Current Mechanical Engineering News and Events

Current Mechanical Engineering News and Events, Mechanical Engineering News Articles.
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Can bacteria make stronger cars, airplanes and armor?
Biological systems can harness their living cells for growth and regeneration, but engineering systems cannot. Until now.Researchers are harnessing living bacteria to create engineering materials that are strong, tolerant, and resilient. (2021-02-22)

New "metalens" shifts focus without tilting or moving
An MIT-fabricated metalens shifts focus without tilting, shifting, or otherwise moving. The design may enable miniature zoom lenses for drones, cellphones, or night-vision goggles. (2021-02-22)

NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-demand drug testing use. (2021-02-22)

Bioengineered hybrid muscle fiber for regenerative medicine
Scientists regenerate damaged muscle tissue using cell reprogramming technology and natural-synthetic hybrid scaffold. (2021-02-21)

Swimming upstream on sound waves
ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. (2021-02-19)

Selective concentration of cationic species
POSTECH Professor Geunbae Lim Develops a Multiscale-Porous Anion Exchange Membrane. (2021-02-18)

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency
POSTECH-KAIST joint research team develops perfect SHEL using anisotropic metasurfaces. (2021-02-18)

In response to Stephen Colbert, FAU professor says 'spice it up'
A research professor gives a ''shout out'' to comedian Stephen Colbert. His motivation? Colbert previously referred to mathematical equations as the devil's sentences and an unnatural commingling of letters and numbers - the worst being the quadratic equation - an infernal salad of numbers, letters and symbols. In response, the professor suggests that mathematics education needs to be enlivened so that students will recognize that this discipline is not merely a necessary evil, but a vibrant, exciting and fascinating subject. (2021-02-17)

Researchers have proved that that ozone is effective in disinfecting Coronavirus
It is possible to destroy the virus within minutes by gaseous ozone, which can be produced synthetically indoors. The advantage of gaseous ozone over liquid disinfectants (such as alcohol and bleach) is its ability to treat entire rooms, including all objects found in it and hard-to-reach locations. (2021-02-17)

This robot doesn't need any electronics
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems. The team, led by Michael T. Tolley, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, details its findings in the Feb. 17, 2021 issue of Science Robotics. (2021-02-17)

Fueling the future: Novel two-polymer membrane boosts hydrogen fuel cell performance
Fuel cells are an attractive sustainable energy source due to their eco-friendly by-product, water. However, existing fuel cells are either expensive or low performance. Now, scientists from Korea have designed a robust and highly conductive fuel cell ion-exchange membrane using two readily available polymer materials and a unique technique, opening doors to fuel cells that are both cheap and high performing, bringing us closer to realizing a hydrogen economy. (2021-02-17)

Hydrogel promotes wound healing better than traditional bandages, gauzes
For explosion wounds as well as some incurred in disasters and accidents, severe hemorrhage is a leading cause of death. Hydrogel dressings, which have advanced in recent years, may help; they are good at promoting wound healing and can better meet the demands of different situations. Many are antibacterial, biodegradable, responsive, and injectable and can fill irregularly shaped wounds. In APL Bioengineering, researchers in China examine some of the recent advances. (2021-02-16)

Individual differences in Achilles tendon shape can affect susceptibility to injury
Individual variation in the shape and structure of the Achilles tendon may influence our susceptibility to injury later in life, says a study published today in eLife. (2021-02-16)

New discovery may enable accurate prediction of cancer spread before cancer develops
Researchers from Erler Group at the Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC) in Copenhagen have discovered that the rigidity of a thin membrane structure encompassing cells and lining all vessels regulates how easily cancer cells can breach tissues to spread through the body, and is thus a key determinant of cancer patient survival. The results are published in Nature Materials today. (2021-02-15)

New tool predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation
A mathematical model predicts the success of extubating patients on intensive mechanical ventilation. The results of the study by a research team from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona-Spain) and the Institute of Health Research Pere Virgili show a potential reduction of the current rate of reintubation from 9% to 1% by using machine learning tools. Data from a thousand intensive-care patients with respiratory difficulties has been processed and analysed to create this tool (2021-02-15)

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses
POSTECH professor Junsuk Rho's research team develops a transparent silicon without visible light loss by controlling the silicon atomic structure. (2021-02-14)

Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly
Researchers in Southampton and San Francisco have developed the first compact 3D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used. (2021-02-10)

The future of solar technology: New technology makes foldable cells a practical reality
International research team creates solar cells with unprecedented flexibility and resistance. (2021-02-10)

Origami powered by light
Some man-made materials can mimic plants' slow but steady reaction to light energy, usually triggered by lasers or focused ambient light. New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University has discovered a way to speed up this effect enough that its performance can compete against electrical and pneumatic systems. (2021-02-10)

Samara Polytech scientists proved the anti-cancer properties of a number of plant extracts
The composition of some extracts obtained from plant raw materials was studied at Samara Polytech, and their anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties were assessed. (2021-02-09)

Samara Polytech chemists simplify crystal structures
Samara Polytech scientists have developed new methods of modelling the crystal structure of chemical substances, which makes it possible to obtain additional information about the object under study, unknown in the initial experimental data, and also to find regularities determining its structure and properties. (2021-02-09)

NTUsg researchers develop flexible piezoelectric crystal
A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines. (2021-02-08)

Two-phase material with surprising properties
Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties - this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions. In these special polymers, the electro-mechanical coupling suddenly disappers - scientits at TU Wien have found out how. (2021-02-08)

Ural Federal University scientists developed a new way of synthesis of high-purity zircon
A research group from Ural Federal University synthesized high-purity single-phase zircon (ZrSiO4) and analyzed its structural, thermal, vibrational and optical properties. The results have been published in the Journal of Solid State Chemistry (Q2) (2021-02-05)

Tiny sensor technique reveals cellular forces involved in tissue generation
A team of Brown University researchers developed a technique that uses tiny polymer spheres to sense the forces at play as body tissue forms and grows. (2021-02-05)

New microscopy concept enters into force
The first demonstration of an approach that inverts the standard paradigm of scanning probe microscopy raises the prospect of force sensing at the fundamental limit. (2021-02-05)

Solving chronic pain during intercourse
Women suffering from chronic conditions that result in painful intercourse represent about 10% of females of reproductive age - triggering a combined economic burden of more than $7.7 billion per year - yet scant knowledge about the origins of this pain is preventing an effective way to treat it. (2021-02-04)

'Audeo' teaches artificial intelligence to play the piano
A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano. (2021-02-04)

Load-reducing backpack powers electronics by harvesting energy from walking
Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack, reported in ACS Nano, could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researchers say. (2021-02-03)

New piezoelectric material remains effective to high temperatures
Piezoelectric materials hold great promise as sensors and as energy harvesters but are normally much less effective at high temperatures, limiting their use in environments such as engines or space exploration. However, a new piezoelectric device developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and QorTek remains highly effective at elevated temperatures. (2021-02-03)

New global 'wind atlas' propels sustainable energy
Wind energy scientists at Cornell University have released a new global wind atlas - a digital compendium filled with documented extreme wind speeds for all parts of the world - to help engineers select the turbines in any given region and accelerate the development of sustainable energy. (2021-02-03)

Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist
The speed of light has come to 3D printing. Northwestern University engineers have developed a new method that uses light to improve 3D printing speed and precision while also, in combination with a high-precision robot arm, providing the freedom to move, rotate or dilate each layer as the structure is being built. The method introduces the 'on-the-fly' ability to manipulate the original design layer by layer and pivot the printing direction without recreating the model. (2021-02-03)

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the most definitive evidence to date that, of the two drugs recommended for light sedation of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU, one is as effective and safe as the other. (2021-02-02)

A show of force: Novel polymer that toughens up and changes color upon mechanical stress
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a polymer whose properties change markedly after being exposed to mechanical stress. In bulk form, the mechano-responsive polymer shows color changing, fluorescence, and self-strengthening abilities even under simple compression or extension. These fundamental findings are unprecedented in the field of mechanochemistry and could pave the way for numerous applications in materials science. (2021-02-02)

Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials
An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys. This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The new materials could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient. (2021-01-29)

NTU study finds Singapore public less keen on drone use in residential areas than industrial zones
When it comes to drones, the Singapore public is not as keen for them to be used to provide services around their living spaces, finds a study by researchers at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore). However, they are more accepting of drones being used in areas like recreational spots or industrial areas. (2021-01-28)

New catalyst moves seawater desalination, hydrogen production closer to commercialization
Seawater is abundant and cheap, making it a tempting resource to meet the world's growing need for clean drinking water and carbon-free energy. Now researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new catalyst that can be made quickly and inexpensively, bringing the technology closer to commercial reality. (2021-01-28)

Lasing mechanism found in water droplets
As reported in Advanced Photonics, Chen's NTU team recently discovered that when a water droplet interacts with a surface to form a contact angle, the interfacial molecular forces determine the geometry of a droplet resonator. Dramatic mechanical changes at the interface play a significant role in the optical oscillation of droplet resonators. (2021-01-28)

'Smart' cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have engineered cartilage cells to release an anti-inflammatory drug in response to stresses such cells undergo when they are compressed during weight bearing and movement. (2021-01-27)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

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