Current Menstrual Cycle News and Events

Current Menstrual Cycle News and Events, Menstrual Cycle News Articles.
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Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division
Many biological processes are subject to rhythmic changes. Well-known examples of this are the so-called circadian rhythm, an ''internal clock'' with a period of around 24 hours, or the shorter ultradian rhythm. Cell division is often linked to these rhythms. Biologists from Saarbrücken and Kaiserslautern have now found out that these rhythms and their coupling with cell division is closely related to hydrogen peroxide. The study was published in the renowned journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-02-16)

Stirring up conflicts in tumour cells
With two commercially available inhibitors, the cell cycle of the cancer cells in the childhood tumour neuroblastoma can be disrupted at a key point causing tumour cell death. (2021-02-11)

High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters
Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained. In a study published in Nature Communications, Umeå University researchers and collaborators quantify carbon emissions from rivers and lakes across Western Siberia, finding that emission are high and exceed carbon export to the Arctic Ocean. (2021-02-09)

Chemists developed a simplified method for pharmaceutical compounds synthesizing
A team of chemists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University developed a simple and efficient method to synthesize tetrahydroisoquinolines--important organic molecules for drug discovery. The method consists of just three steps. (2021-02-09)

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published in Scientific Reports, by Guillermo Jiménez-Pérez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza. (2021-02-09)

Understanding catalytic couplings: not all synergies are simple
Negishi cross-coupling reactions have been widely used to form C-C bonds since the 1970s and are often perceived as the result of two metals (i.e zinc and palladium/nickel) working in synergy. Researchers from the Martin group at ICIQ have delved into the Negishi cross-coupling of aryl esters using nickel catalysis to understand how this reaction works at the molecular level and how to improve it. The results have been published in Nature Catalysis. (2021-02-08)

Technion researchers discover new pathway for attacking cancer cells
The folate cycle is a process essential to DNA and RNA production. As a result, it is highly important to both cancer cells and healthy cells. Because DNA production is a critical stage in cell division, and thus in tumor growth, the folate cycle is a common target for chemotherapy. However, for the very same reason, there are significant side effects to attacking it. (2021-02-05)

Role of cell cycle on analyzing telomerase activity with a fluorescence off-on system
Traditional detecting techniques for telomerase activity are mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based classic telomeric repeat amplification protocols (TRAPs) and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). However, those methods were mainly relied on the analysis of asynchronous cells with different phases of cell cycle, the heterogeneous behavior of cell cycle were overlooked, which might affect the accuracy of their detection results. (2021-02-04)

Pregnant questions
Asking the right questions leads to a more accurate assessment of prenatal alcohol use in pregnant women. (2021-02-03)

1 in 10 college women experience period poverty, more likely to experience depression
New George Mason University study is first to examine unmet basic menstrual health needs, (often called 'period poverty') and associations with depression among college students. More than 14% of participants reported lack of access to menstrual products in the past year, and 10% reported period poverty every month. Women who experienced period poverty were more likely to report symptoms suggestive of moderate or severe depression. (2021-02-02)

Sea ice kept oxygen from reaching deep ocean during last ice age
Extensive sea ice covered the world's oceans during the last ice age, which prevented oxygen from penetrating into the deep ocean waters, complicating the relationship between oxygen and carbon. (2021-02-02)

Experts put new method of analysing children's play to the test
How to study the stages children go through as they play together has been highlighted in new research by a Swansea University academic. Dr Pete King, who specialises in play and childhood studies, devised a method of studying the process of children's play - the Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM) - and has now published research which demonstrates how effective it is as an observational tool. (2021-02-01)

Patient-reported outcomes from the randomized phase III CROWN study of first-line Lorlatinib versus in ALK+ NSCLC
Patient-reported outcomes from the phase III CROWN study showed that time to treatment deterioration (TTD) in pain in chest, dyspnea, and cough was comparable between those who received lorlatinib and patients who took crizotinib. The research was presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer Singapore. (2021-01-31)

In tune with the moon
Does the moon affect women's menstrual cycles? This question has been controversial for a long time. A new study by chronobiologists from Würzburg (Germany) now suggest that such an influence does exist. It's complicated, though. (2021-01-27)

Women's menstrual cycles temporarily synchronize with Moon cycles
An analysis of long-term menstrual cycle records kept by 22 women for up to 32 years shows that women with cycles lasting longer than 27 days intermittently synchronized with cycles that affect the intensity of moonlight and the moon's gravitational pull. This synchrony was lost as women aged and when they were exposed to artificial light at night. The (2021-01-27)

Biologists unravel full sequence of DNA repair mechanism
Researchers led by the University of Iowa have observed the entire sequence in break-induced replication, a method by which organisms from viruses to humans repair breaks in DNA that cannot be fixed otherwise but can introduce or cause genomic rearrangements and mutations contributing to cancer development. (2021-01-25)

Climate and carbon cycle trends of the past 50 million years reconciled
In a study published today in Science Advances, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa oceanographers fully reconciled climate and carbon cycle trends of the past 50 million years--solving a controversy debated in the scientific literature for decades. (2021-01-22)

Abusive bosses 'fake nice' instead of 'make nice'
Rather than take steps to genuinely repair damage caused by their abusive behavior, such as offering sincere apologies, many of the bosses in this study were more concerned about repairing their social images. (2021-01-22)

Common pesticides stop bees and flies from getting a good night's sleep
Just like us, many insects need a decent night's sleep to function properly, but this might not be possible if they have been exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides, the most common form of insecticide used worldwide, suggests research by academics at the University of Bristol. (2021-01-21)

Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. (2021-01-14)

The three days pregnancy sickness is most likely to start pinpointed
Researchers from the University of Warwick have narrowed the time frame that nausea and vomiting during pregnancy will potentially start to just three days for most women, opening up the possibility for scientists to identify a biological cause for the condition. (2021-01-12)

Can sodium-ion batteries replace trusty lithium-ion ones?
Sodium-ion batteries are a potential replacement for lithium batteries, but different anodes are needed for the same level of performance. Amorphous carbon is known to be a useful anode, because it has defects and voids that can be used to store sodium ions. Nitrogen/phosphorus-doped carbon also offers appealing electrical properties. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers describe how they applied basic physical concepts of atomic scale to build high-performance anodes for sodium-ion batteries. (2021-01-12)

Study reveals jellyfish create a 'virtual wall' to enhance performance
New discovery finds that Jellyfish create a ''ground effect,'' similar to how air squeezes between an airplane and ground during take-off, which builds pressure and a force that boosts performance. Never before has it been proven that an animal can create this phenomenon away from a solid boundary, let alone the open ocean. (2021-01-08)

Bacteria can tell the time
New research reveals that bacteria have internal clocks that align with the 24-hour cycle of life on Earth. (2021-01-08)

Identifying strategies to advance research on traumatic brain injury's effect on women
Analysis from a workshop convened by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in 2017 reveals gaps in and opportunities for research to improve understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in women. A new paper in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation summarizes and updates the findings presented during the 'Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury in Women' workshop and provides strategies for advancing research efforts in this area. NINDS is part of the National Institutes of Health. (2021-01-06)

Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals--including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds--follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology. (2020-12-11)

Promising treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, PMDD
The mental symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder improve following treatment with a progesterone receptor modulator, as demonstrated by SciLifeLab researcher Erika Comasco and Professor Inger Sundström-Poromaa, Uppsala University. The mechanism of action of the study drug provides insights into the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this psychiatric disorder and its treatment. (2020-12-10)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

New sunspot cycle could be one of the strongest on record, new research predicts
In direct contradiction to the official forecast, a team of scientists led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is predicting that the Sunspot Cycle that started this fall could be one of the strongest since record-keeping began. (2020-12-07)

'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR's unwanted changes problem
Turning off gene-editing until it reaches cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen offers a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes. (2020-12-04)

Detecting solar neutrinos with the Borexino experiment
A paper published in EPJ C by a team of authors including XueFeng Ding, Postdoc Associate of Physics at Princeton University, United States, documents the attempts of the Borexino experiment to measure low-energy neutrinos from the sun's carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle for the first time. (2020-12-04)

Simulations open a new way to reverse cell aging
Research findings by a KAIST team provide insight into the complex mechanism of cellular senescence and present a potential therapeutic strategy for reducing age-related diseases associated with the accumulation of senescent cells. (2020-11-30)

Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
Looking at a group of bacteria from soil, researchers at Northwestern University discovered that these organisms overcome limitation in their carbon processing machinery by rerouting their metabolic pathways to favor producing iron-scavenging compounds. (2020-11-30)

Sun model completely confirmed for the first time
The Borexino experiment research team has succeeded in detecting neutrinos from the sun's second fusion process, the Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen cycle (CNO cycle) for the first time. This means that all of the theoretical predictions on how energy is generated within the sun have now also been experimentally verified. The findings are the result of years of efforts devoted to bringing the background sources in the energy range of the CNO neutrinos under control. (2020-11-26)

Understanding the power of our Sun
For the first time, the international team was able to directly observe neutrinos from this cycle (CNO neutrinos) with the Borexino detector in the Laboratori Nazionali in the Gran Sasso Massif (Italy). This milestone represents the fulfilment of a long-cherished scientific dream for the Dresden neutrino researcher Prof Kai Zuber and his team at the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics. (2020-11-25)

Solar CNO neutrinos observed for the first time
Scientists who are members of the Borexino Collaboration have provided the first experimental proof of the occurrence of the so-called CNO cycle in the Sun: They have managed to directly detect the distinctive neutrinos generated during this fusion process. This is an important milestone on the route to better understanding the fusion processes that occur in the Sun. The Borexino Collaboration's findings have been published in the latest issue of the journal Nature. (2020-11-25)

Neutrinos yield first experimental evidence of catalyzed fusion dominant in many stars
An international team of about 100 scientists of the Borexino Collaboration, including particle physicist Andrea Pocar at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report in Nature this week detection of neutrinos from the sun, directly revealing for the first time that the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) fusion-cycle is at work in our sun. (2020-11-25)

A chemist from RUDN University synthesized analogs of natural toxins
A chemist from RUDN University suggested a simple and accurate method for the synthesis of analogs of two natural toxins, antofine and septicine. This universal approach can also be used to obtain other biologically active substances for medicinal chemistry. (2020-11-23)

Synthesis study demonstrates phytoplankton can bloom below Arctic sea ice
Researchers used historical scientific studies, along with contemporary observations employing autonomous floats and robotic vehicles, to demonstrate that phytoplankton blooms occur under Arctic Ocean sea ice. Previously, scientists had assumed that was impossible due to low-light conditions, particularly when ice cover was thicker before climate change. The synthesis of more than half a century of research on under-ice blooms suggests that modern computer models underestimate the contribution of microscopic algae to the Arctic carbon cycle. (2020-11-19)

Surrey reveals simple method to produce high performing Lithium Selenium batteries
Engineers at the University of Surrey have developed a simple and elegant method of producing high-powered lithium-selenium (Li-Se) batteries. (2020-11-16)

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