Current Medical Errors News and Events | Page 2

Current Medical Errors News and Events, Medical Errors News Articles.
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Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. What happens in our brain when we read in the company of others? Is it the same as reading alone? Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the Carlos III Health Institute have found that company is conducive to a more creative and integrated understanding of language, whereas isolation favours more systematic and automatic language processing. (2020-09-22)

Complex phonological tests are useful for diagnosing reading dysfunction
HSE University researchers have confirmed that the level of phonological processing skills in children can impact their ability to master reading. Complex phonological tests are best suited to detect phonological impairment. The study was published on September 6, 2020, in the Journal of Research in Reading. (2020-09-18)

Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour. (2020-09-15)

Scientists explore the potential for further improvements to tropical cyclone track forecasts
In a recently published study, Chinese and American scientists explore what the past trend is in the reduction of TC forecast track error, and how such errors may be further reduced in future decades. (2020-09-13)

Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. (2020-09-10)

Researchers show how AI-controlled sensors could save lives in 'smart' hospitals and homes
Interdisciplinary researchers nationwide are developing AI systems that would go into hospital rooms and elder care homes, to weave 'ambient intelligence' into the places where health care is delivered in order to avoid fatal medical errors and improve therapeutic outcomes. (2020-09-09)

A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers
A paper recently published in Nature presents a protocol allowing for the error detection and the protection of quantum processors in case of qubit loss. This may prove to be essential for the future development of large-scale quantum computers (2020-09-09)

New method prevents quantum computers from crashing
Quantum information is fragile, which is why quantum computers must be able to correct errors. But what if whole qubits are lost? Researchers at the University of Innsbruck, in collaboration with RWTH Aachen University and University of Bologna, are now presenting a method in the journal Nature that allows quantum computers to keep going even if they lose some qubits along the way. (2020-09-09)

A molecular approach to quantum computing
Molecules in quantum superposition could help in the development of quantum computers. (2020-09-02)

The Newtonian gravitational constant: Latest advances of the measurements
The Newtonian gravitational constant G, which is one of the most important fundamental physical constants in nature, describes the strength of the gravitational interaction between objects, while it is considered to be one of the most difficult to measure accurately so far due to the extreme weakness and unshieldability of gravity. Scientists based in Sun Yat-sen University and Huazhong University of Science and Technology summarize the latest advances in measurements, and outline future development directions. (2020-08-27)

Medical errors increase following the spring change to daylight saving time
Seeking medical care after springing forward to daylight saving time could be a risky proposition. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found a statistically significant increase in adverse medical events that might be related to human error in the week after the annual time change in the spring. (2020-08-27)

New technique to prevent imaging cyberthreats proposed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
As part of his Ph.D. research, Ben-Gurion University researcher Tom Mahler has developed a technique using artificial intelligence that analyzes the instructions sent from the PC to the physical components using a new architecture for the detection of anomalous instructions. (2020-08-25)

Study hopes to encourage use of new technology to reduce errors in DNA testing
The paper published in PLOS Genetics points out that existing problems of paternity testing have occurred over many years. (2020-08-17)

Yale quantum researchers create an error-correcting cat
Yale physicists have developed an error-correcting cat -- a new device that combines the Schrödinger's cat concept of superposition (a physical system existing in two states at once) with the ability to fix some of the trickiest errors in a quantum computation. (2020-08-12)

Cricket umpires fumble on T20 calls
Cricket umpires struggle to please everyone at the best of time but the different formats of the game make it even harder for them, especially when it comes to LBW decisions. A PhD candidate in QUT's School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences has used data from Cricket Australia to conclude umpires are less accurate in calling LBW in T20 matches. His findings have just been published. (2020-08-11)

Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be 'misremembered' as done
Mundane behaviors such as taking a daily medication can eventually create false memories of completing the task, said Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab. (2020-07-17)

Genome guardians stop and reel in DNA to correct replication errors
New research shows how proofreading proteins prevent DNA replication errors by creating an immobile structure that calls more proteins to the site to repair the error. This structure could also prevent the mismatched region from being ''packed'' back into the cell during division. (2020-07-16)

Antibiotic allergy reporting may lead to resistance, higher costs, decreased safety
Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed medications, but in determining the most appropriate prescription for a patient, doctors and pharmacists often rely on inaccurate records of the patient's antibiotic allergies. Many records are incomplete, unclear or incorrect. (2020-07-14)

The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished. This morphology would be useful to identify cells that have chromosomal instability inherent in cancer cells. (2020-07-07)

Injections are two-and-a-half times safer when nurses use revamped guidelines
Injections are two-and-a-half times safer when nurses use revamped guidelines. (2020-07-06)

Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
Almost all land plants employ an army of molecular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Together with colleagues from Hanover, Ulm and Kyoto (Japan), researchers from the University of Bonn have now transferred one of these proofreaders from the moss Physcomitrium patens (previously known as Physcomitrella patens) into a flowering plant. Surprisingly, it performs its work there as reliably as in the moss itself. (2020-07-02)

Why don't confused patients call medicines helplines after discharge from hospital?
Research from the University of Bath in the UK suggests the best medicine-related support comes from hospital pharmacists, yet few discharged patients use helplines set up for this purpose. (2020-07-01)

New study examines recursive thinking
A multi-institutional research team found the cognitive ability to represent recursive sequences occurs in humans and non-human primates across age, education, culture and species. (2020-06-26)

Managing personal protective equipment in health care settings
An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides an overview on personal protective equipment (PPE) in health care settings, including evidence on effectiveness of N95 masks, as well as the importance of including health care worker perspectives on usage of this equipment. http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200575 (2020-06-25)

Increased caseloads may explain why reducing resident physicians' work hours doesn't always improve patient safety
When researchers launched a study comparing traditional, extended work shifts for resident physicians (24 hours+) with a new schedule that eliminated extended shifts, they expected the new schedule would reduce serious medical errors. But as they report in The New England Journal of Medicine, patient safety actually worsened at some hospitals. On further analysis, the new schedule increased residents' workload, which appeared to be a major factor driving medical errors. (2020-06-24)

CMU method makes more data available for training self-driving cars
For safety's sake, a self-driving car must accurately track the movement of pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles around it. Training those tracking systems may now be more effective thanks to a new method developed at Carnegie Mellon University. Generally speaking, the more road and traffic data available for training tracking systems, the better the results, and the CMU researchers have found a way to unlock a mountain of data. (2020-06-17)

Noise disturbs the brain's compass
Our sense of direction tends to decline with age. In 'Nature Communications', researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and experts from the USA report on new insights into the causes of this phenomenon. These study results could contribute to the development of diagnostic tools for early detection of dementia. (2020-06-10)

People make irrational trust decisions precisely
Online health information is deemed doubly less trustworthy if the text includes both ''shouting'' and spelling errors together, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). (2020-06-10)

A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. With the help of this ''lab-on-cables,'' which is equipped with cameras and a controller that minimizes tracking errors between the insect's and the robot's position, they successfully studied the free flight of moths up to a speed of 3 metres/second. (2020-06-10)

Electronic health records fail to detect up to 33% of medication errors
Despite improvements in their performance over the past decade, electronic health records (EHRs) commonly used in hospitals nationwide fail to detect up to one in three potentially harmful drug interactions and other medication errors, according to scientists at University of Utah Health, Harvard University, and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. In tests using simulated medical records, the researchers found that EHR systems consistently failed to detect errors that could injure or kill patients. (2020-05-29)

Directed protein evolution with CRISPR-Cas9
New area of application for gene scissors: Optimized proteins for biomedical research. (2020-05-26)

A stitch in time: How a quantum physicist invented new code from old tricks
Building large-scale quantum computers will require suppression of errors. Dr Ben Brown at the University of Sydney has used a neat trick to apply powerful 3D error-suppression codes in a 2D architecture, something one industry insider said many thought was impossible. (2020-05-22)

Why visual perception is a decision process
A popular theory in neuroscience called predictive coding proposes that the brain produces all the time expectations that are compared with incoming information. Errors arising from differences between actual input and prediction are then iteratively minimized along a hierarchical processing scheme. It is assumed that such stepwise iteration leads to updating of brain predictions so that internal prediction errors are finally explained away. (2020-05-12)

AI techniques in medical imaging may lead to incorrect diagnoses
Machine learning and AI are highly unstable in medical image reconstruction, and may lead to false positives and false negatives, a new study suggests. (2020-05-12)

To err is human, to learn, divine
New research describes a new model for how the brain interprets patterns in complex networks. They found that the ability to detect patterns stems in part from the brain's desire to represent things in the simplest way possible and that the brain is constantly weighing the pressures of complexity and simplicity when making decisions. (2020-05-08)

Single cell division error may be responsible for complexity in cancer genomes
A single error in cell division related to the formation of a chromosome bridge can trigger a cascade of mutational events, rapidly generating many of the defining features of cancer genomes, a new study suggests. (2020-04-16)

Why do so many pregnancies and in vitro fertilization attempts fail?
Scientists have created a mathematical model that can help explain why so many pregnancies and in vitro fertilization attempts fail. The Rutgers-led study, which may help to improve fertility, is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-04-13)

A new method for correcting systematic errors in ocean subsurface data
During almost four decades between 1940-1970s the majority of temperature observations in the ocean within the upper 200 meters was obtained by means of mechanical bathythermographs (MBT). A new study investigates the quality of MBT data and suggests a new method to correct the systematic erros in the data. (2020-04-08)

Lung cancer trials supported by drug industry stronger
Lung cancer clinical trials supported by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrate no more bias compared to studies funded by other sources, according to a study published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2020-03-25)

Found in mistranslation
In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. Postdoctoral fellow Laasya Samhita and project assistant Parth Raval induced different kinds of mistranslation in E. coli, manipulating both the genetic make-up of the cells and the environment in which they lived. They suggest a new hypothesis about why cells tolerate so much mistranslation of proteins. (2020-03-25)

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