Current Mayo Clinic News and Events | Page 3

Current Mayo Clinic News and Events, Mayo Clinic News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
Cleveland Clinic study finds no link between influenza vaccine and COVID-19 risk
Using patient data from Cleveland Clinic's COVID-19 registry, Dr. Joe Zein found that receiving the flu vaccine does not increase risk for COVID-19 or worsen associated disease outcomes, suggesting it is safe and advisable to receive the influenza vaccine this flu season. (2020-09-21)

How to improve the surgery backlog during COVID-19
When the COVID-19 pandemic first began, many non-urgent surgeries were delayed. Now, a new paper explains how to address the backlog of surgeries, without compromising patient outcomes. (2020-09-21)

Authoritative new analysis links increased omega-3 intake to cardioprotection and improved cardiovascular outcomes
A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides the most comprehensive analysis of the role of omega-3 dosage on cardiovascular prevention to date. The meta-analysis, which is an in-depth review of 40 clinical trials, provides authoritative evidence for consuming more EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) omega-3 fats. (2020-09-17)

Examining association of coffee consumption, survival in patients with colorectal cancer
Researchers in this observational study investigated the association between the number of cups of coffee consumed per day and survival in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. (2020-09-17)

Coffee associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients
In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study. (2020-09-17)

OHSU-VA research suggests strategies to reduce missed appointments
New research from Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System suggests that a little finesse and a thoughtful approach could go a long way toward reducing a vexing problem in the health care system: missed appointments. (2020-09-17)

Many women suffering from severe migraine might avoid pregnancy, but should they?
A survey of 607 women who suffer from severe migraine found twenty percent of the respondents are currently avoiding pregnancy because of their migraines. The women avoiding pregnancy due to severe migraine tend to be in their thirties, are more likely to have migraine triggered by menstruation, and are more likely to have very frequent attacks (chronic migraine) compared to their counterparts who are not avoiding pregnancy, according to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-09-15)

Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model. However, rural clinics often lack the workforce capacity to provide collaborative behavioral health services. In a new qualitative study, rural Washington primary care clinics adopted telehealth methods to connect remotely with specialists. The study found that telepsychiatric collaboration prepared primary care physicians and rural clinic staff to deliver high quality mental health care in underserved areas. (2020-09-15)

Mayo scientists develop mathematical index to distinguish healthy microbiome from diseased
What causes some people to develop chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and metabolic syndrome while others stay healthy? A major clue could be found in their gut microbiome -- the trillions of microbes living inside the digestive system that regulate various bodily functions. (2020-09-15)

An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care. In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulting psychiatrist. (2020-09-15)

Mayo Clinic and TGen ID potential targets for the most-deadly form of pancreatic cancer
In what is believed to be the most comprehensive analysis of adenosquamous cancer of the pancreas (ASCP), the Mayo Clinic and TGen team identified, in preclinical models, therapeutic targets for this extremely fast-moving and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, and identified already available cancer inhibitors originally designed for other types of cancer, according to a study published today in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-09-14)

Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic. Results were published in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-09-08)

Severe Covid-19 despite or even due to the strong immunity
A weak immune response isn't the cause of dangerous lung failure in severe Covid-19 infections. Such infections seem, on the contrary, to be caused by an overreaction of the immune system. This is the conclusion made by a research team from Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) and the university hospital of Duisburg-Essen led by Professor Nina Babel, Head of the Centre for Translational Medicine at the RUB clinic Marien Hospital Herne. (2020-09-01)

Lung injuries from vaping have characteristic patterns on CT
Injuries to the lungs from vaping have suggestive patterns on CT scans that could help physicians make accurate diagnoses and reduce unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study. (2020-08-27)

Medical errors increase following the spring change to daylight saving time
Seeking medical care after springing forward to daylight saving time could be a risky proposition. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found a statistically significant increase in adverse medical events that might be related to human error in the week after the annual time change in the spring. (2020-08-27)

Cardiology trial shows potential benefit of genetic testing when selecting blood thinners
An international, first-of-its-kind cardiology trial used personalized genetic testing to reduce by 34 per cent the number of serious adverse events following balloon angioplasty, a treatment for the most common form of heart disease. (2020-08-25)

Clinical trial shows potential benefit to anti-platelet therapy
Heart patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or stent placement? nonsurgical procedures to improve blood flow to the heart are typically prescribed anti-platelet therapy to avoid blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. New research from the international TAILOR-PCI trial, the largest pharmacogenetics clinical trial in cardiology, suggests that genetic testing could potentially be a useful tool to help select antiplatelet medication. (2020-08-25)

Online searches for 'chest pain' rise, emergency visits for heart attack drop amid COVID
A study of search engine queries addressed the question of whether online searches for chest pain symptoms correlated to reports of fewer people going to the emergency department with acute heart problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-08-24)

High blood pressure during pregnancy may mean worse hot flashes during menopause
Women with a history of high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy are more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 19, in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. (2020-08-19)

Tumour gene test could help to predict ovarian cancer prognosis
A global team of medical researchers led by UNSW have developed a test that could help to predict survival for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and pave the way towards personalised treatment. (2020-08-17)

Immune response to Sars-Cov-2 following organ transplantation
Even patients with suppressed immune systems can achieve a strong immune response to Sars-Cov-2. A test helps to adapt therapy following an infection. (2020-08-17)

Assessing training in health disparities
This survey study described and compared the curriculum on health disparities from the perspective of program directors and perceptions of training among internal medicine residents. (2020-08-10)

Artificial intelligence-enhanced ECGs may speed heart failure diagnosis and treatment
Electrocardiogram results evaluated with an artificial intelligence-enhanced formula may be able to detect decreased heart function more accurately and quickly than standard blood tests in patients being evaluated in the emergency room for shortness of breath. Diagnosing the cause of shortness of breath quickly is especially important and challenging during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, when more people than ever are seeking emergency care because of difficulty breathing. (2020-08-04)

Emergency Department visits plunged as COVID-19 cases climbed, Yale study finds
A new study from researchers at Yale and the Mayo Clinic found that emergency department (ED) visits dropped significantly in March as the public responded to messages about staying home as a result of the pandemic. (2020-08-03)

The effects of COVID-19 on emergency visits, hospitalizations
As COVID-19 swept into the U.S., hospitals across the country have reported that their emergency departments are emptying out. In a new study published Monday, Aug. 3, in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers from multiple institutions provides insights into this phenomenon. (2020-08-03)

Greater financial integration generally not associated with better healthcare quality
New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, show that larger, more integrated healthcare systems do not generally deliver better quality care, and that there is significant variation in quality scores across hospitals and physician practices, regardless of whether they are independent or owned by larger systems. Policy makers should ensure that mergers or acquisitions due to pandemic-associated financial stress adhere to current antitrust law. (2020-08-03)

Study suggests new approach to improve radiation therapy resistance in glioblastoma
Laboratory research paves the way for a clinical trial to see if an FDA-approved drug used to prevent organ transplant rejection can work against glioblastoma, an aggressive type of brain tumor. (2020-07-30)

Stem cell 'therapy' injuries more widespread than we knew
Grotesque side effects from unproven 'stem cell' therapies are more common than we realized, reports a team of researchers led by UConn Health in Annals of Neurology on July 29. And despite the dangers, many neurologists feel ill-equipped to warn and educate their patients. (2020-07-29)

Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis. (2020-07-28)

Simple urine test could significantly improve detection of adrenal cancer
Using a simple urine test alongside routine imaging for patients with adrenal masses could speed up adrenal cancer diagnosis, improving patient's prognosis and reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures, a new multi-centre study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found. (2020-07-23)

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes. (2020-07-23)

Multidisciplinary approach more effective for gut disorders: study
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital in Australia have conducted a trial involving 144 patients to compare the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary clinic - involving gastroenterologists, dieticians, psychiatrists and physiotherapists - with usual gastroenterology specialist-only care. (2020-07-15)

Meditation linked to lower cardiovascular risk
Meditation was linked to lower cardiovascular risk in a large database study by Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues. The team looked at data on more than 61,000 survey participants. (2020-07-13)

Age-related features of facial anatomy for increase safety during plastic surgery
Researchers from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine together with colleagues from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, University of Munich and Sechenov University used computed tomography to analyze the individual anatomy of the nasolabial triangle. They identified possible options for the distribution of blood vessels on three-dimensional course. (2020-07-10)

Cleveland clinic researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic
CLEVELAND: Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-09)

Life and death, hope and despair in era of COVID-19
The response of a physician to the fear and despair associated with COVID-19 is described in this article. (2020-07-08)

The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished. This morphology would be useful to identify cells that have chromosomal instability inherent in cancer cells. (2020-07-07)

Coronary calcium scoring: Personalized preventive care for those most at risk
An imaging test called coronary calcium scoring can help doctors to make the right recommendation about the use of statin therapy. The test is a 10-minute CT (computed tomography) scan looking for calcium deposits in the arteries supplying blood to the heart. Calcium deposits indicate the presence of coronary plaque, also known as atherosclerosis. (2020-07-06)

Novel biomarker discovery could lead to early diagnosis for deadly preeclampsia
Preeclampsia is a dangerous condition that worldwide kills over 70,000 women and 500,000 babies each year. The discovery of two new biomarkers has the potential to predict key underlying causes of the disease and could lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of severe preeclampsia, and associated complications, researchers say. (2020-07-03)

New model helps to describe defects and errors in quantum computers
A summer internship in Bilbao, Spain, has led to a paper in the journal Physical Review Letters for Jack Mayo, a Master's student at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He has helped to create a universal model that can predict the number distribution of topological defects in non-equilibrium systems. The results can be applied to quantum computing and to studies into the origin of structure in the early Universe. (2020-06-24)

Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.