporarily or permanently fuse with their mates without experiencing immune rejection. (2020-07-30)

Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex
Two groups of nerve cells may serve as ''on-off switches'' for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. These neurons appear to send signals between two parts of the brain - the back tip, or posterior, of the amygdala and the hypothalamus - that together regulate emotions including fear, anxiety, and aggression. (2020-07-27)

UNH scientists find faster way to count animal sperm using DNA
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have identified a quicker and less expensive way to count sperm in lobsters that could help scientists looking at any animal better understand mating, a key aspect of species survival. (2020-07-17)

Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species
In a new meta-study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have published ground-breaking findings on the effects of climate change for fish stock around the globe. (2020-07-02)

Spanish language increasingly more relevant to presidential elections
Discourse in and about Spanish was present on both sides of the political spectrum, more so leading up to the 2016 presidential election than in previous cycles, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-01)

Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows
Researchers think that local parasites are influencing why barn swallows in Europe, the Middle East and Colorado are choosing their mates differently. Their new research finds that these parasites could be playing an important role in changing the traits displayed to attract mates early in the process of the creation of new species. (2020-06-24)

Size matters in the sex life of salmon
For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. Larger males and females that may spend up to four years at sea produce many more babies, but they are very rare compared to younger fish. (2020-06-23)

A changing mating signal may initiate speciation in populations of Drosophila mojavensis
When choosing a mate, females of different subspecies of Drosophila mojavensis recognize the right mating partners either mainly by their song or by their smell. New species apparently evolve when the chemical mating signal is altered and when, in turn, the signal is reinterpreted by the opposite sex in the context of other signals, such as the courtship song. (2020-06-17)

'Playing hard to get' really works; here's why
A team of researchers from the University of Rochester and the Israeli-based Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya examined the effects of playing hard to get, a mating strategy that is likely to instill a certain degree of uncertainty. In a new study they show that making the chase harder increases a potential mate's desirability. (2020-06-08)

Two lefties make a right -- if you are a one-in-a-million garden snail
A global campaign to help find a mate for a left-coiling snail called 'Jeremy' has enabled scientists to understand how mirror-image garden snails are formed. The findings, published today in the journal Biology Letters, show that the rare left-spiralling shell of some garden snails is usually a development accident, rather than an inherited condition. (2020-06-02)

Sex as stress management in microbes
Why is sex so popular in nature? A new article in Genome Biology and Evolution suggests that the molecular mechanisms underlying sex and the stress response may be more tightly coupled than previously appreciated, providing a new explanation for the widespread prevalence of sex in nature. (2020-05-21)

New algorithm predicts optimal materials among all possible compounds
Skoltech researchers have offered a solution to the problem of searching for materials with required properties among all possible combinations of chemical elements. These combinations are virtually endless, and each has an infinite multitude of possible crystal structures; it is not feasible to test them all and choose the best option (for instance, the hardest compound) either in an experiment or in silico. (2020-05-14)

Are our brains hard-wired for longing?
A new brain imaging study of prairie voles -- which are among only about 5% of mammalian species besides humans who are monogamous -- found that when it comes to forming bonds, longing may be as important as being together. The study also sheds light on why it's so hard to social distance, and could lead to new therapies for conditions like autism and depression. (2020-05-11)

Fishing can disrupt mating systems
In many fish species body size plays an important role in sexual selection. Large individuals are preferred mating partners because they can enhance offspring survival by providing better quality resources than small individuals. While large females and males are often favored by sexual selection, fishing targets and removes these reproductively superior individuals. Academy Research Fellow Silva Uusi-Heikkilä discusses in her recent literature review the implications fisheries selection might have on sexual selection, individual reproductive success and population viability. (2020-05-08)

A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
The origins of paternal care, a key differentiator between humans and other primates, have long been tied to ancestral females trading their own sexual fidelity for food provided by their mates. A new theory developed by economists and anthropologists states that ecological changes, beginning roughly 5-8 million years ago, placed a premium on partnerships - both between and within sexes - and fueled the emergence of males who provided food for their offspring. (2020-04-27)

Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika. (2020-04-16)

Flamingos form firm friendships
Flamingos form friendships that last for years, new research shows. (2020-04-14)

Exploring why males are larger than females among mammals
In most animals, females are larger than males, but in most mammals, males are larger than females. A new analysis published in Mammal Review examines the potential drivers of these differences. (2020-04-08)

How animals understand numbers influences their chance of survival
While they can't pick out precise numbers, animals can comprehend that more is, well, more. In a Review publishing March 30 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Andreas Nieder, a neurobiologist at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, explores the current literature on how different animal species comprehend numbers and the impact on their survival, arguing that we won't fully understand the influence of numerical competence unless we study it directly. (2020-03-30)

FSU research shows guppies help their brothers when it comes to the opposite se
In a new study published by a Florida State University team, researchers found that male Trinidadian guppies observe a form of nepotism when it comes to pursuing the opposite sex. These tiny tropical fish often help their brothers in the mating process by darting in front of other males to block access to a female. (2020-03-26)

More men, more problems? Not necessarily, FSU study finds
Men are more prone to competitive risk taking and violent behavior, so what happens when the number of men is greater than the number of women in a population? According to research by Florida State University Professor of Psychology Jon Maner, the answers might not be what you expect. (2020-03-24)

Love rivals risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations
Males that face tougher competition for females risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations in their genome than males without rivals. Researchers at Uppsala University have discovered this correlation in the beetle species Callosobruchus maculatus. Their study is published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-03-16)

Can traumatic memories be erased?
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that Drosophila flies lose long-term memory (LTM) of a traumatic event when kept in the dark, the first confirmation of environmental light playing a role in LTM maintenance. The team also identified the specific molecular mechanism responsible for this effect. LTMs are notoriously difficult to erase; this work may lead to novel treatments for sufferers of trauma, perhaps even the erasure of life-altering traumatic memories. (2020-03-14)

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