Current Mental Illness News and Events

Current Mental Illness News and Events, Mental Illness News Articles.
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For students of color, online racism leads to real-world mental health challenges
For college students of color who encounter online racism, the effect of racialized aggressions and assaults reaches far beyond any single social media feed and can lead to real and significant mental health impacts - even more significant than in-person experiences of racial discrimination, according to a recently published study from researchers at UConn and Boston College. (2021-02-23)

College students displaced from campus due to COVID-19 show worse psychological outcomes
In a new study of 791 undergraduate and graduate students, surveyed between April 9 and August 4, 2020, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston University's School of Social Work, and McLean Hospital revealed that students forced to relocate during the spring were more likely to report COVID-19-related grief, loneliness and generalized anxiety symptoms than students who did not relocate. (2021-02-23)

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students
New nationwide survey data uncovers college students' current mental health challenges and needs. (2021-02-19)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

Physical conditions linked to psychological distress in patients with cancer
Among patients with cancer, having additional physical comorbidities was linked with a higher risk of experiencing psychological distress. The finding comes from a Psycho-Oncology analysis of 2017 data from the National Health Survey of Spain. (2021-02-18)

First report on mass shootings from Columbia University database
A study by researchers at Columbia University's Center of Prevention and Evaluation finds that most mass murders are not committed by individuals with serious mental illness. (2021-02-18)

Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who regularly play video games at age 11 are less likely to develop depressive symptoms three years later, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. (2021-02-18)

Mentally ill kids become less healthy adults
A new pair of studies from a Duke research team's long-term work in New Zealand make the case that early-life mental health problems can lead to physical diseases and advanced aging in adulthood. But because mental health conditions can appear early in life, the researchers say that investment in prompt mental health care could be used to prevent later diseases and reduce healthcare costs. (2021-02-17)

Psychotherapy for panic disorder shows positive long-term effects
Psychotherapy for panic disorder produces good results, and the effects are lasting. That is the result from a large long-term study from Lund University in Sweden. Two years after treatment were 70 per cent of the patients clearly improved and 45 per cent were remitted. (2021-02-16)

Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - according to a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University of London. (2021-02-16)

- How we sleep and experience psychological symptoms during pandemic
A study shows that during the first confinement, day-to-day variations in subjective sleep quality influenced the occurrence of mental and physical health complaints, and that these effects were linked to daily reports of COVID-19 related deaths. The team of researchers led by Peter Simor interviewed 166 participants in three European countries, twice a day for two consecutive weeks via an online interface about their sleep quality and negative psychological experiences. (2021-02-11)

Study: Facing heat illness, dehydration risks, marching bands need access to athletic trainers
A KU study measured marching band members' core temperatures, fluid intake and behaviors through high-tech methods to determine their risks of heat illness. Findings showed band members are just as at risk as athletes, yet seldom have access to health experts or policies to protect them. (2021-02-11)

Patient education program with mental health component reduces cardiovascular disease risks
People who participated in an integrated mental and physical health patient education program maintained significant improvements on seven of nine health measures six months after the program's conclusion. Study by University of Illinois social work professor Tara M. Powell and Jordan's Royal Health Awareness Society. (2021-02-11)

Researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability
Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. (2021-02-11)

How research on chronic illnesses will improve COVID-19 treatment
A new paper in Oxford Open Immunology, published by Oxford University Press, examines prior findings in the field of neuroimmunology that suggest potential treatment strategies for patients suffering long-term symptoms from COVID-19. (2021-02-10)

Sleep keeps teens on track for good mental health
As families settle back into a new school year, sleep experts at the University of South Australia are reminding parents about the importance of teenagers getting enough sleep, cautioning them that insufficient sleep can negatively affect their mental health. (2021-02-10)

Digital providers come to the fore to support global mental health during pandemic
Research published today shows how digital providers are coming together to support the mental health needs of millions of users unable to access traditional services during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time ever, digital providers and experts from over 20 countries have gathered a staggering number of insights about mental health during the pandemic from potentially upwards of 50 million users worldwide. (2021-02-10)

COVID-related depression linked to reduced physical activity
New research from Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh and University of California, San Diego found that 61% of surveyed university students were at risk of clinical depression, a value twice the rate prior to the pandemic. This rise in depression came alongside dramatic shifts in lifestyle habits. (2021-02-10)

Traumatic stress in childhood can lead to brain changes in adulthood: study
A new study has shown that traumatic or stressful events in childhood may lead to tiny changes in key brain structures that can now be identified decades later. The study is the first to show that trauma or maltreatment during a child's early years--a well-known risk factor for developing mental health conditions such as major depressive disorder in adulthood--triggers changes in specific subregions of the amygdala and the hippocampus. (2021-02-09)

Poorer mental health smolders after deadly, devastating wildfire
UC San Diego researchers report that climate change is a chronic mental health stressor, and promotes a variety of mental health problems. The 2018 Camp Fire is a case study. (2021-02-09)

Racism and anti-gay discrimination heighten risk for arrest and incarceration
New research by Morgan Philbin, PhD, at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues looks at why Black young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately subject to high rates of arrest and incarceration. They find that perceived racial discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, and HIV-status discrimination are all associated with risk for criminal justice involvement in this population. (2021-02-09)

Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2021-02-08)

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts
A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts - readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells - may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses. Findings from the study, conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, appear in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. (2021-02-08)

10-year study shows elevated suicide risk from excess social media time for teen girls
In the longest study to date on the effects of social media on teens, BYU research found a correlation between time spent on social media and suicidality risk among teenage girls. (2021-02-08)

Happy childhood? That's no guarantee for good mental health
It's well understood that a difficult childhood can increase the likelihood of mental illness, but according to new research from the University of South Australia, a happy and secure childhood does not always protect a child from developing a mental illness later in life. (2021-02-07)

Help for borderline personality disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder, or BPD, is the most common personality disorder in Australia, affecting up to 5% of the population at some stage, and Flinders University researchers warn more needs to be done to meet this high consumer needs. A new study in the Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Wiley) describes how people with BPD are becoming more knowledgeable about the disorder and available treatments, but may find it difficult to find evidence-based help for their symptoms. (2021-02-04)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from UmeƄ University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Maternal mental health needs attention during COVID-19 lockdowns
Mothers are at increased risk of mental health problems as they struggle to balance the demands of childcare and remote working in COVID-19 lockdowns, according to new research from an international team of researchers. (2021-02-03)

Story of COVID's mental health impact - a thread
Data scientists have analysed 94 million tweets from the first months of the pandemic to track COVID-19's effect on mental health in NSW. (2021-02-03)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

Why do psychiatric drugs help some, but not others? Study offers clues
New University of Colorado Boulder research shows that a key protein in the brain called AKT may function differently in males than females. The study also offers a closer look at where, precisely, in the brain things may go wrong with it, marking an important step toward more targeted and less harmful therapies. (2021-02-01)

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation
Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work represents a major step forward in achieving new therapies for a whole host of neurological and mental disorders. (2021-02-01)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals. (2021-01-28)

Link between dual sensory loss and depression
People with combined vision and hearing loss are nearly four times more likely to experience depression and more than three times more likely to suffer chronic anxiety, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology and led by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). (2021-01-28)

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that existing drugs commonly used for other disorders might be modified to help treat individual symptoms of multiple disorders. (2021-01-28)

Genomic studies implicate specific genes in post-traumatic stress disorder
After analyzing the genomes of more 250,000 military veterans, researchers have identified 18 specific, fixed positions on chromosomes that appear associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. The findings may point to new therapeutic drug targets. (2021-01-28)

Schizophrenia second only to age as greatest risk factor for COVID-19 death
People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows. Their higher risk, the investigators say, cannot be explained by other factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, and smoking. (2021-01-27)

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