Current Mental Health News and Events

Current Mental Health News and Events, Mental Health News Articles.
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Street trees close to the home may reduce the risk of depression
Daily contact with trees in the street may reduce the need for antidepressants. This is the result of a study by researchers at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Leipzig University, recently published in Scientific Reports. Street tree planting in cities may be a nature-based solution in urban planning to reduce the risk of depression, also addressing climate change and biodiversity loss. (2021-01-25)

Study: Negative mental health effects of pandemic lockdowns spike, then fade
Social distancing policies correlated with immediate increases in interest in information about 'isolation' and 'worry' - but those effects tapered off two to four weeks after their respective peaks, says new research co-written by Dolores AlbarracĂ­n, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad (pictured), an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois. (2021-01-25)

The stark health and well-being impacts of 'cocooning' on older people
Findings of a new study published by researchers from Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital outline the health impacts faced by older people while cocooning during the Covid-19 pandemic. The findings are published in the Quarterly Journal of Medicine here: https://bit.ly/3qGKJoI. (2021-01-25)

Covid lockdown loneliness linked to more depressive symptoms in older adults
Loneliness in adults aged 50 and over during the COVID-19 lockdown was linked to worsening depressive and other mental health symptoms, according to a large-scale online study. (2021-01-22)

Screening tool may help diagnose mental disorders in early pregnancy
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that questions typically asked to new mothers to screen for depression after giving birth can also help to detect depressive symptoms and other mental disorders during early pregnancy. (2021-01-21)

RUDN University neurosurgeon created a method to collect mental activity data of software developers
A neurosurgeon from RUDN University studied the mental activity of developers at work. In his novel method, he combined mobile EEG devices and software that analyzes neurophysiological data. (2021-01-21)

Embedded counseling services can improve accessibility for students, MU study finds
Kerry Karaffa is the first MU Counseling Center psychologist to be embedded specifically within the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, where he provides tailored counseling services for professional students training to become veterinarians. (2021-01-21)

Survey: Frequent reports of missed medical care in US adults during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic
Two out of five individuals delayed or missed medical care in the early phase of the pandemic--from March through mid-July 2020. (2021-01-21)

Age provides a buffer to pandemic's mental health impact, University of Connecticut researchers say
Older adults are managing the stress of the coronavirus pandemic better than younger adults, reporting less depression and anxiety despite also experiencing greater general concern about COVID-19, according to a study recently published by researchers at the UConn School of Nursing. (2021-01-20)

Mental health conditions alarmingly high among children with autism
Nearly 78 per cent of children with autism have at least one mental health condition and nearly half have more than that. Mental health conditions were present in 44.8 per cent of pre-school age children with autism--a group among which prevalence had not previously been established using a large, population-based sample. Only 14.1 per cent of children without autism (ages 3-17) had mental health conditions. (2021-01-19)

Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

New study shows correlation between teen obesity and mental health issues
Half of all young people treated for severe obesity have neuropsychiatric problems, according to a new study by researchers from Lund University and Gothenburg, Sweden, among others. Two thirds of the teens suffered from some type of mental health problem, as reported by themselves or their parents. (2021-01-19)

Drinking during COVID-19 up among people with anxiety and depression
People with anxiety and depression are more likely to report an increase in drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic than those without mental health issues, according to a new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health. (2021-01-19)

Loneliness hits young people harder during lockdown
People under 30 and people with a history of mental illness experience the highest levels of loneliness and anxiety during COVID-19 lockdown. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and their international collaborators investigate how mental health is affected by the pandemic across Europe. (2021-01-19)

Many parents say teens with anxiety, depression may benefit from peer confidants at school
Three-quarters of parents in a new national poll think peers better understand teen challenges, compared to teachers or counselors in the school. (2021-01-18)

Discrimination may increase risk of anxiety disorders regardless of genetics, study finds
Exposure to discrimination plays a significant role in the risk of developing anxiety and related disorders, even - in a first - after accounting for potential genetic risks, according to a multidisciplinary team of health researchers led by Tufts University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2021-01-14)

Common workplace interactions can trigger suicidal thoughts for employees with mood disorders
Perceived low-grade forms of workplace mistreatment, such as avoiding eye contact or excluding a coworker from conversation, can amplify suicidal thoughts in employees with mood disorders, based on a West Virginia University study. (2021-01-14)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

Workaholism leads to mental and physical health problems
Workaholism or work addiction risk is a growing public health concern that can lead to many negative mental and physical health outcomes such as depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may become a major cause of employees' work addiction. The international group of researchers including the HSE University scientist explored the link between work addiction risk and health-related outcomes using the framework of Job Demand Control Model. (2021-01-13)

High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood. (2021-01-13)

What are the links between violence and mental illness? Update from Harvard Review of Psychiatry
When there is news of a violent attack, we sometimes hear that it could be related to mental illness - which may make us ask whether the violence could have been predicted or prevented. Current research and perspectives on associations between violence and mental illness are presented in the special January/February issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-13)

Study gauges psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on university students
More than half of all university students in the United States have experienced high levels of psychological impact from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Browning of Clemson University, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

Food insufficiency linked to depression, anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found a 25% increase in food insufficiency during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insufficiency, the most extreme form of food insecurity, occurs when families do not have enough food to eat. Among the nationally representative sample of 63,674 adults in the US, Black and Latino Americans had over twice the risk of food insufficiency compared to White Americans. (2021-01-12)

Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
A study from Arizona State University's REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers. (2021-01-12)

More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. The researchers found that the risk of these mental health conditions was comparable to rates observed during natural disasters, such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. (2021-01-12)

U.S. mental health system needs broad changes to improve access and quality
The U.S. mental health system for decades has faced challenges such as the underdevelopment of community-based supports, high levels of unmet need and inequities in care. A new comprehensive analysis outlines the building blocks needed to bring about transformative change to the system, including integrating behavioral health care into general health care settings, providing supportive housing to the homeless and promoting comprehensive mental health education. (2021-01-11)

Mindfulness can improve mental health and wellbeing -- but unlikely to work for everyone
Mindfulness courses can reduce anxiety, depression and stress and increase mental wellbeing within most but not all non-clinical settings, say a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. They also found that mindfulness may be no better than other practices aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing. (2021-01-11)

COVID forced psychiatric care online. Many patients want it to stay there, study finds
A new study suggests that more than half of outpatient psychiatry patients whose appointments were suddenly converted to video or phone interactions by the pandemic will want to keep going with virtual mental health care even after the pandemic subsides. The convenience of seeing a provider without leaving home, and avoiding potential exposure to the coronavirus, factor heavily into this preference. So does a patient's initial experience with seeing a provider virtually. (2021-01-08)

How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic. (2021-01-07)

Heading outdoors keeps lockdown blues at bay
A new study has found that spending time outdoors and switching off devices, such as smartphones, is associated with higher levels of happiness during a period of COVID-19 restrictions. (2021-01-07)

Mental health of UK women, ethnic minorities especially affected during pandemic
In the UK, men from ethnic minorities and women may have experienced worse mental health declines than White British men, according to a study published January 6, 2021 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Eugenio Proto and Climent Quintana-Domeque of institutions including the University of Glasgow and the University of Exeter, UK. (2021-01-06)

Focusing on diversion yields positive results for kids with behavioral issues
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found that focusing on diversion--instead of detention--yields positive results for youth with behavioral health issues (2021-01-04)

New studies suggest vaping could cloud your thoughts
Both adults and kids who vape were more likely to report difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions than their non-vaping, non-smoking peers on two annual national surveys. Survey results, which were analyzed by a team of URMC researchers, also suggest that kids were more likely to experience mental fog if they started vaping before the age of 14. (2020-12-28)

One psychedelic experience may lessen trauma of racial injustice
A single positive experience on a psychedelic drug may help reduce stress, depression and anxiety symptoms in Black, Indigenous and people of color whose encounters with racism have had lasting harm, a new study suggests. (2020-12-28)

Children's emotion inferences from masked faces during the COVID-19 pandemic
Children struggle to discern emotions for mask-wearing faces, though masks are ''unlikely to dramatically impair'' their everyday interactions. (2020-12-23)

One in four women with ADHD has attempted suicide
Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) can have negative consequences on mental health into adulthood. A nationally representative Canadian study reported that the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts was much higher for women who had ADHD (24%) compared to women who had not (3%). Men with ADHD were also more likely to have attempted suicide compared to men without ADHD (9% vs. 2%). (2020-12-22)

Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
University of Ottawa global meta-analysis finds significant mental-health consequences for population, but especially healthcare workers. (2020-12-17)

Just what the doctor ordered: Mental health and wellness apps
Kaiser Permanente physicians and therapists now have the ability to refer their patients to evidenced-based mental health and wellness apps through the organization's electronic health record system. With a simple referral to an app, Kaiser Permanente patients can begin using it on their own or under the guidance of a clinician -- at no cost. (2020-12-16)

COVID-19 turned parents into proxy educators; new research examines the stress it caused
When the emerging COVID-19 pandemic caused most U.S. schools to close and transition to distance learning last spring, many parents were forced into new roles as proxy educators for their children. A study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, finds that roughly 51 percent of all parents surveyed in March and April had at least one child struggling with distance learning and were themselves experiencing significantly higher levels of stress. (2020-12-16)

New insights into Fragile X syndrome and the fetal brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have revealed further insight into the fetal development of our brain and the potential causes of Fragile X syndrome (FSX). (2020-12-16)

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