Current Mathematical Equations News and Events

Current Mathematical Equations News and Events, Mathematical Equations News Articles.
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A dynamic forest floor
Walk along the beach after a winter storm and you'll see a shore littered with wracks of giant kelp, some 30 to 40 feet long -- evidence of the storm's impact on coastal kelp forests. (2021-02-22)

In response to Stephen Colbert, FAU professor says 'spice it up'
A research professor gives a ''shout out'' to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil's sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers - the worst being the quadratic equation - an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject. (2021-02-17)

RUDN University physicists analyzed the role of gravity in elementary particles formation
Gravity might play a bigger role in the formation of elementary particles than scientists used to believe. A team of physicists from RUDN University obtained some solutions of semi-classical models that describe particle-like waves. They also calculated the ratio between the gravitational interaction of particles and the interaction of their charges. (2021-02-17)

New physics rules tested on quantum computer
Simulation of non-Hermitian quantum mechanics using a quantum computer goes beyond centuries old conventions (2021-02-15)

Moffitt uses mathematical modeling to identify factors that determine adaptive therapy success
In a new article featured on this month's cover of Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Oxford University, report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy. (2021-02-15)

UrFU Mathematician's new methods for solving optimal control problem of objects
Yurii Averboukh, associate professor, Department of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Federal University, senior researcher, Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, published his article ''A stability property in mean field type differential games'' in the Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications (2021-02-12)

RUDN University mathematician suggested a scheme for solving telegraph equations
A mathematician from RUDN University suggested a stable difference scheme for solving inverse problems for elliptic-telegraph and differential equations that are used to describe biological, physical, and sociological processes. (2021-02-11)

Placing cosmological constraints on quantum gravity phenomenology
Through new research published in EPJ C, researchers have used well-established cosmological observations to place tighter constraints on the quadratic model of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, while discrediting the linear model. (2021-02-10)

The quantum advantage: a novel demonstration
Scientists have just proved that a quantum machine can perform a given verification task in seconds when the same exercise would take a time equivalent to the age of the universe for a conventional computer. For this demonstration, they combined a complex interactive algorithm that solves a certain type of mathematical problem with limited information and a simple experimental photonics system that can be made in all advanced photonics laboratories. (2021-02-08)

Mathematics developed new classes of stellar dynamics systems solutions
The Vlasov-Poisson equations describe many important physical phenomena such as the distribution of gravitating particles in the interstellar space, high-temperature plasma kinetics, and the Landau damping effect. A joint team of scientists from the Mathematical Institute of RUDN University and the Mathematical Institute of the University of Munich suggested a new method to obtain stationary solutions for a system of Vlasov-Poisson equations in a three-dimensional case. (2021-02-05)

The Ramanujan Machine
The study, which was published in the journal Nature, was carried out by undergraduates from different faculties under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Ido Kaminer of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. (2021-02-05)

Researchers find a way to increase spatial resolution in brain activity visualization
Researchers from the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have proposed a new method to process magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, which helps find cortical activation areas with higher precision. The method can be used in both basic research and clinical practice to diagnose a wide range of neurological disorders and to prepare patients for brain surgery. The paper describing the algorithm was published in the journal NeuroImage. (2021-02-05)

New research studies 'domino effects' and synchrony in brain activity
Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in the quest to understand the intricate processes that occur in the brain during seizures that are the key symptom of epilepsy. (2021-02-05)

Mathematical method developed to predict cancer and drug-specific immunotherapy efficacy
Houston Methodist researchers have developed a mathematical model to predict how specific cancers will respond to immunotherapy treatments, thus enhancing chances for successful treatments from a wide variety of cancer-immunotherapy drug combinations. The results were recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering in collaboration with researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center. (2021-02-01)

Tsunamis and tsunami warning: recent progress and future prospects
There have been frequent tsunamis since the 21st century, drawing the attention of many countries on the study of tsunami mechanism and warning. Tsunami records also play an essential role in deriving earthquake rupture models in subduction zones. A recent paper reviews the recent progress and limitations of tsunami research, from the aspects of tsunami generation, propagation, inversion and warning. Potential tsunami warning strategies are discussed and future prospects on tsunami research are provided. (2021-02-01)

"Liquid" machine-learning system adapts to changing conditions
MIT researchers developed a neural network that learns on the job, not just during training. The ''liquid'' network varies its equations' parameters, enhancing its ability to analyze time series data. The advance could boost autonomous driving, medical diagnosis, and more. (2021-01-28)

Scientists improved eye tracking technology in VR systems
The tracking of eye movement is one of the key elements of virtual and amplified reality technologies (VR/AR). A team from MSU together with a professor from RUDN University developed a mathematical model that helps accurately predict the next gaze fixation point and reduces the inaccuracy caused by blinking. The model would make VR/AR systems more realistic and sensitive to user actions. (2021-01-22)

Getting shapes into numbers
A mathematical framework enables accurate characterization of shapes (2021-01-20)

COVID-19 model reveals key role for innate immunity in controlling viral load
Since SARS-CoV-2 was identified in December 2019, researchers have worked feverishly to study the novel coronavirus. Although much knowledge has been gained, scientists still have a lot to learn about how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the human body, and how the immune system fights it. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have developed a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that reveals a key role for the innate immune system in controlling viral load. (2021-01-20)

Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds. (2021-01-19)

New management approach can help avoid species vulnerability or extinction
Research focuses on transient nature of species' and ecosystem stability; illustrates how prepare for possible flips. (2021-01-18)

How cells move and don't get stuck
Theoretical physicists from Berlin teamed up with experimental physicists from Munich to determine the precise mechanics involved in cell motility. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2021-01-18)

Tracking the evolution Maxwell knots
A new study published in EPJ C by Alexei Morozov and Nikita Tselousov, from the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics and the Institute of Transmission Problems, Moscow, respectively, details peculiar solutions to the Maxwell equations--so-called Maxwell knots. The research could have applications in the fields of mathematical physics and string theory. (2021-01-18)

A mathematical study describes how metastasis starts
A scientific study carried out by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) has produced a mathematical description of the way in which a tumor invades the epithelial cells and automatically quantifies the progression of the tumor and the remaining cell islands after its progression. The model developed by these researchers could be used to better understand the biophysical characteristics of the cells involved when developing new treatments for wound healing, organ regeneration, or cancer progression. (2021-01-18)

Spreading the sound
Tsukuba University scientists describe the diffusion of sound in disordered materials, such as glass, using a new mathematical model. This work may lead to stronger and cheaper displays for touchscreen devices. (2021-01-15)

Model used to evaluate lockdowns was flawed
In a recent study, researchers from Imperial College London developed a model to assess the effect of different measures used to curb the spread of the coronavirus. However, the model had fundamental shortcomings and cannot be used to draw the published conclusions, claim Swedish researchers from Lund University, and other institutions, in the journal Nature. (2020-12-26)

Modeling can help balance economy, health during pandemic
Using mathematical modeling, new interdisciplinary research from the lab of Arye Nehorai, the Eugene & Martha Lohman Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Preston M. Green Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, determines the best course of action when it comes to walking the line between economic stability and the best possible health outcomes. (2020-12-24)

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials
Theoretical physicists Yoshimichi Teratani and Akira Oguri of Osaka City University, and Rui Sakano of the University of Tokyo have developed mathematical formulas that describe a physical phenomenon happening within quantum dots and other nanosized materials. The formulas, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, could be applied to further theoretical research about the physics of quantum dots, ultra-cold atomic gasses, and quarks. (2020-12-23)

Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population. (2020-12-21)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing. Last year, scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the Instituto Argentino de RadioastronomĀ­ia (IAR) began a pulsar timing study using two upgraded radio telescopes in Argentina. They are releasing observations from the first year in a new study. (2020-12-21)

Artificial Intelligence that can run a simulation faithful to physical laws
Researchers led by Associate Professor YAGUCHI Takaharu (Kobe University) and Associate Professor MATSUBARA Takashi (Osaka University) have successfully developed technology to simulate phenomena for which the detailed mechanism or formula are unexplained. They did this by using AI to create a model, which is faithful to the laws of physics, from observational data. This technology will hopefully enable these kinds of phenomena (e.g. wave motion and fracture mechanics) to be more accurately predicted by computer simulations. (2020-12-18)

AI model shows promise to generate faster, more accurate weather forecasts
A model based solely on the past 40 years of weather events uses 7,000 times less computer power than today's weather forecasting tools. An A.I.-powered model could someday provide more accurate forecasts for rain, snow and other weather events. (2020-12-15)

What happens when rain falls on desert soils? An updated model provides answers
In a new study in Vadose Zone Journal, Desert Research Institute scientists Yuan Luo, Ph.D., Markus Berli, Ph.D., and colleagues Teamrat Ghezzehei, Ph.D. of the University of California, Merced, and Zhongbo Yu, Ph.D. of the University of Hohai, China, make important improvements to our understanding of how water moves through and gets stored in dry desert soils by refining an existing computer model. (2020-12-14)

Explained: Political polarization
Polarization - which divides the population into belligerent groups with rigidly opposed beliefs and identities - has a steely grip on the United States, and a University of Houston researcher reports that economic inequality is to blame. (2020-12-14)

Artificial intelligence helps scientists develop new general models in ecology
The automation of scientific discoveries is here to stay. Among others, a machine-human cooperation found a hitherto unknown general model explaining the relation between the area and age of an island and the number of species it hosts. (2020-12-11)

Mystery solved with math: cytoplasmic traffic jam disrupts sleep-wake cycles?
KAIST mathematicians and their collaborators at Florida State University have identified the principle of how aging and diseases like dementia and obesity cause sleep disorders. A combination of mathematical modelling and experiments demonstrated that the cytoplasmic congestion caused by aging, dementia, and/or obesity disrupts the circadian rhythms in the human body and leads to irregular sleep-wake cycles. This finding suggests new treatment strategies for addressing unstable sleep-wake cycles. (2020-12-11)

Science of sandcastles is clarified, finally
Capillary condensation is a textbook phenomenon and omnipresent in our world. For example, children playing on the beach rely on this universal process to hold their sandcastles together. Despite its importance scientists have had to rely on an equation first set by the great Victorian physicist Lord Kelvin 150 years ago - but for the first time a Manchester team led by Nobel laureate Andre Geim can explain how the microscopic process actually works. (2020-12-09)

Noninvasive way to explore traumatic brain injuries
A noninvasive method to measure the stiffness parameters along fibrous pathways within the brain is helping researchers explore traumatic brain injuries. The stiffness of these tissues can reveal clues about changes and pathologies within the brain's gray and white matter. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Anthony J. Romano will describe the method known as waveguide elastography. Waveguide elastography merges magnetic resonance elastography and diffusion tensor imaging with a combination of isotropic and anisotropic inversion algorithms. (2020-12-09)

Research develops new theoretical approach to manipulate light
The quest to discover pioneering new ways in which to manipulate how light travels through electromagnetic materials has taken a new, unusual twist. (2020-12-08)

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