Current Memories News and Events

Current Memories News and Events, Memories News Articles.
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Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survival
Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their 'memories' to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects. (2020-12-01)

Neuroscientists measure fans' reactions to the big game
In a study published November 25 in the journal Neuron, researchers show how the feelings of surprise experienced while watching sports creates shifts in brain patterns. These shifts are important for neuroscientists to understand because they contribute to the formation of memories that are particularly strong. (2020-11-25)

Why experiences are better gifts for older children
What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago. (2020-11-24)

Stronger memories can help us make sense of future changes
Research from the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences in Arts & Sciences finds a new relationship between memory and the ability to incorporate changes into one's understanding of the world. (2020-11-24)

Memories of past events retain remarkable fidelity even as we age
Even though people tend to remember fewer details about past events as time goes by, the details they do remember are retained with remarkable fidelity, according to a new study. This finding holds true regardless of the age of the person or the amount of time that elapsed since the event took place. (2020-11-24)

Imaging method reveals a 'symphony of cellular activities'
MIT researchers have developed a way to simultaneously image up to five different molecules within a cell, by targeting glowing reporters to distinct locations inside the cell. This approach could allow scientists to learn much more about the complex signaling networks that control most cell functions. (2020-11-23)

Survey: Americans likely to attend large holiday gatherings despite COVID-19
A new national survey by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that although a majority of Americans plan to take precautions at holiday gatherings, such as social distancing and asking those with COVID symptoms not to attend, many will also put themselves at risk. Nearly two in five report they will likely attend a gathering with more than 10 people and a third will not ask guests to wear masks. (2020-11-12)

Using light to reprogramme the brain's GPS
Neuroscientists at UCL have used laser beams to ''switch on'' neurons in mice, providing new insight into the hidden workings of memory and showing how memories underpin the brain's inner GPS system. (2020-11-06)

Human intelligence just got less mysterious says Leicester neuroscientist
NEUROSCIENCE EXPERTS from the University of Leicester have released research that breaks with the past fifty years of neuroscientific opinion, arguing that the way we store memories is key to making human intelligence superior to that of animals. (2020-11-05)

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline
The happier we feel, the less likely we are to experience memory decline. (2020-10-29)

Remember that fake news you read? It may help you remember even more
Thinking back on a time you encountered false information or ''fake news'' may prime your brain to better recall truthful memories. (2020-10-16)

Astrocytes build synapses after cocaine use in mice
Drugs of abuse, like cocaine, are so addictive due in part to their cellular interaction, creating strong cellular memories in the brain that promote compulsive behaviors. A new study shows that cocaine use in mice leads to the formation of synapses by an unexpected architect: a type of cell called astrocytes. (2020-10-15)

Remembering novelty
The brain and its functions still pose many open questions. One of them is how exactly we form long-term memories about the environment. In a new study Ryuichi Shigemoto and his group from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) together with researchers from Aarhus University and the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan discovered a new signaling pathway in the hippocampus area of the brain that regulates how information about new environments is transferred into long-term memory. (2020-10-15)

Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. The findings have implications for our understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-07)

Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks - the excitatory and inhibitory networks. The excitatory neurons are involved in creating a memory trace, and the inhibitory neurons block out background noise and allow long-term learning to take place. (2020-10-07)

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. (2020-10-05)

Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
New brain research shows that writing by hand helps children learn more and remember better. At the same time, schools are going more and more digital, and a European survey shows that Norwegian children spend the most time online of 19 countries in the EU. (2020-10-01)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Scientists "scent train" honeybees to boost sunflowers' seed production
If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on September 17 have found that scent training honeybees might work in a similar way--and that this approach could make bees more efficient in pollinating crops. The findings show that honeybees given food scented with sunflower odors led to a significant increase in sunflower crop production. (2020-09-17)

Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. By studying both human and mouse brain activity, they report that this process happens in a region of the brain called the hippocampus. (2020-09-17)

The brain's memory abilities inspire AI experts in making neural networks less 'forgetful'
Artificial intelligence (AI) experts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Baylor College of Medicine report that they have successfully addressed what they call a ''major, long-standing obstacle to increasing AI capabilities'' by drawing inspiration from a human brain memory mechanism known as ''replay.'' (2020-09-17)

Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. (2020-09-08)

Unlocking the mysteries of the brain
A research team highlights the mechanisms underlying memory and learning capacity -- specifically, how our brains process, store and integrate information. (2020-08-26)

Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)

Can sleep protect us from forgetting old memories?
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that sleep may help people to learn continuously through their lifetime by encoding new memories and protecting old ones. (2020-08-04)

Transcranial stimulation to prevent fear memories from returning
A research group at the University of Bologna developed a new non-invasive experimental protocol to alter the memory of learned fear experiences, thus paving the way for treatments to overcome traumatic events (2020-07-30)

Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)

A survey on optical memory and optical RAM technologies
The ability to store with light and built promising optical memories has been an intriguing research topic for more than two decades. To shed light on optical memory physical mechanisms and evaluate their practical perspective, Dr. Theoni Alexoudi and Prof. Nikos Pleros from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and prof. George Kanellos from Bristol University have made an in-depth review analysis describing how optical memories' key metrics have been transformed over the past 25 years. (2020-07-21)

Study shows how our brains remain active during familiar, repetitive tasks
New research, based on earlier results in mice, suggests that our brains are never at rest, even when we are not learning anything about the world around us. (2020-07-14)

Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found. (2020-07-13)

Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins. An international team led by the joint research group of Prof. Dr. Matias Bargheer at HZB and the University of Potsdam has now observed experimentally for the first time how a special spin-lattice interaction in these iron-platinum thin films cancels out the thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. (2020-07-10)

Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives. (2020-07-09)

NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others
In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may withdraw some common words, like ''pig,'' ''tank,'' and ''door,'' much more often than others, including ''cat,'' ''street,'' and ''stair.'' By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encyclopedia pages, the researchers not only showed how our brains may recall words but also memories of our past experiences. (2020-06-29)

Older adults share fewer memories as they age
Researchers used a smartphone app to 'eavesdrop' on older adult conversations. They found that the older a person is, the less likely they are to share memories of past experiences. (2020-06-29)

'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain
Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain. (2020-06-25)

UTEP researchers uncover brain mechanisms in fruit flies that may impact future learning
A research team from The University of Texas at El Paso has made strides in understanding how memories are formed through the brain mechanisms of fruit flies. Their findings could enhance our understanding of brain disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and substance addiction. (2020-06-23)

Being 'mind-blind' may make remembering, dreaming and imagining harder, study finds
Aphantasia - being blind in the mind's eye - may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows. (2020-06-22)

A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)

A new study on rare 'split brain' patients sheds light on feature of human sleep
A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Study Lucca demonstrates for the first time that the slow waves of NREM-sleep travel and propagate in the brain through ''anatomical highways''. The scientists have investigated in particular the role of the corpus callosum, the bundle of nervous fibers that connects the two brain emispheres, by enrolling in the research a group of ''split brain'' patients. (2020-06-17)

FSU researchers uncover new insights into Alzheimer's disease
FSU researchers looking at mouse models found impaired functional interactions between the hippocampus and the parietal cortex during the memory replay period, which may yield new insights into Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-06-17)

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