Current Medical Errors News and Events

Current Medical Errors News and Events, Medical Errors News Articles.
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Neural pathway critical to correcting behavioral errors related to psych disorders found
Mount Sinai researchers have identified a neural pathway through which the brain detects errors and guides subsequent behavioral improvement (2021-02-19)

Researchers develop algorithm to find possible misdiagnosis
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed an algorithm that can identify patients who may have been wrongly diagnosed. With the help of digital disease history, the algorithm is able to register disease trajectories that differ so much from normal trajectories that there may be a misdiagnosis. The algorithm has been developed on the basis of data from several hundreds of thousands of COPD patients. (2021-02-15)

UMass Amherst team helps demonstrate spontaneous quantum error correction
Published by the journal Nature, research co-authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Chen Wang, graduate students Jeffrey Gertler and Shruti Shirol, and postdoctoral researcher Juliang Li takes a step toward building a fault-tolerant quantum computer. They have realized a novel type of QEC where the quantum errors are spontaneously corrected. (2021-02-11)

Earliest signs of an immune response found in developing embryos
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation reveal that newly formed embryos clear dying cells to maximise their chances of survival. It is the earliest display of an innate immune response found in vertebrate animals to date. The findings may aid future efforts to understand why some embryos fail to form in the earliest stages of development, and lead to new clinical efforts in treating infertility or early miscarriages. (2021-02-10)

A novel approach to determine how carcinogenic bacteria find their targets
The gram-negative bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonize the stomachs of the majority of the world's population. Although most people may never experience major complications due to the pathogen, H. pylori infections increase the risk of certain types of gastric cancer, as well as other illnesses such as peptic ulcers and gastritis. (2021-02-10)

Best of both worlds: A hybrid method for tracking laparoscopic ultrasound transducers
In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Imaging, a team of scientists from the US have come up with a creative solution. Instead of relying entirely on either hardware- or CV-based tracking, they propose a hybrid approach that combines both methods. (2021-02-04)

Findings may help close door on COVID-19
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston have discovered what may be the Achilles' heel of the coronavirus, a finding that may help close the door on COVID-19 and possibly head off future pandemics. (2021-01-27)

A benchmark for single-electron circuits
Manipulating individual electrons with the goal of employing quantum effects offers new possibilities in electronics. In order to gain new insights into the physical origin and into metrological aspects of the small, but inevitable fundamental uncertainties governed by the rules of quantum mechanics, scientists from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt(PTB) and the University of Latvia have collaborated to develop a statistical testing methodology. Their results have been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-26)

Not everyone has equal access to crucial information that can stop the spread of COVID-19
A newly-published global survey of national health authority websites in nearly 200 countries has directly quantified COVID-19 information accessibility. Only a few of the countries examined fully adhered to internationally recognized accessibility guidelines. Websites from the majority of countries surveyed continue to contain accessibility errors that present significant barriers to people with disabilities. As a result, not everyone has equal access to government health websites and, therefore, vital information to stop the spread of COVID-19. (2021-01-26)

A new mechanism protects against cancer cell migration and neuron hyperexcitability
G3BP proteins inhibit the metabolic driver MTOR - a signaling protein that plays a central role in tumor diseases and developmental disorders of the brain. This is reported in this week┬┤s issue of the renowned journal Cell. The study was led by scientists from the University of Innsbruck and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in collaboration with the Medical University of Innsbruck and a Europe-wide research network. (2021-01-25)

A new tool to facilitate quicker, error-free software design
The tool permits the early detection of errors at any point during the modelling process, not just on completion, as is the case now (2021-01-15)

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers
Scientists at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu have found a way to develop optical quantum computers of a new type. Central to the discovery are rare earth ions that have certain characteristics and can act as quantum bits. These would give quantum computers ultrafast computation speed and better reliability compared to earlier solutions. The University of Tartu researchers Vladimir Hizhnyakov, Vadim Boltrushko, Helle Kaasik and Yurii Orlovskii published the results of their research in the scientific journal Optics Communications. (2021-01-15)

Error protected quantum bits entangled
For the first time, physicists from the University of Innsbruck have entangled two quantum bits distributed over several quantum objects and successfully transmitted their quantum properties. This marks an important milestone in the development of fault-tolerant quantum computers. The researchers published their report in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Scientists find the error source of a sea-ice model varies with the season
Scientists evaluated the sea-ice simulations of the Arctic regional ocean-ice coupling configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and found there were disagreements between the simulations and observations in both March and September. (2020-12-30)

Industry collaboration leads to important milestone in the creation of a quantum computer
One of the obstacles for progress in the quest for a working quantum computer has been that the working devices that go into a quantum computer and perform the actual calculations, the qubits, have hitherto been made by universities and in small numbers. But in recent years, a pan-European collaboration, in partnership with French microelectronics leader CEA-Leti, has been exploring everyday transistors--that are present in billions in all our mobile phones--for their use as qubits. (2020-12-28)

Beyond changing DNA itself, mutagens also cause errors in gene transcription
The discovery that toxic stressors can cause errors in gene transcription opens new avenues of research on diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and sheds light on the potential role of the ''transcriptome'' in aging. (2020-12-21)

The far-reaching effects of mutagens on human health
Mutagenic threats to a cell's subtle machinery may be far more widespread than previously appreciated. In a new study, Michael Lynch and his colleagues demonstrate that DNA mutation itself may represent only a fraction the health-related havoc caused by mutagens. The study highlights the ability of mutagenic compounds to also affect the process of transcription, during which a DNA sequence is converted (or transcribed) to mRNA, an intermediary stage preceding translation into protein. (2020-12-21)

Interventional radiology associated with an increased risk for preventable adverse events
In a review article in the journal Radiology, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), suggest there is a critical need to renew understanding of adverse events and complications within interventional radiology. They also call for a robust recommitment to patient safety and quality assurance in clinical practice, continuing medical education and graduate medical education. (2020-12-17)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

Designed a tool that will automate device programming in the IoT
UOC researchers develop new solutions to boost Industry 4.0 development (2020-12-10)

Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a study appearing December 10 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the frequency of exchangeless chromosomes is not affected by maternal age. (2020-12-10)

Researchers call for clarity on the definition of medicine misuse
A recent analysis of published studies provides a comprehensive overview of the terms and definitions used to characterize medicine misuse. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-09)

Examining association of physician burnout with suicidal thoughts, medical errors
Physicians were surveyed to examine the association between burnout and thoughts of suicide and self-reported medical errors after accounting for depression. (2020-12-09)

I see you: Honey bees use contagious and honest visual signal to deter attacking hornets
What do honey bees and deadly hornets have to do with issues surrounding ''fake news?'' UC San Diego-led research is providing new details about honey bees and their defenses against preying hornets. Using a common iPad, James Nieh and his colleagues conducted the first study that demonstrates that a contagious warning signal counters ''fake news'' in social insects. (2020-12-07)

Inclusion of patient headshots in electronic health records decreases order errors
Analysis of the millions of orders placed for participating patients over a two-year span showed the rate of wrong patient order entry to be 35 percent lower for patients whose photos were included in their EHR. (2020-11-13)

Know when to unfold 'em: Applying particle physics methods to quantum computing
Borrowing a page from high-energy physics and astronomy textbooks, a team of physicists and computer scientists at Berkeley Lab has successfully adapted and applied a common error-reduction technique to the field of quantum computing. (2020-11-05)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

Compression garments reduce strength loss after training
Regular training enhances your strength, but recovery is equally important. Elastic bandages and compression garments are widely used in sports to facilitate recovery and prevent injuries. Now, a research team from Tohoku University has determined that compression garments also reduce strength loss after strenuous exercise. (2020-10-30)

Research lowers errors for using brain signals to control a robot arm
Brain-computer interfaces have seen a large influx of research in an effort to allow precise and accurate control of physical systems. By measuring brain signals and implementing a clever feedback scheme, researchers from India and the UK have reduced the positional error in brain-controlled robot arms by a factor of 10, paving the way to greatly enhancing the quality of life for people suffering from strokes and neuro-muscular disorders. (2020-10-28)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Sports science: quality wins games
''Quality Wins Games'' - this is the conclusion drawn by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in their study ''Success Factors in Football: An Analysis of the German Bundesliga''. The most important success criteria they identified is avoiding errors in the defense, efficiency in scoring goals especially after counter-attacks and the market value of the team. The findings are reported in the International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport. (DOI: 10.1080/24748668.2020.1726157) (2020-10-27)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

Body MRI reinterpretations plagued by discrepancies and errors
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), secondary interpretations of body MRI at tertiary care centers identify a high rate of discrepancies--with primary errors being interpretive in origin--suggesting that subspecialty interpretations should be encouraged, and institutions should provide adequate resources for these interpretations to occur. (2020-10-16)

Prenatal cannabis exposure linked to cognitive deficits, altered behavior
Regular cannabis exposure in rats during pregnancy may cause their offspring to have long-term cognitive deficiencies, asocial behavior, and anxiety later in adulthood. (2020-10-14)

Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
Comparison of mid-range forecast model accuracy of Atlantic hurricane tracks from 2007 to 2019 revealed that when strong winds associated with upper-level troughs caused hurricanes to move northward, track forecast accuracy was lower. The accuracy of track forecasts in such cases was improved by including data collected over the Arctic Ocean in 2017, by reducing the error in forecasting upper-level troughs. Therefore, additional data collection at high latitudes can improve mid-latitude hurricane track forecasting. (2020-10-08)

COVID-19 outcomes in patients with rare inborn immune disorders
Garvan's Prof Stuart Tangye and KU Leuven's Prof Isabelle Meyts have co-led a multi-centre international consortium to assess the severity of COVID-19 in individuals with inborn errors of immunity. (2020-10-06)

New study reveals one way police officers can reduce shooting errors
In a new research paper published in Police Quarterly, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Assistant Professor Paul Taylor found officers can significantly improve shoot/no-shoot decisions by simply lowering the position of their firearm. (2020-10-05)

New algorithm could unleash the power of quantum computers
A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations. (2020-10-05)

Are brain-computer interface spellers secure?
Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), which aim to construct a pathway for people to interact with computers directly by thought, have received great attention in recent years. An electroencephalogram-based BCI speller, which allows the user to input text to computer using brain signals, is one of the most popular BCI systems. However, researchers in China show that these BCI spellers can be easily attacked, exposing a critical security concern in EEG-based BCI systems. (2020-10-03)

Some severe COVID-19 cases linked to genetic mutations or antibodies that attack the body
Two new studies offer an explanation for why COVID-19 cases can be so variable. A subset of patients has mutations in key immunity genes; other patients have autoantibodies that target the same components of the immune system. Both circumstances could contribute to severe forms of the disease. (2020-09-24)

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