Current Metal Composition News and Events

Current Metal Composition News and Events, Metal Composition News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - this leads to the so-called Hall effect. A surprising discovery has now been made at TU Wien: an exotic metal was examined and a giant Hall effect was found to be produced by the material, in the total absence of any magnetic field. (2021-02-22)

Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This could allow the use of nitrous oxide in synthetic chemistry. (2021-02-22)

Locked MOFs are the key to high porosity
Sophisticated geometry design gives rise to a new form of crystalline material. (2021-02-18)

Quickly identify high-performance multi-element catalysts
Catalysts consisting of at least five chemical elements could be the key to overcoming previous limitations in the production of green hydrogen, fuel cells, batteries or CO2 reduction. However, finding the optimal composition of these multi-element catalysts is like looking for a needle in a haystack: testing thousands to millions of possible combinations cannot be realized. (2021-02-17)

Harnessing socially-distant molecular interactions for future computing
Could long-distance interactions between individual molecules forge a new way to compute? A new study of electronic states induced by interactions between individual molecules has potential future application in computers where the state of each individual molecule could be controlled, mirroring binary operation of transistors in current computing. (2021-02-16)

Experimental tests of relativistic chemistry will update the periodic table
Researchers from Osaka University used a particle accelerator and co-precipitation to study the chemical reactivity of single rutherfordium atoms. Such experiments will continue the advancement of relativistic chemistry that is pertinent to a range of applications including renewable energy and new materials. (2021-02-16)

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials
A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies. (2021-02-16)

The comet that killed the dinosaurs
In a study published in Scientific Reports, Avi Loeb puts forth a new theory that could explain the origin and journey of the comet that killed the Chicxulub impactor and others like it. (2021-02-15)

Comet or asteroid: What killed the dinosaurs and where did it come from?
It forever changed history when it crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago. The Chicxulub impactor, as it's known, left behind a crater off the coast of Mexico that spans 93 miles and runs 12 miles deep. (2021-02-15)

Get a load of ZIF! Better delivery of cancer immunotherapy
An antibody loaded onto a porous metal organic framework is released by the acidic environment that surrounds tumors, avoiding the adverse effects of administering the antibody alone. (2021-02-11)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

Stable armchairlike hexazine N6 ring in tungsten hexanitride
We have successfully synthesized WN6 at 126-165 GPa after laser heating up to ?3500 K. The WN6 phase contains novel armchairlike N6 rings. Future efforts in the synthesis and recovery of TMNs will lead to a wealth of knowledge in the novel chemistry and physical properties of the single-bonded hexazine-bearing nitrides. (2021-02-10)

Physicists have optimized the method of smelting the MAX phase
Physicists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University in collaboration with their foreign colleagues have optimized the method for obtaining highly pure Cr2AlC MAX-phase, which is necessary for studying the magnetic properties of this compound when it is doped with manganese. The unique properties of magnetic MAX materials could be used in a wide range of new technologies from magnetic cooling to spintronics. (2021-02-10)

AD diagnostics could become more accessible
A team of researchers from the Laboratory of Biophysics at NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia has summarized metal-containing diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to the researchers, their use could improve access to diagnostic imaging of AD among the risk groups. (2021-02-09)

Lipid composition of microalgae of the Kaliningrad Region was determined
Scientists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Kemerovo State University determined the qualitative and quantitative composition of fatty acids that the lipids of microalgae comprise. The results are expected to benefit medical science, cosmetology, energy production and the production of feed additives and functional food. (2021-02-09)

Insights into lithium metal battery failure open doors to doubling battery life
Researchers led by Prof. CUI Guanglei from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have identified what causes lithium metal batteries (LMBs) to ''self-destruct'' and proposed a way to prevent it. (2021-02-08)

Microbiota transfer therapy for autism: Multi-omic approaches and lessons learned
Recent studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing links between the composition of gut microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a disease believed to affect one in 54 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Krajmalnik-Brown's lecture will propose linkages between gut bacteria and ASD, highlighting encouraging results of a microbiome-targeted, ASD open-label clinical trial. (2021-02-08)

How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer. Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Chemistry have now demonstrated that this is possible at room temperature: molecules of the metal-containing compound molybdenum acetate form an ordered structure on the insulator calcite without jumping to other positions or rotating. Their findings have been presented in the Nature Communications journal. (2021-02-04)

An innovative and non-destructive strategy to analyse material from Mars
The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group, which includes experts in Raman spectroscopy, is currently analysing meteorites with the aim of developing non-destructive analytical strategies for upcoming explorations of Mars materials by the Perseverance rover, shortly due to arrive at the red planet. The strategies will also be used to examine materials collected by the Rosalind Franklin rover and returned to Earth following the Mars Sample Return mission, scheduled to commence in 2026. (2021-02-03)

Salt battery design overcomes bump in the road to help electric cars go the extra mile
Using salt as a key ingredient, Chinese and British researchers have designed a new type of rechargeable battery that could accelerate the shift to greener, electric transport on our roads. (2021-02-01)

Brightening the future of semiconductor-based photocatalytic processes
A collaboration between the Pericàs group with Prof. Timothy Noël and Dr. Paola Riente at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e, The Netherlands), has crystallised in a Nature Communications paper where they provide key insight into the chemical nature of the true photocatalyst involved in the Bi2O3-driven atom-transfer radical addition (ATRA) reaction. (2021-02-01)

Astronomers detect extended dark matter halo around ancient dwarf galaxy
Findings suggest the first galaxies in the universe were more massive than previously thought. (2021-02-01)

Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials
An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys. This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The new materials could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient. (2021-01-29)

Chemists settle battery debate, propel research forward
A team of researchers led by chemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory has identified new details of the reaction mechanism that takes place in batteries with lithium metal anodes. The findings are a major step towards developing smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries for electric vehicles. (2021-01-28)

Solar hydrogen: Photoanodes made of alpha-SnWO4 promise high efficiencies
Photoanodes made of metal oxides are considered to be a viable solution for the production of hydrogen with sunlight. Alpha-SnWO4 has optimal electronic properties for photoelectrochemical water splitting with sunlight, but corrodes easily. Protective layers of nickel oxide prevent corrosion, but reduce the photovoltage and limit the efficiency. Now a team at HZB has investigated at BESSY II what happens at the interface between the photoanode and the protective layer. (2021-01-26)

Wetter weather affects composition, numbers of tiny estuarial phytoplankton
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and increased precipitation, affect both the amount and the composition of picophytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary. The work is a first step in determining how a wetter climate may affect the estuarine ecosystem. (2021-01-25)

Dairy calves benefit from higher-protein starter feed, Illinois study says
Dairy producers know early nutrition for young calves has far-reaching impacts, both for the long-term health and productivity of the animals and for farm profitability. With the goal of increasing not just body weight but also lean tissue gain, a new University of Illinois study finds enhanced milk replacer with high crude-protein dry starter feed is the winning combination. (2021-01-25)

Better bundled: new principle for generating X-rays
X-rays are usually difficult to direct and guide. X-ray physicists at the University of Göttingen have developed a new method with which the X-rays can be emitted more precisely in one direction. To do this, the scientists use a structure of thin layers of materials with different densities of electrons to simultaneously deflect and focus the generated beams. The results of the study were published in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-25)

Photocatalytic reaction in the shadow
Photoelectrochemical water splitting is a promising technology to convert solar energy into value-added fuels. Theoretically, silicon-based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) photocathode can achieve high efficiency. However, the parasitic light absorption caused by catalysts and metals, as well as the lack of metals to form a large band-offset with p-Si, severely limit their performances. Scientists based in China have demonstrated an illumination-reaction decoupled MIS photocathode using n-Si to prevent the parasitic light absorption while establishing a large band-offset. (2021-01-25)

Magnetic waves explain mystery of Sun's outer layer
in a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal, researchers combined observations from a telescope in New Mexico, the United States, with satellites located near Earth to identify a link between magnetic waves in the chromosphere and areas of abundant ionised particles in the hot outer atmosphere. (2021-01-22)

Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
Catalysts are getting smaller - ''single-atom'' catalysts are the logical end point of this downsizing. However, individual atoms can no longer be described using the rules developed from larger pieces of metal, so the rules used to predict which metals will be good catalysts must be revamped - this has now been achieved at TU Wien. As it turns out, single atom catalysts based on much cheaper materials might be even more effective. (2021-01-22)

New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles
Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties. (2021-01-22)

Teamwork in a molecule
Chemists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have demonstrated the value of 'teamwork' by successfully harnessing the interaction between two gallium atoms in a novel compound to split the particularly strong bond between fluorine and carbon. The gallium compound is also cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional alternatives. (2021-01-21)

Electron transfer discovery is a step toward viable grid-scale batteries
The way to boost electron transfer in grid-scale batteries is different than researchers had believed, a new study from the University of Michigan has shown. (2021-01-21)

An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have made a prototype of an anode-free, zinc-based battery that uses low-cost, naturally abundant materials. (2021-01-20)

Astronomers estimate Titan's largest sea is 1,000-feet deep
Far below the gaseous atmospheric shroud on Saturn's largest moon, Titan, lies Kraken Mare, a sea of liquid methane. Cornell University astronomers have estimated that sea to be at least 1,000-feet deep near its center - enough room for a potential robotic submarine to explore. (2021-01-20)

How short circuits in lithium metal batteries can be prevented
There are high hopes for the next generation of high energy-density lithium metal batteries, but before they can be used in our vehicles, there are crucial problems to solve. An international research team led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has now developed concrete guidelines for how the batteries should be charged and operated, maximising efficiency while minimising the risk of short circuits. (2021-01-19)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Nano-thin piezoelectrics advance self-powered electronics
Researchers develop a flexible, printable and nano-thin material that can convert mechanical pressure into electrical energy. It's 800% more efficient than other piezoelectrics based on similar non-toxic materials. A significant step towards better wearable tech, new self-powered electronics and even pacemakers powered by heart beats (2021-01-19)

New tool removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems
'What goes in, must come out' is a familiar refrain. It is especially pertinent to the challenges facing UBC researchers who are investigating methods to remove chemicals and pharmaceuticals from public water systems. Cleaning products, organic dyes and pharmaceuticals are finding their ways into water bodies with wide-ranging negative implications to health and the environment, explains Dr. Mohammad Arjmand, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UBC Okanagan. (2021-01-18)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.