Current Metabolic Syndrome News and Events

Current Metabolic Syndrome News and Events, Metabolic Syndrome News Articles.
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How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this is the first time it has been used to study the perception of satiety (2021-02-22)

Cancer control: Non-DNA changes induce metabolism variations in hepatocellular carcinomas
Mechanisms underlying metabolic variations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a fast growing and invasive cancer, remain unclear. Now, researchers from Fudan University, China identified signatures of ''m6A,'' the most abundant ''post-transcriptional RNA modification,'' that segregate HCC into sub-types with distinct metabolic characteristics. They have also developed a novel m6A score that can quantify such modifications and aid risk assessment, prediction of prognosis, and response to treatment in patients with HCC. (2021-02-22)

CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C
In a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) describe the array of rashes seen in MIS-C patients at their hospital through late July 2020, providing photos and information that could help doctors diagnose future cases. (2021-02-22)

International study finds increased COVID-19 mortality among adults with Down syndrome
A new study by an international team of researchers found that adults with Down syndrome are more likely to die from COVID-19 than the general population, supporting the need to prioritize vaccinating people with the genetic disorder. (2021-02-22)

Metabolic mutations help bacteria resist drug treatment
MIT researchers have identified a new class of mutations that help bacteria develop antibiotic resistance. In a study of E. coli, they discovered that mutations to genes involved in metabolism can help bacteria to evade the toxic effects of several different antibiotics. (2021-02-18)

Study demonstrates the reasons to screen children with cancer for inherited cancer genes
Experts at MSK Kids, the pediatric oncology program at MSK, have found that inherited cancer genes are more common than expected in children with cancer. (2021-02-16)

Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division
Many biological processes are subject to rhythmic changes. Well-known examples of this are the so-called circadian rhythm, an ''internal clock'' with a period of around 24 hours, or the shorter ultradian rhythm. Cell division is often linked to these rhythms. Biologists from Saarbr├╝cken and Kaiserslautern have now found out that these rhythms and their coupling with cell division is closely related to hydrogen peroxide. The study was published in the renowned journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-02-16)

Researchers identify muscle factor that controls fat metabolism
In a recent study, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers have found that skeletal muscle significantly affects how the body stores and metabolizes fat. (2021-02-15)

Hope for children with bow hunter syndrome
DALLAS - Feb. 11, 2021 - Fusing the neck's top two vertebrae can prevent repeat strokes in children with bow hunter syndrome, a rare condition that affects a handful of U.S. pediatric patients each year, UT Southwestern researchers suggest in a recent study. The finding, published online in Child's Nervous System, offers a new way to treat these children and protect them from potentially lifelong neurological consequences. (2021-02-11)

Tuning the circadian clock, boosting rhythms may be key to future treatments and medicines
Subconsciously, our bodies keep time for us through an ancient means - the circadian clock. A new University of California, Irvine-led article reviews how the clock controls various aspects of homeostasis, and how organs coordinate their function over the course of a day. (2021-02-11)

How research on chronic illnesses will improve COVID-19 treatment
A new paper in Oxford Open Immunology, published by Oxford University Press, examines prior findings in the field of neuroimmunology that suggest potential treatment strategies for patients suffering long-term symptoms from COVID-19. (2021-02-10)

Male sex, BMI, smoking and depression all increase biological age
A 'biological age' score predicts that being male, overweight, a smoker and having depression all contribute to biological aging, a study published today in eLife reports. (2021-02-09)

Early study points to potential therapeutic avenue for a pair of rare pediatric diseases
Scientists have devised a new approach for detecting and potentially heading off the effects of two rare pediatric diseases before birth. The study, performed in mouse models of the diseases and published today in Cell Reports, represents an important step toward much-needed early interventions for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome. (2021-02-09)

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2. TMPRSS2, a gene that codes for an enzyme critical for aiding the entry of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells, had 60% higher levels of expression in Down syndrome. The researchers also found higher expression levels for CXCL10, a gene that can trigger cytokine storms. The authors call to vaccinate people with Down syndrome against COVID-19 as a priority. (2021-02-08)

Nehandertals' gut microbiota and the bacteria helping our health
Through the study of ancient DNA from 50,000-year-old Neanderthal faecal sediments, an international research group isolated a group of micro-organisms whose characteristics are similar to those of modern Sapiens: such findings can be instrumental to the protection of our gut microbiota (2021-02-05)

Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats
Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big implications for deciding how to safeguard bat populations. (2021-02-04)

International research network identifies triggers for severe course of liver cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. In ACLF the progressive loss of function of the scarred liver can no longer be compensated (acute decompensation). As a result, other organs such as the kidney or brain fail. The triggers for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis and an ACLF are most frequently bacterial infections, liver inflammation caused by alcohol, or a combination of both factors. (2021-02-02)

Stress on every cell:
Uncovering the activities of the organs, tissues and cells responsible for the body's stress response as they've never before been seen revealed new cells and possible new drug targets (2021-02-01)

New technique identifies important mutations behind Lynch Syndrome
A Michigan Medicine team describes a method for screening so-called genetic variants of uncertain significance in the hopes of identifying those mutations that could cause cancer. (2021-01-29)

First hybrid gene therapy shows early promise in treating long QT syndrome
In a new study published in Circulation, Mayo Clinic researchers provide the first preclinical, proof-of-concept study for hybrid gene therapy in long QT syndrome, a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. (2021-01-28)

Osteoporosis, controversial fractures and various bone markers
Aging and lifestyle-related metabolic imbalances cause the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). A team of doctors from Shinshu University School of Medicine compared the impacts of AGEs on bone status and prevalent osteoporotic fractures in a cohort of postmenopausal women. They hope to provide an effective intervention for the AGEs accumulation in bone tissue leading to bone health retention in the elderly. (2021-01-28)

Rare genetic syndrome identified, caused by mutations in gene SATB1
Variations in the gene SATB1 have been shown to cause a rare genetic syndrome. Different variations across the gene lead to varied effects on the cell, leading to a difference in the severity of neurodevelopmental disorders. Discovery of this genetic syndrome is hoped to provide information to families and individuals affected by SATB1-syndrome. (2021-01-28)

Nixing bone cancer fuel supply offers new treatment approach, mouse study suggests
An innovative approach to treating bone tumors - starving cancer cells of the energy they need to grow - could one day provide an alternative to a commonly used chemotherapy drug without the risk of severe side effects, suggests a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2021-01-26)

The longevity gene mammalian Indy (mINDY) is involved in blood pressure regulation
Reduced expression of mINDY, which is known to extend life span in lower organisms and to prevent from diet induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance in mice, has now been shown to lower blood pressure and heart rate in rodents. (2021-01-26)

Aging-US: PAM (PIK3/AKT/mTOR) signaling in glia: potential contributions to brain tumors
'The consideration of aberrant PIK3/AKT/mTOR signaling in glia during aging elucidates several therapeutic opportunities for brain tumors'. (2021-01-25)

When -- not what -- obese mice ate reduced breast cancer risk
University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers report that intermittent fasting reduced breast cancer risk in obese mice. (2021-01-25)

A world first in circadian clock manipulation
A new method developed by Nagoya University and Groningen University scientists allows for reversible manipulation of the circadian clock period using a light-activated switch. Compounds which act on clock proteins were identified through large-scale chemical screening, and modified to include a light-activated switch, which was further modified to react to non-harmful visible light, creating a non-toxic and fully reversible circadian clock control process. (2021-01-24)

The interconnection of global pandemics -- Obesity, impaired metabolic health and COVID-19
In a Nature Reviews Endocrinology article authors from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) highlight the interconnection of #obesity and impaired metabolic health with the severity of #COVID19. #diabetes (2021-01-21)

Vegan diet significantly remodels metabolism in young children
University of Helsinki researchers report a comprehensive pilot study on the metabolic effects of full vegan diet on young children. The study found vegan children to have remarkably altered metabolism and lower vitamin A and D status compared to children with no special diet. (2021-01-21)

Gastrointestinal surgery can be a cure for type 2 diabetes finds new long-term study
The results of a randomised clinical trial with the longest follow up to date show that metabolic surgery is more effective than medications and lifestyle interventions in the long-term control of severe type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-21)

Diabetes powerfully associated with premature coronary heart disease in women
To understand what factors put younger individuals at higher risk of premature coronary heart disease, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Mayo Clinic analyzed more than 50 risk factors in 28,024 women who participated in the decades-long Women's Health Study. Notably, women under 55 with type-2 diabetes had a tenfold greater risk of having CHD over the next two decades, with lipoprotein insulin resistance proving to be a strong, predictive biomarker as well. (2021-01-20)

Type 2 Diabetes: New Evidence Underlines the Role of Obesity in Late Complications
Successful weight loss is considered to be an integral part of the therapy for type 2 diabetes. New data from a large-scale observational study carried out at German Institute of Human Nutrition in cooperation with the German Center for Diabetes Research support the current recommendations of physicians. The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, suggest that obesity and weight gain can lead to vascular disorders, the leading cause of disease and death for people with type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-20)

Single-cell test can reveal precisely how drugs kill cancer cells
Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a method named D2O-probed CANcer Susceptibility Test Ramanometry (D2O-CANST-R) to see, at single-cell/organelle level, how pharmaceuticals induce cancer cell death and how cancer cells adapt. (2021-01-19)

How dietary choice influences lifespan in fruit flies
Having a choice of foods may accelerate aging and shorten the lifespan of fruit flies, according to a study published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2021-01-19)

Moffitt researchers identify how cancer cells adapt to survive harsh tumor microenvironments
To better understand the conditions that select for the Warburg Effect and the mechanisms where cells can express this metabolic adaptation, Moffitt researchers subjected nonmalignant cells to the harsh tumor microenvironment that is present during early carcinogenesis, known as ductal carcinoma in situ. In a new research article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Moffitt team shows that these conditions select for cells to express a Warburg Effect. (2021-01-19)

BIO Integration journal, Volume 1, Issue number 4, publishes
BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 4, Publishes Guangzhou, January 15, 2021: New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) publishes its fourth issue, volume 1, issue 4. (2021-01-15)

Physical frailty syndrome: a cacophony of multisystem dysfunction
Aging experts synthesize converging evidence that the aging-related pathophysiology underpinning the clinical presentation of phenotypic frailty is a state of lower functioning due to severe dysregulation of the complex dynamics in our bodies that maintains health and resilience. When severity passes a threshold, the clinical syndrome and its phenotype are diagnosable. This paper summarizes evidence meeting criteria for physical frailty as a product of complex system dysregulation distinct from the cumulative-deficit-based frailty index of multimorbiditys. (2021-01-14)

Approximately half of AD dementia cases are mild, one-fifth are severe
What percent of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) sheds light on these trends. (2021-01-13)

Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response. (2021-01-13)

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