Current Metamaterials News and Events | Page 3

Current Metamaterials News and Events, Metamaterials News Articles.
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3-D inks that can be erased selectively
3-D printing by direct laser writing enables production of micro-meter-sized structures for many applications, from biomedicine to microelectronics to optical metamaterials. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed 3-D inks that can be erased selectively. This allows specific degradation and reassembly of highly precise structures on the micrometer and nanometer scales. The new photoresists are presented in the journal Nature Communications. (2018-08-15)

Scientists design new MRI coil for preclinical studies
Researchers from ITMO University developed and tested an MRI coil providing high-resolution imaging of the whole body of a mouse. Such coils are used in preclinical testing, as well as in imaging of various body systems. The new coil produces images with three times higher resolution than standard commercial volume MRI coils. Scientist used inexpensive materials and manufacturing technology that may be adjusted for various research projects. The research was published in NMR in Biomedicine as the cover story. (2018-08-07)

Ricocheting radio waves monitor the tiniest movements in a room
Metamaterials researchers from Duke University have shown that patterns made by radio waves can detect a person's presence and location anywhere inside of a room. The technology is sensitive enough to detect a person breathing and could lead to new smart home devices for energy savings, security, healthcare and gaming. (2018-08-06)

Optical secrets of disulfide nanotubes are disclosed by Lomonosov MSU Scientists
The findings allow consideration of tungsten disulfide nanotubes as a platform for developing new concepts in nanotube-based photonic devices. (2018-08-01)

Trapping light that doesn't bounce off track for faster electronics
A new protective metamaterial 'cladding' prevents light from leaking out of the very curvy pathways it would travel in a computer chip. (2018-07-30)

NUST MISIS scientists present metamaterial for solar cells and nanooptics
A research team from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Superconducting Metamaterials led by Alexey Basharin, Senior Lecturer and Candidate of Technical Sciences, has developed a metamaterial-dielectric that has unique characteristics and is easy to manufacture. This ease of access will allow researchers to use it to create the latest optical devices. The research results were published in Laser&Photonics Reviews. (2018-07-23)

Mixed halide chemistry can be used to control magnetism in ultrathin magnetic devices
Magnetization in an ultrathin magnetic device can be re-directed beyond the previously known confines of in-plane or out-of-plane spaces, researchers from Boston College report in Advanced Materials. (2018-07-02)

How smart technology gadgets can avoid speed limits
Speed limits apply not only to traffic. There are limitations on the control of light as well, in optical switches for internet traffic, for example. Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology now understand why it is not possible to increase the speed beyond a certain limit - and know the circumstances in which it is best to opt for a different route. (2018-06-28)

Researcher creates 3D printed multimaterial with programmed stiffness
The technology could be useful in various applications, including aircraft wing structures, protective coatings, energy absorption, actuation, flexible armor, artificial muscles, and microrobotics. (2018-06-08)

Cloaking devices -- it's not just 'star trek' anymore
Scientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Hanford will describe the physics behind an underwater acoustic shield designed in her lab. (2018-05-10)

Nanodiamond turns into controllable light source
A research group from ITMO University first time in the world developed a controlled light source based on nanodiamond. Experiments have shown that diamond shell doubles the emission speed light sources and helps to control them without any additional nano- and microstructures. This was achieved due to artificially created defects in a diamond crystal lattice. Obtained results are important for the development of quantum computers and optical networks. The work is published in the Nanoscale. (2018-05-02)

Dielectric metamaterial is dynamically tuned by light
Researchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays. While previous metamaterials control electromagnetic waves through their electric properties, the new technology can also manipulate them through their magnetic properties. It won't melt and can be reconfigured on the fly. (2018-05-01)

3-D printed active metamaterials for sound and vibration control
Researchers have been pushing the capabilities of materials by carefully designing precise structures that exhibit abnormal properties that can control acoustic or optical waves. However, these metamaterials are constructed in fixed geometries, meaning their unique abilities are always fixed. Now, new 3-D printed metamaterial developed by a team led by University of Southern California researchers can be remotely switched between active control and passive states. (2018-04-11)

Thin engineered material perfectly redirects and reflects sound
Metamaterials researchers from Duke University have created a thin plastic structure with geometric details allowing it to control the redirection and reflection of sound waves with almost perfect efficiency. (2018-04-10)

Giant intrinsic chirality from planar dielectric nanostructures
Harvard researchers have developed a metasurface, comprised of a single planar layer of nanostructures, which exhibits strong optical chirality in transmission. This means it can let circularly polarized light of one polarization pass through almost unhindered, while light of the opposite helicity is completely diffracted away. Such capabilities are incredibly useful for a host of applications, such as circular dichroism spectroscopy in the analysis of drug samples, and polarization filters in telecommunications. This work challenges some long-held notions about chiral metamaterials and metasurfaces. (2018-02-23)

Silk fibers could be high-tech 'natural metamaterials'
New research has demonstrated how the nano-architecture of a silkworm's fiber causes 'Anderson localization of light,' a discovery that could lead to various innovations and a better understanding of light transport and heat transfer. (2018-02-01)

Silicon nanoblock arrays create vivid colors with subwavelength resolution
Osaka University researchers demonstrated a range of highly tunable vivid color pixels controlled by the geometry of a monocrystalline silicon metamaterial surface. The pixels created showed dual-color response dependent on the polarization of the light source, as well as subwavelength resolution. These materials have potential applications in high-resolution printing, particularly for anti-counterfeiting technology. They could also be used for optical data storage and three-dimensional displays. (2018-01-25)

'Nanobulb' helps see subwavelength-size objects with ordinary microscope
Scientists from ITMO University have proven that a silicon-gold nanoparticle can act as an effective source of white light when agitated by a pulse laser in IR band. One such (2018-01-25)

Quantum control
An international team consisting of Russian and German scientists has made a breakthrough in the creation of seemingly impossible materials. They have managed to create the world`s first quantum metamaterial which can be used as a control element in superconducting electrical circuits. (2018-01-23)

Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures
Northwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active superlattices. The structures could be programmed to exhibit almost any color across the visible spectrum. (2018-01-18)

Building blocks to create metamaterials
An international team, led by Chiara Daraio, uses techniques from quantum mechanics to create a system for engineering how metamaterials will interact with waves. (2018-01-17)

Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structure
You don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to University of Chicago scientists. Using a set of gyroscopes linked together, physicists explored the behavior of a material whose structure is arranged randomly, instead of an orderly lattice. They found they could set off one-way ripples around the edges, much like spectators in a sports arena -- a 'topological wave,' characteristic of a particularly unusual state of matter. (2018-01-15)

NUST MISIS scientists manage to observe the inner structure of photonic crystals
Photonic crystals are perfect materials for controlling light beams. The crystals almost managed to become the basis for the production of optical processors several years ago, if not for one highly ranked official saying 'no'. Similar to many other materials whose properties strongly depend on their structure, photonic crystals have an issue of reproducibility. To put it more exactly, no one has yet managed to create two large and completely similar photonic crystals. (2018-01-09)

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake
Engineers at Duke University develop a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field. (2017-12-11)

Topological insulators are among this year's top achievements in photonics
Optics & Photonics News recognised a recent study on three-dimensional topological insulators as one of the most promising advances in photonics this year. These structures are capable of controlling light without any losses caused by absorption and material defects, which shows a great potential for applications in optical computers, communication networks, antennas and lasers. (2017-12-01)

Microscopy: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions
Physicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms. (2017-11-30)

Push to twist: Achieving the classically impossible in human-made material
Researchers have designed a metamaterial that can twist to the right or the left in response to a straight, solid push. (2017-11-23)

New quantum materials offer novel route to 3-D electronic devices
Researchers have shown how the principles of general relativity open the door to novel electronic applications such as a three-dimensional electron lens and electronic invisibility devices (2017-11-07)

Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magic
Metamaterials have amazing potential--think invisibility cloaks and perfect lenses--but they are more likely to be found in a Harry Potter novel than a lab. To help bring them closer to reality, Michigan Technological University's Elena Semouchkina has gone back to basics and demonstrated that the fundamental physics of metamaterials is more complex than scientists once thought. (2017-11-06)

Spin-current generation gets mid-IR boost with plasmonic metamaterial
Researchers have begun to use metamaterials, engineered composites that have unique properties not found in nature, to enhance the absorption rates of plasmonic absorbers, and a team in Japan used a trilayered metamaterial to develop a wavelength-selective plasmonic metamaterial absorber on top of a spintronic device to enhance the generation of spin currents from the heat produced in the mid-infrared regime. The research is reported this week in APL Photonics. (2017-10-10)

New methods tackle a perplexing engineering concept
Researchers at the University of Illinois are working to turn a complex materials design problem into an intuitive concept, understandable to engineers from novice to advanced experience levels. The group developed guidelines to help understand materials engineered to become thicker when stretched. This highly useful property, which is not commonly found in nature, has applications for protective sports equipment, body armor and biomedical devices. (2017-10-09)

Study of protein cages strengthens Bristol's position at forefront of synthetic biology
A multidisciplinary team of mathematicians, theoretical physicists, chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol came together to study the self-assembly of protein building into protein cages with possible applications in nanotechnology and synthetic biology. (2017-08-07)

Riding the wave: Pioneering research tames nanoquakes
Researchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones. (2017-08-02)

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?
In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them. (2017-06-22)

Nanosized silicon heater and thermometer combined to fight cancer
Russian physicists from ITMO University have found out that spherical silicon nanoparticles can be effectively heated up, and simultaneously emit light depending on their temperature. According to the scientists, these properties coupled with a good biocompatibility will allow usage of the semiconductor nanoparticles in photothermal therapy and nanosurgery. The researchers plan to control the heating of the silicon particles in the future to internally burn cancer cells without affecting healthy tissue. The results appeared in the prestigious journal Nano Letters. (2017-06-01)

New metamaterial-enhanced MRI technique tested on humans
Scientists from the Netherlands and Russia designed and tested a new metasurface-based technology for enhancing the local sensitivity of MRI scanners on humans for the first time. The metasurface consists of thin resonant strips arranged periodically. Placed under a patient's head, it provided much higher signals from the local brain region. The results published in Scientific Reports, show that the use of metasurfaces can potentially reduce image acquisition time, thus improving comfort for patients, or acquire higher resolution images for better disease diagnosis. (2017-05-25)

Ultrafast tunable semiconductor metamaterial created
An international team of researchers has devised an ultrafast tunable metamaterial based on gallium arsenide nanoparticles, as published by Nature Communications. The new optical metamaterial paves the way to ultrafast information transfer on the nanoscale. (2017-05-17)

Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colors
Nagoya University team replicates unique color of bird plumage. Raspberry-like particle systems simulate the spongy texture of Stellar's jay's blue feathers. These findings represent a new approach to artificial structural color-based pigments. (2017-05-08)

CCNY physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interaction
Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. City College of New York researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways. (2017-05-05)

3-D printers open new design space for wireless devices
Duke materials scientists and chemists have shown a way to bring electromagnetic metamaterials into the third dimension using commercial 3-D printers. Printed metamaterial cubes were found to interact with radio and microwave electromagnetic waves 14 times more strongly than their 2-D counterparts. The breakthrough could revolutionize the rapid design and prototyping of radio frequency devices for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, wireless sensing and communications. (2017-05-04)

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