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Current Medications News and Events, Medications News Articles.
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New nanosystem from Tel Aviv university enhances treatment for melanoma in animal models
Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro of TAU's Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the Sackler School of Medicine, have developed an innovative nanotechnological drug delivery system that significantly enhances the effectiveness of treatment for the aggressive skin cancer melanoma. (2020-09-08)

Common class of drugs linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
UC San Diego researchers report that a class of drugs used for a broad array of conditions, from allergies and colds to hypertension and urinary incontinence, may be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, particularly in older adults at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-09-04)

Texas A&M researchers develop treatment for canine ocular condition using turmeric
Researchers at Texas A&M University have produced a therapeutic derived from turmeric, a spice long-praised for its natural anti-inflammatory properties, that shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that leads to pain and reduced vision. (2020-09-03)

Protein discovery could improve type 2 diabetes treatment
A world first discovery of how a protein works in the liver could lead to a more effective type 2 diabetes drug. / The University of Melbourne-led study found that the SMOC1 protein, which is naturally produced by the liver, can decrease blood glucose levels. An engineered form of SMOC1 could therefore potentially treat people with type 2 diabetes. (2020-09-02)

Common drugs tied to increased risk of cognitive decline
A class of drugs used for many conditions, including allergies, colds, high blood pressure and depression, may be associated with an increased risk of developing mild thinking and memory problems, particularly in people who have genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease or markers of this condition, according to a study published in the Sept. 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-09-02)

Risk of heart attacks halves in patients with diabetes in 15 years
Dramatic reductions in the risk of heart attacks in patients with diabetes coincides with major increases in the use of preventive medications. That's the finding of late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. 'Our results suggest that when patients are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, starting medications to prevent cardiovascular disease has a substantial impact on the risk of heart attacks and premature death,' said principal investigator Dr. Christine Gyldenkerne of Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. (2020-08-29)

Seizures during menstrual cycle linked to drug-resistant epilepsy
More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don't work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments. (2020-08-26)

None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk
Among the 41 most common blood pressure medications, none of them raised the risk of depression, according to an analysis from Denmark. The study also found that some high blood pressure medications lowered the risk of depression. These findings may help guide medical professionals in selecting the right hypertension medication, particularly for people with a personal or family history of depression. (2020-08-24)

Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medication. (2020-08-24)

Blood pressure medication improves COVID-19 survival rates
New research finds that medication for high blood pressure could improve Covid-19 survival rates and reduce the severity of infection. Researchers studied 28,000 patients taking antihypertensives - a class of drugs that are used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). They found that the risk of severe Covid-19 illness and death was reduced for patients with high blood pressure who were taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) or Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARB). (2020-08-23)

These drugs carry risks and may not help, but many dementia patients get them anyway
Nearly three-quarters of older adults with dementia have filled prescriptions for medicines that act on their brain and nervous system, but aren't designed for dementia, a new study shows. That's despite the special risks that such drugs carry for older adults -- and the lack of evidence that they actually ease the dementia-related behavior problems that often prompt a doctor's prescription in patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. (2020-08-18)

Patients' access to opioid treatment cumbersome
The 'secret shopper' study used trained actors attempting to get into treatment with an addiction provider in 10 US states. The results, with more than 10,000 unique patients, revealed numerous challenges in scheduling a first-time appointment to receive medications for opioid use disorder, including finding a provider who takes insurance rather than cash. (2020-08-14)

Research suggests greater access to specific HIV and tuberculosis medications is needed
A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB. (2020-08-07)

Heart disease medications underused among Hispanic/Latino populations with PAD
Recommended heart medications are underused among Hispanic/Latino people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Only a quarter to slightly more than half of Hispanic/Latino study participants with PAD reported taking recommended medications to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and to prevent blood clots. (2020-08-05)

Inappropriate prescriptions sending hospitalized seniors back to the ER
Two in three hospitalized seniors are prescribed drugs that should be avoided by older adults, increasing the risk of injury and adverse drug reactions. Improving hospital prescribing practices can reduce the frequency of inappropriate medications and resulting harm, according to a new study led by McGill University researchers. (2020-08-05)

Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals
Cannabinoid-containing products may alter the effects of some prescription drugs, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They published information that could help medical professionals make safe prescribing choices for their patients who use prescription, over-the-counter or illicit cannabinoid products. (2020-08-03)

Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects
A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans. The research was published online on July 23, 2020 in the journal Chemosphere. (2020-07-27)

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children
Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures. However, a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care shows ibuprofen is an effective medication for fracture pain in children and its use does not affect fracture healing. (2020-07-22)

How much postmenopause weight gain can be blamed on weight-promoting medications?
Abdominal weight gain, which is common during the postmenopause period, is associated with an array of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease. A new study suggests that the use of antidepressants, beta-blockers, and insulin during the menopause transition is partially to blame for such unhealthy weight gain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-07-15)

COVID-19 and the heart: Searching for the location of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor
Nearly 20% of COVID-19-associated deaths are from cardiac complications, yet the mechanisms from which these complications arise have remained a topic of debate in the cardiology community. One hypothesis centers on the infection of the heart itself. To address this, MMRI Assistant Professor Dr. Nathan Tucker, in collaboration with the Broad Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, and Bayer US, report the distribution of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor in a manuscript published in Circulation. (2020-07-14)

STRIDE study tests ways to prevent injuries from falls
Every year about one in three adults age 65 and older takes a fall, and 20 to 30% of those who fall suffer significant injuries such as head trauma or a broken hip. A new study shows how difficult it is to prevent these injuries, even with help from primary care providers. (2020-07-12)

Hospital improves on-time administration of medication to Parkinson patients
Amsterdam, NL, July 9, 2020 - Timely administration of anti-Parkinson drugs is a significant issue for hospitalized patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with late or missed doses resulting in longer stays and worse outcomes. As part of a quality improvement project, a multidisciplinary team was able to change the culture at a US hospital by using a series of measures to ensure PD patients receive medications on time. Their findings are published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2020-07-09)

Older, critically ill patients with COVID-19 may have increased risk of bradycardia with lopinavir and ritonavir
The combined use of antiretroviral medications lopinavir and ritonavir, previously used to treat SARS-Cov-1 and MERS-Cov patients, appeared to cause bradycardia in 22% of elderly, critically ill COVID-19 patients, in a small study in France. Bradycardia was resolved in all patients after discontinuation or dose reduction of both medications. (2020-07-09)

Common hypertension medications may reduce colorectal cancer risk
People who take angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-i) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for conditions such as high blood pressure were less likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer after having a normal colonoscopy. This is the first study to show potential benefits on colorectal cancer development from these commonly prescribed hypertension medications, based on a study of more than 185,000 patients. (2020-07-06)

Patients may be exposed to hormone-disrupting chemicals in medication, medical supplies
Health care providers may unintentionally expose patients to endocrine- disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by prescribing certain medications and using medical supplies, according to a perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-07-02)

Survey: Alternative medicine is widespread among people with MS
A new survey of more than 1,000 people with multiple sclerosis finds that an overwhelming majority use complementary and alternative medicine, with many using cannabis. In a sign of broader societal acceptance of treatments beyond conventional medications, the survey found that patients are nine times more likely to talk with their neurologist about the use of alternative therapies than patients in a similar survey conducted in 2001. (2020-06-25)

Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines
Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life. (2020-06-24)

Should nursing home residents nearing the end of life continue taking statins?
A team of researchers conducted a study to learn more about statin use among older adults, especially those nearing the end of their lives. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, evaluated statin use by people with life-limiting conditions across nearly all U.S. nursing homes. The researchers hoped to identify statin use among nursing home residents who were unlikely to benefit from treatment. (2020-06-24)

Should diabetes treatment lessen for older adults approaching the end of life?
Researchers published one of the first national studies to examine overtreatment and deintensification of diabetes management in nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia. (2020-06-24)

Study discovers BAM15 as a potential treatment for obesity
A new study offers the first evidence that a protein named BAM15 acts as an energy uncoupler and could be an effective drug for treating obesity and related diseases. (2020-06-10)

Study investigates potential for gut microbiome to alter drug safety and efficacy
Princeton University researchers have developed an approach for studying how the gut microbiome chemically alters oral medications, unlocking possibilities for improving efficacy, reducing side effects, and creating drugs personalized to an individual's microbiome. (2020-06-10)

Undisclosed financial conflicts of interest in Canadian clinical guidelines on medications
Failure to disclose organizational financial conflicts of interest by producers of Canadian clinical practice guidelines on medications is widespread, pointing to the need for reform, a new research paper highlights in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191737. (2020-06-08)

Blood pressure medications help even the frailest elderly people live longer
Taking prescription blood pressure medication helped even the frailest elderly patients live longer, according to a large study in Italy. While the improved survival benefit was found in all older people, the healthier older people survived longer than those with multiple medical conditions. (2020-06-08)

Study shows opioid, sedative and antidepressant use pre-surgery leads to worse outcomes
A study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers showed that patients who already used opioids, sedatives or antidepressants prior to colorectal surgery experience significantly more complications post-surgery. (2020-06-08)

Global oncology pharmacists face restricted access to essential PPE items
Oncology pharmacy practitioners around the globe are fighting to provide cancer patients high quality cancer care with increasingly limited and sometimes restricted personal protective equipment supply as well as impaired access to essential anticancer medication, according to University of California, Irvine-led study. (2020-06-08)

Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation
A review of 56 randomized clinical trials finds that psychological and behavioral therapies may be effective non-drug treatments for reducing disease-causing inflammation in the body. (2020-06-03)

Adherence to oral diabetes drugs may improve survival in diabetics with colorectal cancer
Among patients with both colorectal cancer and diabetes in Korea, those who had a high adherence to their oral diabetes medication had a significantly reduced risk of overall mortality compared with those with lower adherence. (2020-06-01)

Effect of reducing blood pressure medications on blood pressure control in older adults
Whether the amount of blood pressure medications taken by older adults could be reduced safely and without a significant change in short-term blood pressure control was the objective of this randomized clinical trial that included 534 adults 80 and older. For some older adults the potential risks of continuing treatment with multiple medications may outweigh the benefits. (2020-05-26)

Anti-obesity medications mitigate weight regain in RYGB surgery patients
Researchers have discovered that anti-obesity medications such as phentermine and topiramate, used individually or in combination, can significantly reduce weight regain in patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, according to a retrospective study published online in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. (2020-05-22)

NUI Galway research show blood pressure lowering reduces risk of developing dementia
Research completed in NUI Galway has shown that lowering blood pressure by taking blood pressure medications reduces the risk of developing dementia and cognitive impairment by 7%. The findings are published today in a leading international medical journal, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-05-21)

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