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Current Mental Health News and Events, Mental Health News Articles.
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How to treat depression in prison -- and why it matters
Of the 4 million prisoners released each year, 23 percent have suffered from major depressive disorder. (2019-02-21)
Troubling extent of trauma and PTSD in British young people revealed
New research from King's College London suggests one in 13 young people in the UK have had post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) before reaching age 18. (2019-02-21)
Light at the end of the tunnel
A new nationally representative study reports that approximately two-thirds (69 percent) of Canadians who had ever attempted suicide were completely free of any suicidal thoughts in the past year. (2019-02-20)
Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia
Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the February 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-02-20)
The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms. (2019-02-14)
New molecules reverse memory loss linked to depression, aging
New therapeutic molecules developed at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging. (2019-02-14)
How common are mental health disorders, treatment in children?
An estimated 7.7 million children in the United States (16.5 percent) have at least one mental health disorder and about half didn't receive treatment from a mental health professional. (2019-02-11)
Working it out: Researchers find exercise may help fight depression in seniors
The benefits of exercise are widely known but kinesiologists at McMaster University have for the first time found that physical activity may help fight depression in seniors by stimulating muscle-generated mood boosters. (2019-02-07)
Workplace sexism's effects on women's mental health and job satisfaction
A new Journal of Applied Social Psychology study investigates the associations between workplace sexism, sense of belonging at work, mental health, and job satisfaction for women in male-dominated industries. (2019-02-06)
Climate change poses greater risk of mental health challenges for children born to depressed mothers
Climate change poses an exponentially greater risk for mental health problems in children born to mothers with prenatal depression who also experience natural disaster-related stress. (2019-02-06)
Mental illness not to blame for gun violence study finds
Counter to a lot of public opinion, having a mental illness does not necessarily make a person more likely to commit gun violence. (2019-02-06)
Healthy diet can ease symptoms of depression
An analysis of data from almost 46,000 people has found that weight loss, nutrient boosting and fat reduction diets can all reduce the symptoms of depression. (2019-02-05)
Origins of depression brought into focus in large-scale genetic study
Hundreds of genes have been newly linked to depression, shedding light on the origins of the condition and highlighting personality types that could be at risk. (2019-02-05)
Fruit and vegetables may be important for mental as well as physical well-being
Researchers at the universities of Leeds and York analysed data from more than 40,000 people in the UK, and found that changes in fruit and vegetable consumption are correlated with changes in mental well-being. (2019-02-05)
Blacks with high socioeconomic status less likely to seek mental health care
In her latest research paper Sirry Alang questions why there is a significant unmet need for mental health care among Blacks and identifies solutions among healthcare systems to fix it: teach the history of racism in medicine; and actively seek, privilege and legitimize the narratives of black people. (2019-02-05)
A gut feeling for mental health
The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. (2019-02-04)
Suicide can't be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts, major Australian study shows
A major Australian study from UNSW Sydney shows that most people who died of suicide dismissed expressing suicidal thoughts to health professionals, prompting calls to review the way treatment is managed and resourced. (2019-02-01)
New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression
In a new study, researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project demonstrate that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity. (2019-01-31)
A correlation found between psychiatric disorders and events during the prenatal stag
Particular genetic variants in the human genome that are important for the development of the brain early in the life of the foetus are frequently found in psychiatric disorders. (2019-01-31)
Mental health disorders common following mild head injury
A new study reveals that approximately 1 in 5 individuals may experience mental health symptoms up to six months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), suggesting the importance of follow-up care for these patients. (2019-01-30)
Females find social interactions to be more rewarding than males, study reveals
Females find same-sex social interactions to be more rewarding than males, and females are more sensitive to the rewarding actions of oxytocin than males, according to a research study led by Georgia State University on the brain mechanisms that determine the rewarding properties of social interactions. (2019-01-30)
Long-term unemployment linked to increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome
Babies born after being exposed to opioids before birth are more likely to be delivered in regions of the US with high rates of long-term unemployment and lower levels of mental health services, according to a study from researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the RAND Corporation. (2019-01-29)
Care following opioid overdoses in West Virginia falls short
Only a small fraction of people who had non-fatal opioid overdoses in West Virginia received treatment in the aftermath, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. (2019-01-29)
Common test for mental health understanding is biased
The National Institute for Mental Health recommends a test, called the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET), for assessing a person's mental health understanding--that is a patient's ability to understanding what other people are thinking and feeling. (2019-01-28)
Are tattoos linked with individuals' health and risky behaviors?
In a survey-based study published in the International Journal of Dermatology, having tattoos was not significantly related to overall health status, but individuals with tattoos were more likely to be diagnosed with a mental health issue and to report sleep problems. (2019-01-24)
Positive well-being may protect against depression in people with autism
In an Autism Research study of 36 newly employed adults with autism spectrum disorder who were participating in a supported employment program, positive well-being -- or a sense of happiness and life satisfaction -- was associated with a lower risk of developing depression over 12 months of follow-up. (2019-01-24)
Suicide deaths among incarcerated youth
According to a US Department of Justice survey, from 2000 to 2014, suicide rates were two to three times higher for youth in custody than those in the general population. (2019-01-23)
Emergency caesareans put new mothers at higher risk of developing postnatal depression
A major study, from the University of York, provides new evidence that emergency C-sections put new mothers at greater risk of experiencing mental health problems after giving birth. (2019-01-23)
Childhood lead exposure linked to poor adult mental health
Lead exposure in childhood appears to have long-lasting negative effects on mental health and personality in adulthood, according to a study of people who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline. (2019-01-23)
Association of childhood lead exposure with adult personality traits, mental health
Millions of adults now entering middle age were exposed to high levels of lead as children, with childhood lead exposure linked to lower IQ, greater rates of child behavior problems, hyperactivity and antisocial behavior. (2019-01-23)
Parents' mental health problems increase risk of reactive attachment disorder in children
Children's risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) increases if parents are diagnosed with any type of mental health disorder, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku, Finland. (2019-01-22)
Researchers map out the relationship between mental disorders
Based on register data from 5.9 million people living in Denmark from 2000 to 2016, the study is the most detailed study of comorbidity ever conducted in the field of mental health. (2019-01-17)
The cerebellum's hidden roles in social and reward-driven behavior
The cerebellum may regulate sociability and reward-driven behavior by controlling the release of dopamine, according to a new study. (2019-01-17)
Fighting perinatal mood and anxiety disorders on multiple levels
An award-winning poster that Lenore Jarvis, M.D., MEd, and colleagues presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Convention and Exhibit in Orlando, Florida, details Children's integrated approach to help women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders which includes actions at individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and policy levels. (2019-01-16)
Schizophrenia linked to genetic structural abnormality in adolescent brain
Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. (2019-01-16)
Risk for developing more than one mental health disorder revealed
A new study has revealed the risks behind developing a seconds mental health disorder after an initial diagnosis in the largest and most comprehensive study of comorbidity to date. (2019-01-16)
Advances in the study of drugs to combat cognitive impairment in schizophrenia
A study by the UPV/EHU has assessed the effectiveness of various drugs, which are used to delay cognitive deterioration in patients with Alzheimer's, in improving cognitive impairment displayed by patients with schizophrenia. (2019-01-15)
Military spouses face higher perinatal depression risk
Women whose partners are away on military deployment are at greater risk of developing mental illness during the perinatal period, according to a review paper published in the Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. (2019-01-14)
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling positive events and experiences can help young people build resilience against depression in later life, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2019-01-14)
Technology use explains at most 0.4 percent of adolescent wellbeing, new study finds
Study finds only 0.4 percent of wellbeing in adolescents is associated with technology use. (2019-01-14)
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