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Current Medication News and Events, Medication News Articles.
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Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well. Some of those pills, capsules and tablets may interact with one another in ways that could put them at risk. But a new poll shows that most people over 50 haven't connected with a pharmacist to check for potential clashes among all the things they take, or the potential to save money on them. (2020-10-07)

Awakening after a sleeping pill
A patient who could not move and talk spontaneously for eight years started to do so again after being administered a sleeping pill. The spectacular but temporary effect was visualized with brain scans, giving researchers from Radboud university medical center and Amsterdam UMC a better understanding of this disorder's underlying neurophysiological processes. The article has been published in Cortex. (2020-10-02)

Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells. This is shown by a newly published study from biomedicine researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark. (2020-10-02)

Study links low immunity to poor outcomes in patients with HIV who contract COVID-19
Clinical trials are testing whether medications that treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also treat COVID-19, leading some patients with HIV to believe they might be protected against the coronavirus. But a researcher from the MU School of Medicine not only found patients with HIV are susceptible to the virus, she also discovered which factors increased the risk of hospitalization and death. (2020-09-30)

Don't sleep on the hypnotic potential of thalidomide
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel molecular pathway for the hypnotic effects of thalidomide. By comparing the effects of thalidomide on the sleep of normal mice and mice in which the protein cereblon was resistant to thalidomide, the researchers found that thalidomide acted independently of cereblon but similarly to general anesthetics and sedatives to induce sleep. These findings could help develop thalidomide-like hypnotic drugs without its teratogenic effects. (2020-09-23)

Metformin treatment linked to slowed cognitive decline
A six-year study of older Australians with type 2 diabetes has uncovered a link between metformin use, slower cognitive decline and lower dementia rates. (2020-09-23)

Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages. (2020-09-21)

The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control. (2020-09-21)

Study shows the major impact of diabetes on the risk of falls
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year (21-25 September), shows that having type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a 33% increase in the risk of falls compared with the general population, while having type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 19% increased risk of falls. (2020-09-20)

Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication, study finds
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study by a Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigator. (2020-09-17)

One in 10 older dental patients inappropriately prescribed opioids
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that a significant proportion of older patients receiving opioids at dental visits also use psychotropic medications -- a potentially harmful combination. Their findings are published in the journal Pharmacotherapy. (2020-09-16)

TV ads for psoriasis and eczema medications portray few people of color
Commercials from pharmaceutical companies advertising medication to treat psoriasis and eczema lack people from racial and ethnic minorities, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (2020-09-15)

Henry ford study finds certain immuno suppressing drugs do not increase risk for COVID-19
Patients on immunosuppressive therapy for common skin and rheumatic diseases like psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis are not at increased risk for contracting COVID-19 and should continue taking their medicine as prescribed, say Henry Ford Health System dermatology researchers in a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (2020-09-14)

The pharmacist's role in HIV care in France
In France, antiretroviral treatment (ARV) can be dispensed by hospitals and/or community pharmacies. A recent study published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives examined the pharmacist's role in HIV care in this country. (2020-09-10)

'One size fits all' medication approach doesn't work in pregnancy
New research led by the University of South Australia shows that a blanket approach to prescribing medication during pregnancy may put low birth weight babies at risk for the rest of their lives. (2020-09-08)

Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers. (2020-09-07)

Texas A&M researchers develop treatment for canine ocular condition using turmeric
Researchers at Texas A&M University have produced a therapeutic derived from turmeric, a spice long-praised for its natural anti-inflammatory properties, that shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that leads to pain and reduced vision. (2020-09-03)

Blood pressure-lowering is even more beneficial than previously thought
Blood pressure medication can prevent heart attacks and strokes - even in people with normal blood pressure. That's the finding of late breaking research presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.1 ''Greater drops in blood pressure with medication lead to greater reductions in the risk of heart attacks and strokes,'' said principal investigator Professor Kazem Rahimi of the University of Oxford, UK. (2020-09-01)

Large study finds no link between blood pressure medication and cancer
There is no evidence that blood pressure lowering drugs increase the risk of cancer, according to the most extensive study conducted on the topic. The late breaking research is presented today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-31)

Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-31)

How to treat high blood pressure without ruining your sex life
Men with untreated high blood pressure have poorer penile blood flow than those with normal blood pressure, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.1 The differences disappeared with blood pressure medication. The results provide reassurance to men concerned about the effects of blood pressure-lowering medications. (2020-08-28)

The patients left behind by HIV research
People from BAME communities, women and heterosexual men are being left behind by HIV research. Medication to manage HIV is effective at keeping people well. But over half of people with HIV do not take their medication correctly. New research shows that the problem could be in the way studies are designed - with BAME communities, women and straight men under-represented. The researchers say this imbalance must be fixed, to keep a diverse population of HIV patients living longer, healthier lives. (2020-08-26)

Treatment for teen anxiety
In a new National Institute of Mental Health-funded study, led by Jeffrey Strawn and published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, UC researchers took a first look at one particular medication for treatment of anxiety disorders in pediatric patients to see if it was beneficial. (2020-08-25)

Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medication. (2020-08-24)

Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites. (2020-08-18)

Chatbots delivering psychotherapy help decrease opioid use after surgery
A study showed that patients receiving messages from a chatbot used a third fewer opioids after fracture surgery, and their overall pain level fell, too. (2020-08-17)

Short-term use of HIV-prevention medication protects at-risk men on vacation
Men at particular risk for HIV are very likely to consistently take prevention medication during vacations when their odds of contracting the virus are higher, according to a new study. The findings indicate that short-term use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication could be a highly successful way to prevent the spread of HIV in men who have sex with men and have difficulty with long-term PrEP use. It may also work to transition men to long-term PrEP use. (2020-08-12)

COVID-19 clinical trials lack diversity
Despite disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death among people of color, minority groups are significantly underrepresented in COVID-19 clinical trials. (2020-08-11)

Smartwatch tracks medication levels to personalize treatments
Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine -- where an ideal drug and dosages can be tailored to an individual. (2020-08-07)

Radboudumc research leads to simplified dosage of HIV medicine for children
Children living with HIV can benefit from an adapted, simpler combination therapy. It is now clear that the use of one, widely available, pill of dolutegravir in children yields equally good treatment results as a combination of several, less readily available pills of that drug. Especially in countries where the number of infections is high and good care is less accessible, this makes it easier to treat children. These results are included in the World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines. (2020-08-04)

Headline news: Botox injections may lessen depression
By analyzing the FDA database of adverse drug effects, UC San Diego researchers discovered that people who received Botox injections -- not just in the forehead -- reported depression significantly less often than patients undergoing different treatments for the same conditions. (2020-07-30)

New survey finds large racial divide in concern over ability to pay for COVID-19 treatment
People of color are far more likely to worry about their ability to pay for healthcare if diagnosed with COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to a new survey from nonprofit West Health and Gallup. By a margin of almost two to one (58% vs. 32%), non-White adults report that they are either 'extremely concerned' or 'concerned' about the potential cost of care. That concern is three times higher among lower-income versus higher-income households (60% vs. 20%). (2020-07-29)

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children
Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures. However, a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care shows ibuprofen is an effective medication for fracture pain in children and its use does not affect fracture healing. (2020-07-22)

Skin cancer treatments could be used to treat other forms of the disease
The creation of a silica nanocapsule could allow treatments that use light to destroy cancerous or precancerous cells in the skin to also be used to treat other types of cancer. Such are the findings of a study by INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) professors Fiorenzo Vetrone and Federico Rosei, in collaboration with an international research team. (2020-07-21)

Stepping-down asthma medication may reduce costs without worsening health out
International guidelines for asthma treatment recommend clinicians find the minimum effective dose that can control symptoms, yet asthma patients are increasingly prescribed high doses of medication. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Dr. Chloe Bloom at Imperial College London, United Kingdom and colleagues found that stepping-down medication doses did not increase asthma exacerbations and could significantly reduce medication costs. (2020-07-21)

Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. CKD is readily identified with simple blood and urine tests that are often in a patient's health record yet providers usually do not diagnose the CKD and inform the patient. This study demonstrates that implementation of a decision support system within the electronic health records system can increase provider awareness of CKD. (2020-07-16)

COVID-19: Patients improve after immune-suppressant treatment
Most patients hospitalized with COVID-19 (coronavirus) pneumonia experienced improvement after receiving a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug normally given for rheumatoid arthritis, according to an observational study at Cedars-Sinai. Outcomes for patients who received the drug, tocilizumab, included reduced inflammation, oxygen requirements, blood pressure support and risk of death, compared with published reports of illness and death associated with severely ill COVID-19 patients. (2020-07-15)

Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
A Keck Medicine of USC study reveals that kappa opioids, a significantly less addictive opioid, may preserve cartilage in joints and ease pain (2020-07-13)

Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant. Virologists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen have successfully shown that a previously approved medication used in cancer treatment could help inhibit this virus infection. Due to the special mechanism of action, the virus cannot develop defence strategies. (2020-07-13)

Hospital improves on-time administration of medication to Parkinson patients
Amsterdam, NL, July 9, 2020 - Timely administration of anti-Parkinson drugs is a significant issue for hospitalized patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with late or missed doses resulting in longer stays and worse outcomes. As part of a quality improvement project, a multidisciplinary team was able to change the culture at a US hospital by using a series of measures to ensure PD patients receive medications on time. Their findings are published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2020-07-09)

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