Current Mathematical News and Events

Current Mathematical News and Events, Mathematical News Articles.
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A dynamic forest floor
Walk along the beach after a winter storm and you'll see a shore littered with wracks of giant kelp, some 30 to 40 feet long -- evidence of the storm's impact on coastal kelp forests. (2021-02-22)

New physics rules tested on quantum computer
Simulation of non-Hermitian quantum mechanics using a quantum computer goes beyond centuries old conventions (2021-02-15)

Moffitt uses mathematical modeling to identify factors that determine adaptive therapy success
In a new article featured on this month's cover of Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Oxford University, report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy. (2021-02-15)

The quantum advantage: a novel demonstration
Scientists have just proved that a quantum machine can perform a given verification task in seconds when the same exercise would take a time equivalent to the age of the universe for a conventional computer. For this demonstration, they combined a complex interactive algorithm that solves a certain type of mathematical problem with limited information and a simple experimental photonics system that can be made in all advanced photonics laboratories. (2021-02-08)

Mathematics developed new classes of stellar dynamics systems solutions
The Vlasov-Poisson equations describe many important physical phenomena such as the distribution of gravitating particles in the interstellar space, high-temperature plasma kinetics, and the Landau damping effect. A joint team of scientists from the Mathematical Institute of RUDN University and the Mathematical Institute of the University of Munich suggested a new method to obtain stationary solutions for a system of Vlasov-Poisson equations in a three-dimensional case. (2021-02-05)

The Ramanujan Machine
The study, which was published in the journal Nature, was carried out by undergraduates from different faculties under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Ido Kaminer of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. (2021-02-05)

Researchers find a way to increase spatial resolution in brain activity visualization
Researchers from the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have proposed a new method to process magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, which helps find cortical activation areas with higher precision. The method can be used in both basic research and clinical practice to diagnose a wide range of neurological disorders and to prepare patients for brain surgery. The paper describing the algorithm was published in the journal NeuroImage. (2021-02-05)

New research studies 'domino effects' and synchrony in brain activity
Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in the quest to understand the intricate processes that occur in the brain during seizures that are the key symptom of epilepsy. (2021-02-05)

Mathematical method developed to predict cancer and drug-specific immunotherapy efficacy
Houston Methodist researchers have developed a mathematical model to predict how specific cancers will respond to immunotherapy treatments, thus enhancing chances for successful treatments from a wide variety of cancer-immunotherapy drug combinations. The results were recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering in collaboration with researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center. (2021-02-01)

Scientists improved eye tracking technology in VR systems
The tracking of eye movement is one of the key elements of virtual and amplified reality technologies (VR/AR). A team from MSU together with a professor from RUDN University developed a mathematical model that helps accurately predict the next gaze fixation point and reduces the inaccuracy caused by blinking. The model would make VR/AR systems more realistic and sensitive to user actions. (2021-01-22)

Getting shapes into numbers
A mathematical framework enables accurate characterization of shapes (2021-01-20)

COVID-19 model reveals key role for innate immunity in controlling viral load
Since SARS-CoV-2 was identified in December 2019, researchers have worked feverishly to study the novel coronavirus. Although much knowledge has been gained, scientists still have a lot to learn about how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the human body, and how the immune system fights it. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have developed a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that reveals a key role for the innate immune system in controlling viral load. (2021-01-20)

Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds. (2021-01-19)

New management approach can help avoid species vulnerability or extinction
Research focuses on transient nature of species' and ecosystem stability; illustrates how prepare for possible flips. (2021-01-18)

How cells move and don't get stuck
Theoretical physicists from Berlin teamed up with experimental physicists from Munich to determine the precise mechanics involved in cell motility. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2021-01-18)

Tracking the evolution Maxwell knots
A new study published in EPJ C by Alexei Morozov and Nikita Tselousov, from the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics and the Institute of Transmission Problems, Moscow, respectively, details peculiar solutions to the Maxwell equations--so-called Maxwell knots. The research could have applications in the fields of mathematical physics and string theory. (2021-01-18)

A mathematical study describes how metastasis starts
A scientific study carried out by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) has produced a mathematical description of the way in which a tumor invades the epithelial cells and automatically quantifies the progression of the tumor and the remaining cell islands after its progression. The model developed by these researchers could be used to better understand the biophysical characteristics of the cells involved when developing new treatments for wound healing, organ regeneration, or cancer progression. (2021-01-18)

Model used to evaluate lockdowns was flawed
In a recent study, researchers from Imperial College London developed a model to assess the effect of different measures used to curb the spread of the coronavirus. However, the model had fundamental shortcomings and cannot be used to draw the published conclusions, claim Swedish researchers from Lund University, and other institutions, in the journal Nature. (2020-12-26)

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials
Theoretical physicists Yoshimichi Teratani and Akira Oguri of Osaka City University, and Rui Sakano of the University of Tokyo have developed mathematical formulas that describe a physical phenomenon happening within quantum dots and other nanosized materials. The formulas, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, could be applied to further theoretical research about the physics of quantum dots, ultra-cold atomic gasses, and quarks. (2020-12-23)

Traditional model for disease spread may not work in COVID-19
A mathematical model that can help project the contagiousness and spread of infectious diseases like the seasonal flu may not be the best way to predict the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus, especially during lockdowns that alter the normal mix of the population. (2020-12-21)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

Scientists complete yearlong pulsar timing study after reviving dormant radio telescopes
While the scientific community grapples with the loss of the Arecibo radio telescope, astronomers who revived a long-dormant radio telescope array in Argentina hope it can help compensate for the work Arecibo did in pulsar timing. Last year, scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronom­ia (IAR) began a pulsar timing study using two upgraded radio telescopes in Argentina. They are releasing observations from the first year in a new study. (2020-12-21)

Explained: Political polarization
Polarization - which divides the population into belligerent groups with rigidly opposed beliefs and identities - has a steely grip on the United States, and a University of Houston researcher reports that economic inequality is to blame. (2020-12-14)

Mystery solved with math: cytoplasmic traffic jam disrupts sleep-wake cycles?
KAIST mathematicians and their collaborators at Florida State University have identified the principle of how aging and diseases like dementia and obesity cause sleep disorders. A combination of mathematical modelling and experiments demonstrated that the cytoplasmic congestion caused by aging, dementia, and/or obesity disrupts the circadian rhythms in the human body and leads to irregular sleep-wake cycles. This finding suggests new treatment strategies for addressing unstable sleep-wake cycles. (2020-12-11)

Characterising complex flows in 2D bubble swarms
Research published in EPJ E shows that in 2D simulated fluids, upward-flowing swarms of bubbles, a mathematical relationship describing the nature of flows in their wake, previously thought to be universal, actually changes within larger-scale flows in less viscous fluids. (2020-12-04)

Curtin collision models impact the future of energy
A new Curtin University-created database of electron-molecule reactions is a major step forward in making nuclear fusion power a reality, by allowing researchers to accurately model plasmas containing molecular hydrogen. (2020-12-01)

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier. Among other things, the new development can be applied to cooperative game theory. (2020-12-01)

RUDN University research team of mathematicians suggested a new decision making algorithm
A research team from RUDN University developed an algorithm to help large groups of people make optimal decisions in a short time. They confirmed the efficiency of their model using the example of the market at which the outbreak of COVID-19 began. The model helped the administration and sellers agree on closing the market and reach a consensus about the sums of compensations in just three steps. (2020-11-25)

Quantum magic squares
The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicist Gemma De las Cuevas and mathematicians Tim Netzer and Tom Drescher introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares. (2020-11-24)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Enriching research in ecology and evolution through nine 'flavors' of history
In a recent article in The Quarterly Review of Biology, ''Beyond Equilibria: The Neglected Role of History in Ecology and Evolution,'' author Hamish G. Spencer argues for a revitalized view of history. This historical view is a response to current research in the field of ecology and evolution, which is dominated by an ahistorical view of dynamic systems. (2020-11-23)

Biophysics - geometry supersedes simulations
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have introduced a new method that allows biological pattern-forming systems to be systematically characterized with the aid of mathematical analysis. The trick lies in the use of geometry to characterize the dynamics. (2020-11-20)

Possible 1,000-kilometer-long river running deep below Greenland's ice sheet
Computational models suggest that melting water originating in the deep interior of Greenland could flow the entire length of a subglacial valley and exit at Petermann Fjord, along the northern coast of the island. Updating ice sheet models with this open valley could provide additional insight for future climate change predictions. (2020-11-12)

Intelligent surfaces signal better coverage
A mathematical model shows specialized reflective panels could be deployed on a large scale to enhance communication networks in urban areas. (2020-11-11)

Modelling microswimmers for drug delivery
An international group of theoretical physicists led by Abdallah Daddi-Moussa-Ider from Düsseldorf, Germany, has modelled the motion of microscopic, motile bodies - either powered micro-machines or living cells - in viscous liquid drops, using the Navier-Stokes equations. This work, which has applications in materials science and medicine, is now published in EPJ E. (2020-11-11)

Sticky electrons: When repulsion turns into attraction
Scientists in Vienna explain what happens at a strange 'border line' in materials science: Under certain conditions, materials change from well-known behaviour to different, partly unexplained phenomena. This can be explained by the emergence of attractive forces, counteracting the repulsion between electrons. (2020-11-10)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

RUDN University physicist developed software solution to measure the black holes stability
Even if a black hole can be described with a mathematical model, it doesn't mean it exists in reality. Some theoretical models are unstable: though they can be used to run mathematical calculations, from the point of view of physics they make no sense. A physicist from RUDN University developed an approach to finding such instability regions. (2020-11-05)

A new mathematical front to understand species coexistence
In an effort to understand how different species coexist, researchers develop a mathematical model that establishes interactions in co-colonization as the key. The study, published in the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, links epidemiology, ecology and evolution and models host colonization by different microbial species, providing fundamental advances for the analysis of species coexistence and the understanding of biodiversity. (2020-11-03)

Mathematical modeling of processes in neurons to assist the treatment of epilepsy and depression
Researchers study the effect of neural stimulation by ultrasonic waves and analyzing the influence of ultrasonic wave parameters on the excitation of electrical signals in the nerves. The obtained results have a great practical value for further studies related to the issues of human brain modeling. (2020-11-02)

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