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Current Medication Errors News and Events, Medication Errors News Articles.
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UCI, UCSD study: People more likely to pick up prescriptions via automated kiosks
Ever see long lines at the pharmacy counter and give up on a medication, or find that the drive is just a little too long? A study by the University of California, Irvine and UC San Diego found that patients using an automated kiosk in their workplace had better prescription pickup rates without sacrificing instruction from pharmacists. (2020-12-10)

Researchers call for clarity on the definition of medicine misuse
A recent analysis of published studies provides a comprehensive overview of the terms and definitions used to characterize medicine misuse. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-09)

I see you: Honey bees use contagious and honest visual signal to deter attacking hornets
What do honey bees and deadly hornets have to do with issues surrounding ''fake news?'' UC San Diego-led research is providing new details about honey bees and their defenses against preying hornets. Using a common iPad, James Nieh and his colleagues conducted the first study that demonstrates that a contagious warning signal counters ''fake news'' in social insects. (2020-12-07)

AI predicts which drug combinations kill cancer cells
A machine learning model developed in Finland can help us treat cancer more effectively. (2020-12-01)

Ongoing anticoagulant treatment does not seem to protect against severe COVID-19
DOAC (direct oral anticoagulant) pills are used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation by preventing blood clots. Even though blood clots are thought to contribute to complications from the new coronavirus infection, users of this class of drug do not seem to be protected against severe COVID-19, reports a large Swedish registry study from Karolinska Institutet published in The Journal of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

Nurse practitioners play key role in opioid addiction treatment in very rural areas
Giving nurse practitioners the authority to prescribe buprenorphine has brought that gold standard treatment for opioid addiction to people who might not have had access to it before, according to a new study. Looking at prescription drug monitoring data in Oregon before and after 2017, when nurse practitioners and physician assistants gained the authority to prescribe buprenorphine, researchers found that nurse practitioners almost immediately had an impact on access to buprenorphine in rural Oregon. (2020-11-23)

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research. Sleep disturbance is common among people with dementia and the impact for patients and their families is significant. To date there are no proven effective treatments available, however people with dementia are often prescribed Z-drugs (zopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem). The new study reveals that stronger doses of these drugs are linked with an increased risk of adverse effects. (2020-11-23)

Long-acting antipsychotic therapy plus cognitive training show promise for schizophrenia
UCLA scientists and colleagues found the use of long-acting antipsychotic medication combined with the use of cognitive training in group settings led to improved cognition and increased productivity. (2020-11-19)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-18)

A change of heart -- new drug for HCM reduces heart mass
For the first time, a medication has impacted heart muscle thickness and function for patients with the most common inherited heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rather than simply addressing their symptoms. (2020-11-16)

STRENGTH trial finds new fish oil medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events
A medication derived from fish oil, containing the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, was evaluated in a large, international study of more than 13,000 people who had existing heart disease or who were at high risk of heart disease due to other medical conditions. The medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events compared to a corn oil-based placebo in the STRENGTH trial. (2020-11-15)

Inclusion of patient headshots in electronic health records decreases order errors
Analysis of the millions of orders placed for participating patients over a two-year span showed the rate of wrong patient order entry to be 35 percent lower for patients whose photos were included in their EHR. (2020-11-13)

National study reveals new insights into avoidable harm in primary care
A national study of general practices in England has revealed the frequency of incidents of significant avoidable harm in primary care, and also important new details. For example, according to the research the main causes are diagnostic error (more than 60%), medication incidents (more than 25%) and delayed referrals (nearly 11%). (2020-11-11)

Romosozumab substantially builds bone density in hip and spine
New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology's annual meeting, reveals that romosozumab, an osteoporosis drug, produces substantial gains in bone mineral density in the hip and lumbar spine within one year, and that transitioning patients to a potent antiresorptive drug can lead to even more bone density gains. (2020-11-06)

Know when to unfold 'em: Applying particle physics methods to quantum computing
Borrowing a page from high-energy physics and astronomy textbooks, a team of physicists and computer scientists at Berkeley Lab has successfully adapted and applied a common error-reduction technique to the field of quantum computing. (2020-11-05)

Learning disorders and Parkinson's disease: tremor predicts effects of medication
The effect of dopaminergic medication on the learning abilities of patients with Parkinson's disease turns out to be linked to the presence of tremor symptoms. In patients who do not experience tremor, dopaminergic medication improves the ability to learn from rewards (reinforcement learning). Remarkably, the medication brings no benefit in reward learning to patients who do exhibit tremor. (2020-11-05)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

Compression garments reduce strength loss after training
Regular training enhances your strength, but recovery is equally important. Elastic bandages and compression garments are widely used in sports to facilitate recovery and prevent injuries. Now, a research team from Tohoku University has determined that compression garments also reduce strength loss after strenuous exercise. (2020-10-30)

New strategies suggested for critical heart care in the ICU
Critically ill heart patients are at increased risk of complications that are potentially preventable and associated with death, longer hospital stays and higher costs. Best practices to prevent complications include meticulous hand hygiene among the health care team, prompt removal of invasive medical devices and implementing a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals from various specialties. (2020-10-29)

Research lowers errors for using brain signals to control a robot arm
Brain-computer interfaces have seen a large influx of research in an effort to allow precise and accurate control of physical systems. By measuring brain signals and implementing a clever feedback scheme, researchers from India and the UK have reduced the positional error in brain-controlled robot arms by a factor of 10, paving the way to greatly enhancing the quality of life for people suffering from strokes and neuro-muscular disorders. (2020-10-28)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Sports science: quality wins games
''Quality Wins Games'' - this is the conclusion drawn by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in their study ''Success Factors in Football: An Analysis of the German Bundesliga''. The most important success criteria they identified is avoiding errors in the defense, efficiency in scoring goals especially after counter-attacks and the market value of the team. The findings are reported in the International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport. (DOI: 10.1080/24748668.2020.1726157) (2020-10-27)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

Study: 34% of older adults in the US are prescribed potentially inappropriate drugs
The prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older adults is linked to increased hospitalizations, and it costs patients, on average, more than $450 per year, according to a new University at Buffalo study. (2020-10-23)

Body MRI reinterpretations plagued by discrepancies and errors
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), secondary interpretations of body MRI at tertiary care centers identify a high rate of discrepancies--with primary errors being interpretive in origin--suggesting that subspecialty interpretations should be encouraged, and institutions should provide adequate resources for these interpretations to occur. (2020-10-16)

Drug repurposing
University of New Mexico researchers identify three existing drugs with the potential to clear SARS-CoV-2 infections. (2020-10-16)

Prenatal cannabis exposure linked to cognitive deficits, altered behavior
Regular cannabis exposure in rats during pregnancy may cause their offspring to have long-term cognitive deficiencies, asocial behavior, and anxiety later in adulthood. (2020-10-14)

Pharmacist-led digital intervention reduces hazardous prescribing in general practice
A pharmacist-led, new digital intervention that improves patient safety when prescribing medication in general practice reduced rates of hazardous prescribing by more than 40* per cent, 12 months after it had been introduced to 43 GP practices in Salford, finds a new study. Due to its success, plans are underway to roll it out across Greater Manchester. (2020-10-14)

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

Ten or more medications, often prescribed to older heart failure patients, raises concerns
More than half of older patients hospitalized for heart failure are discharged with 10 or more prescriptions, and most are not medications to treat heart failure or other cardiovascular conditions. This is important because older patients with heart failure taking 10 or more medications may be at risk for harm related to high medication burden. Regular medication review at each appointment is key to tailoring decisions for each patient while considering their overall health status. (2020-10-13)

Proactive steps linked to reduced medical costs, hospital visits for children with asthma
A new study looking at data from tens of thousands of children with asthma finds that several widely available interventions are associated with both reduced medical costs and a reduced likelihood that the children will need to visit an emergency room or stay in the hospital. (2020-10-12)

Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
Comparison of mid-range forecast model accuracy of Atlantic hurricane tracks from 2007 to 2019 revealed that when strong winds associated with upper-level troughs caused hurricanes to move northward, track forecast accuracy was lower. The accuracy of track forecasts in such cases was improved by including data collected over the Arctic Ocean in 2017, by reducing the error in forecasting upper-level troughs. Therefore, additional data collection at high latitudes can improve mid-latitude hurricane track forecasting. (2020-10-08)

Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well. Some of those pills, capsules and tablets may interact with one another in ways that could put them at risk. But a new poll shows that most people over 50 haven't connected with a pharmacist to check for potential clashes among all the things they take, or the potential to save money on them. (2020-10-07)

New study reveals one way police officers can reduce shooting errors
In a new research paper published in Police Quarterly, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Assistant Professor Paul Taylor found officers can significantly improve shoot/no-shoot decisions by simply lowering the position of their firearm. (2020-10-05)

New algorithm could unleash the power of quantum computers
A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations. (2020-10-05)

Are brain-computer interface spellers secure?
Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), which aim to construct a pathway for people to interact with computers directly by thought, have received great attention in recent years. An electroencephalogram-based BCI speller, which allows the user to input text to computer using brain signals, is one of the most popular BCI systems. However, researchers in China show that these BCI spellers can be easily attacked, exposing a critical security concern in EEG-based BCI systems. (2020-10-03)

Awakening after a sleeping pill
A patient who could not move and talk spontaneously for eight years started to do so again after being administered a sleeping pill. The spectacular but temporary effect was visualized with brain scans, giving researchers from Radboud university medical center and Amsterdam UMC a better understanding of this disorder's underlying neurophysiological processes. The article has been published in Cortex. (2020-10-02)

Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells. This is shown by a newly published study from biomedicine researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark. (2020-10-02)

Study links low immunity to poor outcomes in patients with HIV who contract COVID-19
Clinical trials are testing whether medications that treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also treat COVID-19, leading some patients with HIV to believe they might be protected against the coronavirus. But a researcher from the MU School of Medicine not only found patients with HIV are susceptible to the virus, she also discovered which factors increased the risk of hospitalization and death. (2020-09-30)

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