Current Mechanical Engineering News and Events

Current Mechanical Engineering News and Events, Mechanical Engineering News Articles.
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'Smart' cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have engineered cartilage cells to release an anti-inflammatory drug in response to stresses such cells undergo when they are compressed during weight bearing and movement. (2021-01-27)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

Researchers use nanomaterials to make 2D diamond clusters at room temperature
2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising material that can undergo transition to strong, super lightweight films. Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering led by Elisa Riedo have discovered that h-BN in layered, molecule-thin 2D sheets can phase transition to c-BN at room temperature. (2021-01-26)

UMass Amherst researchers develop technique to replicate bone-remodeling processes
A multidisciplinary research team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Institute for Applied Life Sciences (IALS) have developed a technique to replicate bone tissue complexity and bone-remodeling processes. This breakthrough could help researchers further their study of bone biology and assist in improving development of drugs for osteoporosis. (2021-01-26)

Titanium oxide nanotubes facilitate low-cost laser-assisted photoporation
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a nanosecond pulse laser-assisted photoporation method using titanium-oxide nanotubes (TNTs) for highly efficient and low-cost intracellular delivery. HeLa - human cervical cancer cells were cultured in the nanotubes and submerged in a solution of biomolecules. After cells were exposed to nanosecond pulse laser, we successfully delivered propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent dextran into cells with high efficiency and cell viability. (2021-01-25)

Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of Army aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body. High-fidelity simulations assist engineers in maximizing how much load a rotorcraft can lift or how far a missile can fly, but these simulations aren't cheap. A new turbulence model could change that (2021-01-25)

A microscopic look at aneurysm repair
Research from the University of Pittsburgh and the Mayo Clinic, published in Experimental Mechanics, is the first to show that there are two phases of wall restructuring after an aneurysm forms, the first beginning right away to reinforce the weakened points. (2021-01-25)

3-D printed Biomesh minimizes hernia repair complications
A newly-designed 3D-printed Biomesh effectively minimized postsurgical complications of hernia repair in an animal model. (2021-01-25)

No more needles for diagnostic tests?
The lab of Srikanth Singamaneni at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis developed a biosensing microneedle patch that can be applied to the skin, capture a biomarker of interest and, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity, allow clinicians to detect its presence. (2021-01-22)

Mechanism that produces rapid acceleration in clicking beetles identified
Snap-through unbending movement of the body is the main reason for the clicking beetle's fast acceleration. (2021-01-21)

Electron transfer discovery is a step toward viable grid-scale batteries
The way to boost electron transfer in grid-scale batteries is different than researchers had believed, a new study from the University of Michigan has shown. (2021-01-21)

A display that completely blocks off counterfeits
POSTECH research team led by Professor Junsuk Rho develops nanostructures capable of polarized optical encryption. (2021-01-21)

Defects may help scientists understand the exotic physics of topology
Real-world materials are usually messier than the idealized scenarios found in textbooks. Imperfections can add complications and even limit a material's usefulness. To get around this, scientists routinely strive to remove defects and dirt entirely, pushing materials closer to perfection. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have turned this problem around and shown that for some materials defects could act as a probe for interesting physics, rather than a nuisance. (2021-01-21)

New metamaterial offers reprogrammable properties
EPFL scientists have developed a metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be reprogrammed on demand and whose internal structure can be modified by applying a magnetic field. (2021-01-20)

Butterfly wing clap explains mystery of flight
The fluttery flight of butterflies has so far been somewhat of a mystery to researchers, given their unusually large and broad wings relative to their body size. Now researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied the aerodynamics of butterflies in a wind tunnel. The results suggest that butterflies use a highly effective clap technique, therefore making use of their unique wings. This helps them rapidly take off when escaping predators. (2021-01-20)

Two-photon polymerization of PEGda hydrogel microstructure with low threshold power with green laser
The fabrication of shape-memory hydrogel scaffolds not only requires biocompatibility, micrometre resolution, high mechanical strength, but also requires a low polymerisation threshold in high-water content environment to incorporate microstructures with biological tissues. Towards this goal, scientists from China and australite developed a new hydrogel formula that full fills this goal and demonstrated water-responsive structures with a shape-memory effect at a micrometre scale. This work is of importance for the development future reversible microdevices in biomedical engineering. (2021-01-20)

Merging technologies with color to avoid design failures
Various software packages can be used to evaluate products and predict failure; however, these packages are extremely computationally intensive and take a significant amount of time to produce a solution. Quicker solutions mean less accurate results. (2021-01-20)

Could "Power Walking" fuel the energy revolution? India is ready to step up
India has an energy problem. It currently relies heavily on coal and consumer demand is expected to double by 2040, making its green energy targets look out of reach. Part of the solution could come from harvesting energy from footsteps, say Hari Anand and Binod Kumar Singh from the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. Their new study, published in the De Gruyter journal Energy Harvesting and Systems, shows that Indian attitudes towards power generated through piezoelectric tiles are overwhelmingly positive. (2021-01-19)

New biomaterials can be 'fine-tuned' for medical applications
Researchers in the UK and the United States have succeeded in 'fine tuning' a new thermoplastic biomaterial to enable both the rate at which it degrades in the body and its mechanical properties to be controlled independently. (2021-01-19)

New COVID-19 model shows little benefit in vaccinating high-risk individuals first
Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, led a team that developed a novel theory and simulation platform for modeling COVID spread over the entire town of New Rochelle, located in Westchester County in New York State. The paper, ''High-Resolution Agent-Based Modeling of COVID-19 Spreading in a Small Town,'' published in Advanced Theory and Simulations, details the findings. (2021-01-19)

Inexpensive battery charges rapidly for electric vehicles, reduces range anxiety
Range anxiety, the fear of running out of power before being able to recharge an electric vehicle, may be a thing of the past, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are looking at lithium iron phosphate batteries that have a range of 250 miles with the ability to charge in 10 minutes. (2021-01-18)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

New tool removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems
'What goes in, must come out' is a familiar refrain. It is especially pertinent to the challenges facing UBC researchers who are investigating methods to remove chemicals and pharmaceuticals from public water systems. Cleaning products, organic dyes and pharmaceuticals are finding their ways into water bodies with wide-ranging negative implications to health and the environment, explains Dr. Mohammad Arjmand, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UBC Okanagan. (2021-01-18)

Newly developed GaN based MEMS resonator operates stably even at high temperature
JST PRESTO researcher developed a MEMS resonator that stably operates even under high temperatures by regulating the strain caused by the heat from gallium nitride (GaN). This device is small, highly sensitive and can be integrated with CMOS technology promising for the application to 5G communication, IoT timing device, on-vehicle applications, and advanced driver assistance system. (2021-01-15)

Breathing easier with a better tracheal stent
New research led by the University of Pittsburgh is poised to drastically improve the use of tracheal stents for children with airway obstruction. Researchers demonstrate for the first time the successful use of a completely biodegradable magnesium-alloy tracheal stent that safely degrades and does not require removal. (2021-01-15)

Experts reduce search times for novel high-entropy alloys 13,000-fold using Cuckoo Search
A major roadblock to computational design of high-entropy alloys has been removed, according to scientists at Iowa State University and Lehigh University. Engineers from the Ames Lab and Lehigh University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics have developed a process that reduces search time used for predictive design 13,000-fold. (2021-01-14)

Cancer models created by mechanical engineers offer new insight into tumor growth
In research published today in Integrative Biology, a team of engineers from Rensselaer developed an in vitro -- in the lab -- lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence. (2021-01-14)

Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

Protecting lungs from ventilator-induced injury
An unfortunate truth about using mechanical ventilation to save lives is that the pressure can cause further lung damage. Scientists have identified a helpful molecule produced by immune cells during ventilation and are working to boost that natural process in pursuit of a therapy that could lower the chances for lung damage in patients on vents. (2021-01-12)

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. The Department of Energy is determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and through the work of two UCF researchers, the DOE is one step closer to that goal. (2021-01-12)

Robot displays a glimmer of empathy to a partner robot
Like a longtime couple who can predict each other's every move, a Columbia Engineering robot has learned to predict its partner robot's future actions and goals based on just a few initial video frames. The study, conducted at Columbia Engineering's Creative Machines Lab led by Mechanical Engineering Professor Hod Lipson, is part of a broader effort to endow robots with the ability to understand and anticipate the goals of other robots, purely from visual observations. (2021-01-11)

Rice model offers help for new hips
Rice University engineers design a computational model that will ultimately serve as the engine to predict how long a hip implant could last for a specific patient. The unique model incorporates fluid dynamics and the physics of implant wear and aims to streamline trial-and-error in the design of future implants. (2021-01-11)

Liquid metal ink liberates form
POSTECH-Yonsei University joint research team develops liquid metal ink for 3D circuit lines. (2021-01-10)

Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10-12 seconds
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to testing, the platform will help to quantify patient immunological response to the new vaccines with precision. (2021-01-08)

UCF engineering and biology researchers collaborate to aid coral reef restoration
Florida's threatened coral reefs have a more than $4 billion annual economic impact on the state's economy, and University of Central Florida researchers are zeroing in on one factor that could be limiting their survival - coral skeleton strength. In a new study published in the journal Coral Reefs, UCF engineering researchers tested how well staghorn coral skeletons withstand the forces of nature and humans, such as impacts from hurricanes and divers. (2021-01-08)

Stem cells use a piston-like engine to 'drive' to their destinations
Researchers extracted stem cells from bone marrow and used hydrogels to mimic the tissues that compose their biological environments. They found that stem cells propel their nucleus into a needle-like protrusion that penetrates the physical barriers inside the body. The nucleus moves into the protrusion and, through a complex biochemical mechanism, inflates the protrusion like a balloon, creating an opening in the tissue wide enough for the entire stem cell to migrate through. (2021-01-08)

Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound ''drill'' to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results. (2021-01-07)

Researcher cracks the hidden strengthening mechanism in biological ceramics
In addition to adding strength, this design allows the structure to use its crack patterns to minimize damage into the inner shell. (2021-01-06)

Mighty morphing 3D printing
Engineers at the University of Maryland have created a new shape-changing or ''morphing'' 3D printing nozzle, which offers researchers new means for 3D printing ''fiber-filled composites.'' (2021-01-06)

Mechanophores: Making polymer crystallization processes crystal clear
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have come up with a new technique to evaluate the mechanical forces generated in polymer crystallization as they cool down from their molten state. In a new study published in Nature Communications, they used small, fluorescent molecules to visualize the crystallization process, guiding manufacturers in their goals to optimize polymer materials. (2021-01-05)

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