Current Memories News and Events

Current Memories News and Events, Memories News Articles.
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A memory without a brain
Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified how the slime mold Physarum polycephalum saves memories - although it has no nervous system. (2021-02-23)

Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

How do our memories take shape?
Your brain is constantly evaluating which aspects of your experiences to either remember for later, ignore, or forget. Dartmouth researchers have developed a new approach for studying these aspects of memory, by creating a computer program that turns sequences of events from a video into unique geometric shapes, which can be compared to the shapes of how people recounted the events. Published in Nature Human Behavior, the study provides insight into how experiences are committed to memory and recounted to others. (2021-02-11)

How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer. Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Chemistry have now demonstrated that this is possible at room temperature: molecules of the metal-containing compound molybdenum acetate form an ordered structure on the insulator calcite without jumping to other positions or rotating. Their findings have been presented in the Nature Communications journal. (2021-02-04)

Forming sound memories: Autism gene plays key aspect in birdsong
Inactivating a gene in young songbirds that's closely linked with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevents the birds from forming memories necessary to accurately reproduce their fathers' songs, a new study led by UT Southwestern shows. (2021-02-03)

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers as newborns and remember them after up to 100 days apart--although they prefer unfamiliar mouse mothers as adults. (2021-01-26)

Memory fail controlled by dopamine circuit, study finds
Distraction can make you momentarily forget things. But how? Davis lab at Scripps Research, Florida uncovers a mechanism in fruit flies. (2021-01-21)

Researchers improve data readout by using 'quantum entanglement'
Researchers say they have been able to greatly improve the readout of data from digital memories - thanks to a phenomenon known as 'quantum entanglement'. (2021-01-20)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results confirmed the theory that positive emotions are mainly processed in the left half of the brain. (2021-01-13)

The changing paradigm of next-generation semiconductor memory development
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) has announced that the research team led by Dr. Kim Kyoung-Whan at the Center for Spintronics has proposed a new principle about spin memory devices, which are next-generation memory devices. This breakthrough presents new applicability that is different from the existing paradigm. (2021-01-12)

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that encodes timing of events
MIT neuroscientists shed new light on how the timing of a memory is encoded in the hippocampus, and suggest that time and space are encoded separately. (2021-01-11)

How can we help victims of torture?
Torture victims often reap less benefit from ordinary treatment. New insight might give new hope. (2021-01-06)

Researchers reveal how our brains know when something's different
NIH scientists discovered how a set of high frequency brain waves may help us unconsciously know when something's different by comparing memories of the past with present experiences. (2020-12-14)

How childhood brain function and memory skills shape each other
In early childhood, memory skills predict the strength of future brain connections, and conversely, the strength of early brain connections predict future memory acuity. New research published in JNeurosci highlights the complex, bidirectional relationship between brain function and ability during development. (2020-12-14)

Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that melatonin's metabolite AMK can enhance the formation of long-term memories in mice. Memory of objects were tested after treatment with melatonin or two of its metabolites. Older mice that normally performed poorly on the memory task showed improvements as dosage increased. The metabolite AMK was found to be the most important as melatonin failed to improve memory if it was blocked from metabolizing into AMK. (2020-12-10)

Energy-efficient magnetic RAM: A new building block for spintronic technologies
Researchers demonstrate a new way to enhance the energy efficiency of the non-volatile magnetic memory. (2020-12-10)

How neurons form long-term memories
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have identified genes that memory neurons use to rewire connections after new experiences. The findings shed light on the biology of long-term memory, with implications for future approaches to intervene when memory deficits occur with age or disease. (2020-12-09)

Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survival
Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their 'memories' to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects. (2020-12-01)

Neuroscientists measure fans' reactions to the big game
In a study published November 25 in the journal Neuron, researchers show how the feelings of surprise experienced while watching sports creates shifts in brain patterns. These shifts are important for neuroscientists to understand because they contribute to the formation of memories that are particularly strong. (2020-11-25)

Why experiences are better gifts for older children
What should we get for our kids this holiday? As children get older, giving them something they can experience (live through) instead of material things makes them happier, according to new research led by Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of marketing at the University of Illinois Chicago. (2020-11-24)

Stronger memories can help us make sense of future changes
Research from the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences in Arts & Sciences finds a new relationship between memory and the ability to incorporate changes into one's understanding of the world. (2020-11-24)

Memories of past events retain remarkable fidelity even as we age
Even though people tend to remember fewer details about past events as time goes by, the details they do remember are retained with remarkable fidelity, according to a new study. This finding holds true regardless of the age of the person or the amount of time that elapsed since the event took place. (2020-11-24)

Imaging method reveals a 'symphony of cellular activities'
MIT researchers have developed a way to simultaneously image up to five different molecules within a cell, by targeting glowing reporters to distinct locations inside the cell. This approach could allow scientists to learn much more about the complex signaling networks that control most cell functions. (2020-11-23)

Survey: Americans likely to attend large holiday gatherings despite COVID-19
A new national survey by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that although a majority of Americans plan to take precautions at holiday gatherings, such as social distancing and asking those with COVID symptoms not to attend, many will also put themselves at risk. Nearly two in five report they will likely attend a gathering with more than 10 people and a third will not ask guests to wear masks. (2020-11-12)

Using light to reprogramme the brain's GPS
Neuroscientists at UCL have used laser beams to ''switch on'' neurons in mice, providing new insight into the hidden workings of memory and showing how memories underpin the brain's inner GPS system. (2020-11-06)

Human intelligence just got less mysterious says Leicester neuroscientist
NEUROSCIENCE EXPERTS from the University of Leicester have released research that breaks with the past fifty years of neuroscientific opinion, arguing that the way we store memories is key to making human intelligence superior to that of animals. (2020-11-05)

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline
The happier we feel, the less likely we are to experience memory decline. (2020-10-29)

Remember that fake news you read? It may help you remember even more
Thinking back on a time you encountered false information or ''fake news'' may prime your brain to better recall truthful memories. (2020-10-16)

Astrocytes build synapses after cocaine use in mice
Drugs of abuse, like cocaine, are so addictive due in part to their cellular interaction, creating strong cellular memories in the brain that promote compulsive behaviors. A new study shows that cocaine use in mice leads to the formation of synapses by an unexpected architect: a type of cell called astrocytes. (2020-10-15)

Remembering novelty
The brain and its functions still pose many open questions. One of them is how exactly we form long-term memories about the environment. In a new study Ryuichi Shigemoto and his group from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) together with researchers from Aarhus University and the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan discovered a new signaling pathway in the hippocampus area of the brain that regulates how information about new environments is transferred into long-term memory. (2020-10-15)

Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. The findings have implications for our understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-07)

Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks - the excitatory and inhibitory networks. The excitatory neurons are involved in creating a memory trace, and the inhibitory neurons block out background noise and allow long-term learning to take place. (2020-10-07)

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. (2020-10-05)

Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
New brain research shows that writing by hand helps children learn more and remember better. At the same time, schools are going more and more digital, and a European survey shows that Norwegian children spend the most time online of 19 countries in the EU. (2020-10-01)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Scientists "scent train" honeybees to boost sunflowers' seed production
If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on September 17 have found that scent training honeybees might work in a similar way--and that this approach could make bees more efficient in pollinating crops. The findings show that honeybees given food scented with sunflower odors led to a significant increase in sunflower crop production. (2020-09-17)

Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. By studying both human and mouse brain activity, they report that this process happens in a region of the brain called the hippocampus. (2020-09-17)

The brain's memory abilities inspire AI experts in making neural networks less 'forgetful'
Artificial intelligence (AI) experts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Baylor College of Medicine report that they have successfully addressed what they call a ''major, long-standing obstacle to increasing AI capabilities'' by drawing inspiration from a human brain memory mechanism known as ''replay.'' (2020-09-17)

Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. (2020-09-08)

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