Current Maternal Mortality News and Events

Current Maternal Mortality News and Events, Maternal Mortality News Articles.
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New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

Terrestrial laser scanning for monitoring hydrological cycle of trees
Water is an essential element for all living things. Understanding the dynamics of water in trees is crucial for understanding the consequences of climate change and altered water availability for forest ecosystems. A joint research project with Samuli Junttila PhD, and Professor Masato Katoh of Shinshu University's Institute for Mountain Science and others demonstrates a new laser scanning based method that can be used to monitor changes in leaf water content of tree communities. (2021-02-22)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

Low-quality maternal diet during pregnancy may be associated with late-childhood obesity
Eating a low quality diet, high in foods and food components associated with chronic inflammation, during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of obesity and excess body fat in children, especially during late-childhood. The findings are published the open access journal BMC Medicine. (2021-02-21)

COVID-19 may have caused the loss of more than 20.5 million years of life worldwide
A study by a group researchers from several international universities and research centres, including lecturers from the UPF Department of Economics and Business, has estimated the premature mortality impact of covid-19. It has done so by calculating years of life lost (YLL) due to covid-19 compared to YLL for other common illnesses, such as the flu or cardiovascular diseases. (2021-02-19)

To reduce stunting in India, space out births
Adequate spacing between births can help to alleviate the likelihood of stunting in children, according to a new study from TCI. Sunaina Dhingra and Prabhu Pingali find that differences in height between firstborn and later-born children may be due to inadequate time between births. When children are born at least three years after their older siblings, the height gap between them disappears. (2021-02-17)

Mother's heart health in pregnancy impacts child's heart health in adolescence
A mother's heart health while she is pregnant may have a significant impact on her child's cardiovascular health in early adolescence (ages 10 to 14), according to a new study. It is the first study to examine the implications of a mother's cardiovascular health during pregnancy for offspring health in the longer term. (2021-02-16)

People with and without AD have a different threshold for elective revascularisation
The risk of both mortality and rehospitalisation after an elective revascularisation procedure for coronary artery disease is similar for people with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD), but people with AD had worse outcomes after an emergency procedure, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2021-02-15)

The impact of COVID-19 on motherhood
A new study explores the impact that the stress and isolation brought on by COVID-19 has had on people who were pregnant or gave birth during the pandemic. Many of those surveyed last summer reported additional stress brought on by disinformation in hospitals and lack of support with childcare and infant feeding. (2021-02-15)

Researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability
Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. (2021-02-11)

Depressed moms who breastfeed boost babies' mood, neuroprotection and mutual touch
Feeding method and affectionate touch patterns in depressed and non-depressed mothers and babies as well as infant's EEG activity showed that mother-infant affectionate touch differed as a function of mood and feeding method (breastfeeding and bottle-feeding). Infants in the depressed and bottle-fed group reduced touch toward their mothers while breastfeeding had a positive effect on both mother and baby. Infants of depressed and breastfeeding mothers showed neither behavioral nor brain development dysregulation previously found in infants of depressed mothers. (2021-02-10)

Vitamin D supplementation: possible gain in life years combined with cost savings
Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now calculated: If all Germans over the age of 50 were to take vitamin D supplements, up to 30,000 cancer deaths per year could possibly be avoided and more than 300,000 years of life could be gained - in addition, health care costs could be saved. (2021-02-10)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

Computational medicine -- moving from uncertainty to precision
An innovative partnership at The University of Texas at Austin takes aim at medicine down to the individual level by applying state-of-the-art computation to medical care. (2021-02-10)

Lessons from the flu season
Australian researchers have come up with two key recommendations from studies of the annual influenza season - one highlighting the benefits of antivirals in reducing repeat hospitalisation, and the other to watch for underlying cardiovascular disease. While the world focuses on the rising COVID-19 death toll, seasonal influenza continues to cause significant mortality and poses a significant economic burden every year. (2021-02-10)

Breast cancer death rates stop declining in younger women
Breast cancer death rates have stopped declining for women in the U.S. younger than age 40, ending a trend that existed from 1987 to 2010, according to a new study. Researchers expressed hope that the findings would raise awareness of breast cancer in younger women and spur research into the causes behind the change. (2021-02-09)

Paid maternity leave has long-term health benefits
A study of women who were new mothers in the late 1970s found that those who were given longer, paid maternity leave lived healthier lives as they entered middle age. (2021-02-09)

Nitrate in maternal drinking water may impair fetal growth
Women whose household drinking water contained nitrate had babies that weighed, on average, 10 grams less than babies born to mothers where household water had no detectible nitrate, according to a new study. Even low nitrate levels -- about half of the allowable level set by the US Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA -- caused an adverse effect. (2021-02-09)

Breastfeeding mothers produce COVID-19 antibodies capable of neutralizing virus
Breastfeeding women with COVID-19 do not pass along the SARS-CoV-2 virus in their milk but do transfer milk-borne antibodies that are able to neutralize the virus, a multi-institutional team of researchers led by the University of Idaho reported. (2021-02-09)

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2. TMPRSS2, a gene that codes for an enzyme critical for aiding the entry of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells, had 60% higher levels of expression in Down syndrome. The researchers also found higher expression levels for CXCL10, a gene that can trigger cytokine storms. The authors call to vaccinate people with Down syndrome against COVID-19 as a priority. (2021-02-08)

Higher excess COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes
A largescale analysis led by the University of Exeter and funded by Diabetes UK, has found a disproportionately higher COVID-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, raising questions over vaccination strategies across Europe. (2021-02-08)

Raised mortality from cardiac arrest in people with COVID-19
Sudden cardiac arrest is more often fatal in people with COVID-19, a new study shows. Those responsible for the research see the results as a wake-up call for the public and care providers alike. (2021-02-05)

New study finds cage-free egg-laying hen mortality declines over time
New research published today in the journal Scientific Reports based on the largest-to-date analysis of commercial data on egg-laying hen mortality finds that survival rates in higher-welfare cage-free housing systems increase over time as managers gain experience and knowledge accrues. These findings will reframe the debate on the welfare of laying hens and on the evolution of the egg industry. (2021-02-04)

In vitro study helps explain how Zika virus passes from mother to fetus during pregnancy
A preclinical study by a University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine team has discovered a new mechanism for how Zika virus can pass from mothers to their children during pregnancy - a process known as vertical transmission. The researchers showed, for the first time, that specialized maternal cells lining the uterus (decidual cells) act as reservoirs for trimester-dependent transmission of the virus through the placenta. (2021-02-03)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Maternal mental health needs attention during COVID-19 lockdowns
Mothers are at increased risk of mental health problems as they struggle to balance the demands of childcare and remote working in COVID-19 lockdowns, according to new research from an international team of researchers. (2021-02-03)

Research findings can help to increase population size of endangered species
The findings of a new study examining the behaviours of alligator and caiman hatchlings have enhanced our understanding of how we can conserve, and increase, the population of endangered crocodilian species. (2021-02-03)

Study shows aspirin before a diagnosis may lower colorectal cancer mortality
A new study finds that long-term aspirin use before a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) may be associated with lower CRC-specific mortality. (2021-02-02)

Survival tip: Start at normal weight and slowly add pounds
People who start adulthood with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range and move later in life to being overweight - but never obese - tend to live the longest, a new study suggests. Adults in this category lived longer than even those whose BMI stayed in the normal range throughout their life. Those who started adulthood as obese and continued to add weight had the highest mortality rate. (2021-02-02)

Changes in economic prosperity, cardiovascular mortality
County-level mortality and economic data were used to investigate the association between changes in economic prosperity and rates of cardiovascular mortality among middle-age U.S. adults from 2010 to 2017. (2021-02-02)

Latest review shows intensive care mortality from COVID-19 continued to fall in 2020, but improvement is slowing
A meta-analysis of global studies published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that intensive care morality from COVID-19 has continued to fall since the start of the pandemic, but the improvement is slowing and may have plateaued. (2021-02-01)

COVID-19 intensive care mortality in Sweden lower than in many studies from other countries
New research reveals that the COVID-19 intensive care (ICU) mortality rate in Sweden was lower during the first wave of the pandemic than in many studies from other countries. (2021-02-01)

Assessment of maternal, neonatal cord blood SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, placental transfer ratios
Maternally derived antibodies are a key element of neonatal immunity. This study examined the association between maternal and neonatal SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody concentrations because understanding the dynamics of maternal antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy and subsequent transplacental antibody transfer can inform neonatal management as well as maternal vaccination strategies. (2021-01-29)

Medicaid expansion in New York has improved maternal health, study finds
A new Columbia University study has found that Medicaid expansion in 2014 in New York State was associated with a statistically significant reduction in severe maternal morbidity in low-income women during delivery hospitalizations compared with high-income women. The decrease was even more pronounced in racial and ethnic minority women than in White women. Until now there was little research on the link between ACA Medicaid expansion and maternal health outcomes. (2021-01-29)

Specific bacteria in the gut prompt mother mice to neglect their pups
As scientists learn more about the microorganisms that colonize the body--collectively called the microbiota--one area of intense interest is the effect that these microbes can have on the brain. A new study led by Salk Institute scientists has identified a strain of E. coli bacteria that, when living in the guts of female mice, causes them to neglect their offspring. The findings were published January 29, 2021, in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-29)

Women who develop high blood pressure after birth at greater risk of chronic hypertension
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh will unveil findings that suggest that women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy and who continue to have elevated blood pressure postpartum are at an increased risk for developing chronic hypertension. (2021-01-29)

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care. The study estimates a large increase in nursing home mortality. (2021-01-28)

First study to look at potency of maternal antibodies
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers will unveil findings that suggest that women who contract COVID-19 during pregnancy are able to make antibodies, but that transfer of these antibodies to their infants is less than expected. (2021-01-28)

New research finds severity of COVID-19 determines likelihood of pregnancy complications
Researchers will unveil findings that suggest that pregnant women who become severely or critically ill due to COVID-19 are at greater risk of dying and experiencing serious pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women who have COVID-19 but were asymptomatic, or without symptoms. In contrast, pregnant women with mild or moderate illness were not at higher risk of pregnancy complications than those without symptoms. (2021-01-28)

COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
The study followed 240 pregnant women between March and June 2020 and found that the COVID-19 mortality rate in the pregnant women was significantly higher when compared to the COVID-19 mortality rate in similarly aged individuals within Washington state. (2021-01-27)

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