Current Maternity Care News and Events | Page 2

Current Maternity Care News and Events, Maternity Care News Articles.
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Residencies must train residents to treat substance use disorder among pregnant women
Early-career family physicians who both provide maternity care and prescribe buprenorphine -- a medication used to treat opioid use disorder -- primarily completed their training in a small number of residency programs. As data about the risks of maternal mortality from substance use disorder emerges, it will be important to increase training opportunities in family medicine residencies to meet the needs of pregnant women with substance use disorder. (2020-03-09)

Paid maternity leave has mental and physical health benefits for mothers and children
Paid maternity leave has major mental and physical health benefits for mothers and children - including reduced rates of postpartum depression and infant mortality, according to a report in the March/April issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-03-09)

Improved access to Midwifery Units is urgently needed, says new study
A high number of pregnant women in England cannot access the maternity care most appropriate for them, according to a new study, which could be costing the NHS millions of pounds a year. The research, which is published in the BMJ Open, reviewed NHS maternity services in different areas of England and identified a number of key factors that limit the availability and use of Midwifery Units, (home-like settings run by midwives). (2020-02-19)

Parenting elective lets physicians spend more time with their babies
A novel, four-week parenting rotation designed for pediatric residents has dramatically increased the amount of time resident parents can spend at home with their babies, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-02-19)

'Birth Settings' report explores medical disparities of childbirth in the US
A report released earlier this month dives deep into the ongoing inequities surrounding childbirth in the US, with Oregon emerging as a leading example of how to do better. (2020-02-17)

Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy connected to elevated risk of ADHD
According to a study conducted in Finland, the risk of ADHD was 34 percent higher in children whose mother had a vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy than in those children whose mother's vitamin D level was sufficient during the first and second trimesters. The result was adjusted for maternal age, socioeconomic status and psychiatric history. (2020-02-10)

Menopause timing hard to determine in every third woman
Is it possible to investigate menopausal age, or not? In more than one in three women aged 50, the body provides no clear answer about the menopause, Swedish study shows. Increased use of hormonal intrauterine devices and contraceptive pills are the cause. (2020-02-07)

New study highlights prevalence of PTSD among obstetricians and gynaecologists
A new University of Liverpool led study, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology today (Tuesday, 28 January 2020), has revealed the prevalence of work-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among obstetricians and gynaecologists. (2020-01-27)

Maternal depression on rise in poor countries
Women in low and medium-income countries struggle with many health issues in pregnancy and childbirth, but little attention is given to antenatal depression -- which is on the rise in many developing countries, new PLOS ONE paper shows. A study by Flinders University public health researchers found rising levels of reported antenatal depression in these countries, and recommends more services are urgently needed -- particularly in low-income economies. (2020-01-21)

Recurrent miscarriage: Diabetes drug could lead to new treatment
A drug designed to tackle diabetes could also be repurposed as the first treatment to prevent miscarriage by targeting the lining of the womb itself, according to a clinical trial led by the University of Warwick. (2020-01-09)

Commercial weight management groups could support women to manage their weight after giving birth
Women who were overweight at the start of their pregnancy would welcome support after they have given birth in the form of commercial weight management groups, University of Warwick-led research has found. (2020-01-06)

Having a baby may cost some families $4,500 out-of-pocket
One of the most expensive parts of having a baby may involve the birth itself, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests. (2020-01-06)

Rural women at higher risk of life-threatening pregnancy complications
Women in rural communities experience higher rates of life-threatening complications during or after childbirth than mothers in urban cities, a new study finds. (2019-12-04)

Life, liberty -- and access to microbes?
Poverty increases the risk for numerous diseases by limiting people's access to healthy food, environments and stress-free conditions. In a new essay published Nov. 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Suzanne Ishaq and colleagues at the University of Oregon, argue that poverty also compromises health by creating unequal access to beneficial microorganisms. The essay is part of the 'Microbiomes Across Systems' special issue. (2019-11-26)

Study shows lower mortality from induction of labor at 41 weeks
Inducing labor after 41 instead of 42 full weeks' pregnancy appears to be safer in terms of perinatal survival, new Swedish research shows. The current study is expected to provide a key piece of evidence for upcoming decisions in maternity care. (2019-11-21)

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. (2019-11-19)

Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)

A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)

Newborn baby hiccups could be key to brain development
Each time a newborn baby hiccups, it triggers a large wave of brain signals which could help the baby learn how to regulate their breathing, finds a new UCL-led study published in Clinical Neurophysiology. (2019-11-11)

Evidence backs women's choice on where to have their babies
Healthy women have more than twice the chance of a normal labour and birth in a planned birth centre birth compared to a planned hospital birth, a major Australian study has found. The study of more than 1.2 million Australian births was led by Professor Caroline Homer of the Centre for Midwifery, Child and Family Health at UTS. It is the first comprehensive examination of maternal and perinatal outcomes from three birth settings across Australia. (2019-10-29)

Maternal and newborn health improves in rural Nigeria, Ethiopia and India but inequities still exist
Community-based health programs in parts of rural Nigeria, Ethiopia and India were successful in improving health care for mothers and newborns, but inequities still exist, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-28)

How bats relocate in response to tree loss
Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. In a recent Journal of Wildlife Management study, researchers examined the movement of a maternity colony of big brown bats as a response to naturally occurring tree loss. (2019-10-09)

The Lancet: Evidence of mistreatment of women during childbirth in four low-income countries
Physical and verbal abuse during childbirth peaked between 30 minutes before birth until 15 minutes after birth, and mistreatment was more common in younger, less educated women, according to a study in The Lancet which combined observations of 2,016 women during labour and childbirth with surveys of 2,672 women post-childbirth in Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar, and Nigeria. (2019-10-08)

New evidence on the mistreatment of women during childbirth
New evidence from a World Health Organization (WHO)-led study in four countries shows more than one-third of women experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities. The study, led by Dr. Meghan Bohren from the University of Melbourne Centre for Health Equity and WHO, showed that women were at the highest risk of experience physical and verbal abuse between 30 minutes of birth until 15 minutes after birth. (2019-10-08)

Different views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC)
There is considerable variations in different countriesĀ“ health care systems and professionals in the views on vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC), according to a European study. However, women'sĀ“ views are more similar in the different countries. (2019-10-03)

Even mother's mild depressive symptoms affect the child's emotional well-being
Even mild long-term depressive symptoms among mothers are connected with emotional problems among small children such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety. (2019-09-23)

Early maternal anemia tied to intellectual disability, ADHD and autism
The timing of anemia -- a common condition in late pregnancy -- can make a big difference for the developing fetus, according to research at Karolinska Institutet published in JAMA Psychiatry. The researchers found a link between early anemia and increased risk of autism, ADHD and intellectual disability in children. Anemia discovered toward the end of pregnancy did not have the same correlation. The findings underscore the importance of early screening for iron status and nutritional counselling. (2019-09-18)

Once scarce, neonatal intensive care proliferates
Is NICU care being driven by medical need or competition? A new Dartmouth study finds nearly half of newborns in NICUs are normal birth weight. The Dartmouth Atlas of Neonatal Intensive Care offers the first comprehensive examination of US neonatal care across large populations of newborns. The report raises questions about how medical care is provided to our nation's newborns, particularly to those born premature or with other health problems. (2019-09-04)

Pregnant women of color experience disempowerment by health care providers
A new study finds that women of color perceive their interactions with doctors, nurses and midwives as being misleading, with information being 'packaged' in such a way as to disempower them by limiting maternity healthcare choices for themselves and their children. (2019-08-27)

In medicine, young women continue to pay a higher price for family
Forty percent of female doctors in a new study stopped working or moved to working part time within a few years of finishing their medical training. In contrast, all of the male doctors kept working full time. (2019-08-02)

A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care
A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high. (2019-07-10)

Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. Because the number of primary care physicians has remained stable, access to care has been a concern. (2019-07-10)

How primary care physicians can make Astana work
The Astana Declaration, adopted by the World Health Organization in October 2018, acknowledges the importance of primary health care to achieve better health outcomes globally. But how, the authors ask, can physicians make this declaration work? (2019-07-10)

'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says
Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed. (2019-06-14)

Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring, new research shows
Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School in the UK. (2019-06-13)

Mortality rate 'weekend effect' not a reliable measure of care quality in hospitals
The higher mortality rate for weekend hospital admissions should not be used as an indicator of quality of care due to the lack of data preceding patient admission and on the severity of their illness, a new study conducted at the University of Warwick Medical School has concluded. (2019-06-04)

The Lancet: Health progress threatened by neglect of gender
Today, The Lancet published a new Series on 'Gender Equality, Norms and Health', which finds that governments and health institutions have persistently failed to make progress towards gender equality, despite the impact of gender -- and the spoken and unspoken rules of societies about acceptable gender behaviors -- on health throughout life. Set to be launched at the annual 'Women Deliver 2019' [1] conference, this Lancet Series is the result of a four-year project developed by over 100 contributors from five continents. (2019-05-30)

Study questions European Parliament's perception as champion of gender equality
The European Parliament is often viewed as the most democratic and gender equal decision-making institution of the European Union. A new Journal of Common Market Studies article critically scrutinizes this assumption through an analysis of female members' perceptions. (2019-05-22)

New tool measures primary care as a whole
There are a number of measures to assess aspects of primary care, but a new measure breaks new ground by combining experiences of patients, clinicians, and payers and allowing the most informed reporter -- the patient -- to assess vital primary care functions that are often missed. (2019-05-14)

Hospital study shows in just a decade, proportion of pregnant women with obesity has doubled
The proportion of pregnant women with obesity (body mass index [BMI] above 30 kg/m2) has doubled over the past decade, from around 22% in 2010 to 44% in 2018, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, UK (April 28-May 1). (2019-04-30)

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