Current Mathematicians News and Events

Current Mathematicians News and Events, Mathematicians News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 14 | 554 Results
The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

In response to Stephen Colbert, FAU professor says 'spice it up'
A research professor gives a ''shout out'' to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil's sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers - the worst being the quadratic equation - an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject. (2021-02-17)

The Ramanujan Machine
The study, which was published in the journal Nature, was carried out by undergraduates from different faculties under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Ido Kaminer of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. (2021-02-05)

RUDN University mathematicians reduced neural network size six times without post-training
A team of mathematicians from RUDN University found a way to reduce the size of a trained neural network six times without spending additional resources on re-training it. The approach is based on finding a correlation between the weights of neural connections in the initial system and its simplified version. (2021-02-05)

RUDN University mathematicians developed new approach to 5g base stations operation
Mathematicians from RUDN University suggested and tested a new method to assess the productivity of fifth-generation (5G) base stations. The new technology would help get rid of mobile access stations and even out traffic fluctuations. (2021-02-03)

Using ancient fossils and gravitational-wave science to predict earth's future
New research on predicting the earth's future climate: Using gravitational-wave science, a group of international scientists, including Australian OzGrav astrophysicist Ilya Mandel, studied ancient marine fossils as a predictor of climate change. (2021-01-19)

Students returning home may have caused 9,400 secondary COVID-19 infections across UK
A student infected with COVID-19 returning home from university for Christmas would, on average, have infected just less than one other household member with the virus, according to a new model devised by mathematicians at Cardiff University and published in Health Systems. (2021-01-17)

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier. Among other things, the new development can be applied to cooperative game theory. (2020-12-01)

RUDN University research team of mathematicians suggested a new decision making algorithm
A research team from RUDN University developed an algorithm to help large groups of people make optimal decisions in a short time. They confirmed the efficiency of their model using the example of the market at which the outbreak of COVID-19 began. The model helped the administration and sellers agree on closing the market and reach a consensus about the sums of compensations in just three steps. (2020-11-25)

RUDN University mathematicians applied 19th century ideas to modern computerized algebra systems
A team of mathematicians from RUDN University added new symbolic integration functionality to the Sage computerized algebra system. The team implemented ideas and methods suggested by the German mathematician Karl Weierstrass in the 1870s. (2020-11-25)

Rice has many fathers but only two mothers
University of Queensland scientists studied more than 3000 rice genotypes and found diversity was inherited through two maternal genomes identified in all rice varieties. (2020-11-10)

When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Using data from all 50 US states plus the District of Columbia, two mathematicians have developed a new method to analyse COVD-19 rates to help policymakers identify demonstrable turning points in infection surges. (2020-09-22)

Cyclohexyl phenyl sulfide cleavage studied for degradation of sulfur-containing heavy oil
So far, the KFU team has proven copper compounds are the most effective in producing catalysts for heavy oil extraction. (2020-08-20)

USU mathematicians unravel a thread of string theory
Thomas Hill and Andreas Malmendier of Utah State University, and Adrian Clingher of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, explore a string duality between F-theory and heterotic string theory in eight dimensions in paper published in 'Letters in Mathematical Physics.' (2020-08-17)

How the zebrafish got its stripes
Animal patterns are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have worked out how zebrafish develop their stripes. (2020-07-27)

Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
In a new paper, Cornell Tech researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken -- as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness. (2020-07-27)

Unleashing the potential of tethered drones
Wire-connected drones may complement or replace the fixed base stations of cellular communications networks. (2020-07-15)

Behind the dead-water phenomenon
What makes ships mysteriously slow down or even stop as they travel, even though their engines are working properly? This was first observed in 1893 and was described experimentally in 1904 without all the secrets of this ''dead water'' being understood. A French team has explained this phenomenon for the first time. (2020-07-06)

An ethical eye on AI
Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and business manage and police Artificial Intelligence systems' biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging commercial choices - an ethical eye on AI. (2020-06-29)

Herd immunity threshold could be lower according to new study
Herd immunity to Covid-19 could be achieved with less people being infected than previously estimated according to new research. (2020-06-23)

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (2020-06-18)

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (2020-06-16)

Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures
Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. (2020-06-02)

RIT scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed a method they believe will help epidemiologists more efficiently predict the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their new study, published in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, outlines a solution to the SIR epidemic model, which is commonly used to predict how many people are susceptible to, infected by, and recovered from viral epidemics. (2020-05-29)

NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely resemble spheres. (2020-05-28)

Models explain changes in cooking meat
In new research published in EPJ Plus, a team of mathematicians show that by modelling meat as a fluid-saturated matrix of elastic proteins, which are deformed as the fluid moves, cooking behaviours can be simulated more precisely. (2020-04-01)

Virtual cell predicts how close tumor environment influences cancer metastasis
IGC Researchers identify signals emitted by the tumor environment, which controls the migrating capacity of cancer cells. The new discovery, now published on CANCER RESEARCH, increases understanding of the complexity of molecules involved in cancer, and opens the possibility of manipulating these signals in the tumor environment to reduce cancer aggressiveness. (2020-03-31)

Fish school by randomly copying each other, rather than following the group
An international team of researchers has revealed the mechanisms behind fish schooling -- and what they found differs from what scientists had previously thought. (2020-03-02)

More clues for how the monkeyflower got its spots
The monkeyflower, or Mimulus, though possessing a relatively simple genome is able to produce a stunning array of pigmentation patterns. A team of researchers is one step closer to understanding exactly how this genus of wildflowers is able to achieve such remarkable diversity, their work will be published Thursday in Current Biology. (2020-02-20)

Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Mathematicians, physicists and materials experts might not spring to mind as the first people to consult about whether you are brewing your coffee right. But a team of such researchers including Dr. Jamie Foster, a mathematician at the University of Portsmouth, are challenging common espresso wisdom. (2020-01-22)

Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test
Mathematicians from the University of York have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses. (2020-01-09)

Escher's angels and demons woodcut predicts how matter deforms
Dutch artist M.C. Escher's most famous drawing, 'Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell)', shows angels and demons in a tessellation that fills a circle without empty spaces. This masterful woodcut inspired an international partnership of researchers including Politecnico di Milano Physics Department to author the cover-story article published in Physical Review Letters (*). (2019-11-21)

RUDN scientists proved a theorem that would help calculate water movement in porous rock
Mathematicians from RUDN University have proved the unique continuation theorem for a one dimensional solution to a fractional order diffusion problem. The results of RUDN University mathematicians' work are needed for a more accurate analysis of solutions and their numerical simulation. In the general case, there are no such continuation theorems for other classes of similar equations. (2019-10-23)

RUDN University mathematicians help improve efficiency of data centers using Markov chains
RUDN University mathematicians created a model of maximum efficiency of data centers. It is based on a nontrivial Markov chain. In addition to the obvious practical applications of the results for the organization of servers and data centers, the theoretical part will be useful for the theory of queues and queuing, as well as for working with big data and neural networks. The study is published in the journal Mathematics. (2019-09-30)

RUDN University mathematician first described the movement in a flat strip of plasma
RUDN University mathematician for the first time proved the theorem of existence and uniqueness of solutions of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a strip. Such theorems are very rare for partial differential equations. The new results can be applied, for instance, in astrophysics, in describing the propagation of plane waves in plasma. The article is published in the journal Nonlinear Analysis: Real World Applications. (2019-09-19)

Immune response depends on mathematics of narrow escapes
The way immune cells pick friends from foes can be described by a classic maths puzzle known as the 'narrow escape problem'. (2019-09-16)

New scientific model can predict moral and political development
A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critical questions on how public opinion changes on moral issues. They have created a scientific model that can predict public opinion changes on moral issues. (2019-08-26)

Mathematicians of TU Dresden develop new statistical indicator
Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. Dr. Björn Böttcher, Professor Martin Keller-Ressel and Professor René Schilling from TU Dresden's Institute of Mathematical Stochastics have developed a dependence measure called 'distance multivariance.' (2019-08-09)

Expert mathematicians stumped by simple subtractions
Mathematics is seen as the pinnacle of abstract thinking. But are we capable of filtering out our knowledge about the world to prevent it from interfering with our calculations? Researchers (UNIGE) have demonstrated that our ability to solve mathematical problems is influenced by non-mathematical knowledge, which results in mistakes. The findings indicate that high-level mathematicians can be duped by some aspects of their knowledge about the world and fail to solve primary school-level subtraction problems. (2019-07-10)

Mathematical modeling for translational research of new CRSD medication
Mathematicians' new modeling has identified major sources of interspecies and inter-individual variations in the clinical efficacy of a clock-modulating drug: photosensitivity and PER2 level. This enabled precision medicine for circadian disruption. (2019-07-09)

Page 1 of 14 | 554 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.