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Current Mayo Clinic News and Events, Mayo Clinic News Articles.
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SARS-CoV-2: New insights on antibody testing and RNA testing
Two types of tests are used to track SARS-CoV-2. Reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-PCR) tests for current infection. Antibody tests reveal that an infection has taken place, even long after the fact. Each of 2 papers published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (JCM) addresses one of these testing modalities. (2020-06-22)

Super-strong surgical tape detaches on demand
Engineers have designed a super-strong, detachable adhesive that may someday replace surgical sutures. (2020-06-22)

Mayo finds convalescent plasma safe for diverse patients with COVID-19
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have found investigational convalescent plasma to be safe following transfusion in a diverse group of 20,000 patients. The findings -- from the US Food and Drug Administration's Expanded Access Program for COVID-19 -- are reported in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-06-18)

New test paves the way for tailored treatment of deadliest form of ovarian cancer
University of British Columbia (UBC) researchers have led an international team in developing a new test to better diagnose different types of ovarian cancer, a tool that could one day guide and improve treatment options for women diagnosed with the most common and deadliest form of the disease. (2020-06-17)

Researchers develop model to predict likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19, disease outcomes
Cleveland Clinic researchers have developed the world's first risk prediction model for healthcare providers to forecast an individual patient's likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19 as well as their outcomes from the disease. According a new study published in CHEST, the risk prediction model (called a nomogram) shows the relevance of age, race, gender, socioeconomic status, vaccination history and current medications in COVID-19 risk. (2020-06-15)

Use of unproven COVID-19 therapies by African American patients poses risks
Nearly one out of every 10 African Americans has a genetic variant that puts them inherently at an increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Writing in the journal Heart Rhythm, the official publication of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier, investigators observe that along with socioeconomic and cultural factors, this genetic risk factor may contribute to the racial health disparities that have been documented in victims of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-06-15)

Advanced MRI scans may improve treatment of tremor, Parkinson's disease
Recently developed MRI techniques used to more precisely target a small area in the brain linked to Parkinson's disease and essential tremor may lead to better outcomes without surgery and with less risk of negative effects, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. (2020-06-14)

Atherosclerosis screening plus physical activity assessment give doctors a more accurate picture of mortality risk
'On a scale of 1 - 10, how much do you exercise (0-none, 10-always).' Adding this simple question when assessing elderly patients undergoing coronary artery calcium (CAC) scans can help clinicians better understand and treat patients, report scientists in Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality & Outcomes, published by Elsevier. (2020-06-05)

Exercise levels can help doctors predict risk of heart disease and death among elderly
Clinicians can use this information to improve care with early interventions. (2020-06-05)

Not children, but 'super-happy families' the aim of assisted reproduction
Researcher Judith Lind has studied how staff at fertility clinics view the assessments that childless couples and women undergo in order to access assisted reproduction. It emerges in the interviews that the assessment of the potential parents is based on the child's future welfare and on the responsible use of public resources. (2020-06-04)

Better patient identification could help fight the coronavirus
In a peer-reviewed commentary published in npj Digital Medicine, experts from Regenstrief Institute, Mayo Clinic and The Pew Charitable Trusts write that matching patient records from disparate sources is not only achievable, but fundamental to stem the tide of the current pandemic and allow for fast action for future highly contagious viruses. (2020-06-02)

Carfilzomib does not improve outcomes in newly diagnosed myeloma compared to bortezomib
The combination of carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd) did not improve progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma absent a high-risk disease prognosis, compared with the standard of care -- bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd). The data from a planned interim analysis for the ENDURANCE (E1A11) randomized phase three trial will be presented at the ASCO 2020 plenary. KRd had more severe cardiac, pulmonary, and renal toxicities. Neuropathy was more common among those receiving VRd. (2020-05-28)

Women almost twice as likely to choose primary care as men
Analysis of osteopathic medical school survey data reveals women are 1.75 times more likely to choose primary care than men, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Researchers sought to understand factors that increase the likelihood of specializing in primary care. (2020-05-26)

Heart failure patients with limited health literacy may have higher risk of death
Patients with heart failure who experience low health literacy are at an increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. This finding has significant clinical and public health implications and suggests that assessing and intervening upon an individual's understanding of their own health could improve heart failure outcomes, according to research published in JACC: Heart Failure. (2020-05-25)

Just a little physical activity pays big dividends to high risk breast cancer patients
Results of a comprehensive analysis of exercise and its protective role for high-risk breast cancer patients show that women who exercise not only live longer, but also are more likely to remain cancer-free after their treatment. What's more, the study suggests that even a modest amount of exercise can be beneficial. (2020-05-21)

African-American and white women share genes that increase breast cancer risk
The same genes that greatly increase the risk of breast cancer in US white women, including women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, also greatly increase breast cancer risk among African-American women. (2020-05-19)

Lung cancer screening in primary care
The benefits of routine lung cancer screenings have been hotly debated in the medical community. A new lung cancer screening cohort study conducted at a large integrated health system suggests that lung cancer screening in primary care is feasible. The study demonstrated low adverse event rates, and 70% of diagnosed lung cancer cases were detected at early stages in their development. (2020-05-12)

Olanzapine may help control nausea, vomiting in patients with advanced cancer
Olanzapine, a generic drug used to treat nervous, emotional and mental conditions, also may help patients with advanced cancer successfully manage nausea and vomiting unrelated to chemotherapy. These are the findings of a study published Thursday, May 7, 2020 in JAMA Oncology. (2020-05-07)

Intel from an outpatient COVID-19 clinic
A new report offers insights that can help clinicians distinguish between patients with COVID-19 infections and those with other conditions that may mimic COVID-19 symptoms. (2020-05-06)

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)

Supportive oncodermatology interventions improve patient quality of life
A recent survey from the GW Cancer Center found that enrollment in a supportive oncodermatology program is associated with a significantly improved quality of life score. The results are published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology. (2020-05-05)

Germline genomic profiles of children, young adults with solid tumors to inform managementand treatment
A new Cleveland Clinic study demonstrates the importance of genetics evaluation and genetic testing for children, adolescents and young adults with solid tumor cancers. The study was published today in Nature Communications. (2020-05-05)

Genetic doppelgaengers: Emory research provides insight into two neurological puzzles
Insight into the pathological mechanisms behind two devastating neurodegenerative diseases: the most common inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 36 (SCA36). Expanded repeats lead to peptide gobbledygook in both, but with critical differences. (2020-05-05)

APOE4 triggers early breakdowns in the blood-brain barrier
Although scientists have long known APOE4 is a leading risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, they were unsure how exactly it drives a decline in memory. USC scientists believe they have found an answer. (2020-04-29)

Travel considerations specified for 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy patients
Researchers and patient advocates have addressed the challenges related to traveling after receiving 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy in a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Due to the residual radiation activity of 177Lu-DOTATATE, neuroendocrine tumor patients have experienced travel delays at U.S. ports of entry. Researchers recommend that patients carry a travel card containing treatment information after each therapy cycle and for an additional three months after therapy has concluded. (2020-04-27)

Connecting the dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. New research from Mayo Clinic indicates that in patients with one specific type of heart disease ? obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ? the heart increases production of the ACE2 RNA transcript and the translated ACE2 protein. (2020-04-27)

High density EEG produces dynamic image of brain signal source
Marking a major milestone on the path to meeting the objectives of the NIH BRAIN initiative, research by Carnegie Mellon's Biomedical Engineering Department Head Bin He advances high-density electroencephalography (EEG) as the future paradigm for dynamic functional neuroimaging. (2020-04-23)

Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition. (2020-04-21)

Review assesses stem cell therapy potential for treating preeclampsia
A review of using stem cells to treat preeclampsia, a dangerous condition in pregnancy, indicates that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), or their secreted vesicles, have the potential to be used as therapies that could progress to clinical trials. (2020-04-16)

Drug overcomes chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
In an international preclinical study, researchers found they could overcome chemotherapy resistance in clear cell ovarian cancer cell models using low doses of the drug 2-deoxy-D-glucose. The researchers will now look to trial the drug in patients. (2020-04-16)

Comparing smartphone-enabled blood pressure monitoring with regular care after heart attack
This randomized clinical trial compared blood pressure control after a heart attack among 200 patients who received either regular follow-up care of four visits to an outpatient clinic or who were given four smartphone-compatible devices (weight scale, blood pressure monitor, heart rhythm monitor and step counter) and had two care visits via a video connection and two outpatient clinic visits. (2020-04-16)

Prescribing an overdose: A chapter in the opioid epidemic
Research indicates that widespread opioid overprescribing contributed to the opioid epidemic. New research shows that this dangerous trend has apparently been coupled with another: inappropriate use of high-potency opioids. (2020-04-15)

Medicare coverage varies for transgender hormone therapies
A new study has shown substantial variability in access to guideline-recommended hormone therapies for older transgender individuals insured through Medicare. (2020-04-13)

Mayo Clinic offer guidance on treating COVID-19 patients with signs of acute heart attack
Much remains unknown about COVID-19, but many studies already have indicated that people with cardiovascular disease are at greater risk of COVID-19. There also have been reports of ST-segment elevation (STE), a signal of obstructive coronary artery disease, in patients with COVID-19 who after invasive coronary angiography show no sign of the disease. (2020-04-09)

False-negative COVID-19 test results may lead to false sense of security
As COVID-19 testing becomes more widely available, it's vital that health care providers and public health officials understand its limits and the impact false results can have on efforts to curb the pandemic. (2020-04-09)

Mayo Clinic research finds spina bifida surgery before birth restores brain structure
Surgery performed on a fetus in the womb to repair defects from spina bifida triggers the body's ability to restore normal brain structure, Mayo Clinic research discovered. (2020-04-01)

Hypothyroidism patients cite effectiveness in choosing alternative to standard therapy
Three in four hypothyroidism patients who chose desiccated thyroid extract (DTE) over the standard therapy said this option was more effective than other thyroid hormone medications, according to an analysis of comments in online patient forums accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)

Genetic testing for antiplatelet therapy post-PCI misses cut in cardiovascular events
An international clinical trial that used genetic testing to guide which antiplatelet medication was given to patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) did not meet its stated goal for cutting in half the incidence of serious adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in the year following the procedure, according to study results presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)

Blood test detects wide range of cancers, available to at risk individuals in clinical study
In a study involving thousands of participants, a new blood test detected more than 50 types of cancer as well as their location within the body with a high degree of accuracy, according to an international team of researchers led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (2020-03-30)

Mayo Clinic outlines approach for patients at risk of drug-induced sudden cardiac death in COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, continues to spread, leading to more than 20,000 deaths worldwide in less than four months. Efforts are progressing to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, but it's still likely 12 to 18 months away. (2020-03-25)

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