Current Methamphetamine News and Events | Page 2

Current Methamphetamine News and Events, Methamphetamine News Articles.
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Ohio researchers, partners find meth, similar drug overdoses growing rapidly
The number of overdose deaths involving methamphetamines and amphetamines in the state of Ohio increased more than 5,000 percent over the course of eight years, according to data collected by the Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health. (2018-11-06)

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades
Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address deeper factors driving the epidemic. (2018-09-20)

Opioid users could benefit from meth-relapse prevention strategy, study finds
New research raises the possibility that a wider group of people battling substance use disorders may benefit from a Scripps Research-developed relapse-prevention compound than previously thought. (2018-09-17)

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events
America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-07-12)

New study suggests ovarian hormone may make drug withdrawal symptoms worse for women
Researchers found that a form of the estrogen hormone can contribute to drug relapse in females by worsening withdrawal symptoms. The study looked at the interaction of the female sex hormone estradiol and methamphetamine. (2018-06-18)

Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in men
In a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners. (2018-06-05)

Chemsex linked with increased diagnoses of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections
Chemsex -- the use of crystallized methamphetamine, mephedrone, γ-hydroxybutyrate or γ-butyrolactone and to a lesser extent cocaine and ketamine to facilitate sex -- has emerged as a new phenomenon in the UK and across Europe among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM). (2018-05-23)

UM researcher finds link between crystal methamphetamine and immune changes in HIV
A researcher at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has found that the use of stimulants, such as methamphetamine, can negatively affect the health of HIV-positive persons even when they are adhering to medical treatment. This study indicates that stimulants affect pathways in the immune system that allow HIV to become more active and could expand the reservoir. (2018-05-04)

Identifying 'designer' drugs taken by overdose patients
Medical professionals are scrambling to meet growing demand for emergency room treatment of drug overdoses, but they're hampered by the lack of a quick and easy test to screen patients for synthetic 'designer' drugs. Chemists are developing such a test with the hope that hospitals could eventually use it to choose the appropriate treatment. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-19)

Will run for meth
The brain regions activated in anticipation of methamphetamine are identified in a noninvasive study of male mice published in eNeuro. (2018-03-12)

Opioid abuse leads to heroin use and a hepatitis C epidemic, USC researcher says
Heroin is worse than other drugs because people inject it much sooner, potentially resulting in increased risk of injection-related epidemics such as hepatitis C and HIV, a Keck School of Medicine of USC study shows. As more people use opioids, many switch to heroin because it's more potent and cheaper - a trend that complicates disease prevention as health officials crack down on opioids. (2018-02-22)

An improved anti-addiction medication
Drug addiction continues to plague vast numbers of people across the world, destroying and ending lives, while attempts to develop more effective pharmaceutical addiction treatments continue. Scientists now report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society the development of a potent new medicine to fight addiction, which might also be an effective treatment for epilepsy and other conditions. (2018-02-21)

Heart failure in methamphetamine users: Could this be the next epidemic among vets?
Heart failure associated with methamphetamine use is on the rise among US veterans. In this study, meth users with heart failure, who were an average age of 61, were notably younger than heart failure patients, whose average age was 72 years. The combination of heart failure and methamphetamine use results in more emergency department visits than for heart failure without methamphetamine use. (2017-11-14)

Novel gene therapy approach to treating methamphetamine abuse
While there are no FDA-approved medicines to treat methamphetamine (meth) use disorders, researchers are reporting early findings of a second-generation gene therapy in animal models for meth abuse. Results being presented today at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition demonstrate that the therapy lasts for over eight months, reducing the amount of meth in the brain and meth-induced stimulant effects. (2017-11-13)

Can a pumpkin-shaped molecule bring a different ending to 'Breaking Bad'?
A cheap, sensitive, real-time meth and amphetamine drug detector wristband connected to a smartphone app could become the new alcohol breathalyzer. (2017-09-28)

Unintentional drug use continues among molly users in EDM party scene
Use of MDMA or 'Molly' is common in the electronic dance music scene, but research is showing that many Molly users are using other drugs unknowingly. (2017-09-13)

Methamphetamine use linked to heightened stroke risk in the young
The stimulant methamphetamine, also popularly known as 'speed,' 'ice' and 'meth,' is linked to a heightened risk of stroke among young people, reveals a review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2017-08-23)

New vaccine could someday fight the effects of opioid combinations
Substance abuse is a continuing problem in the US, to the point of being an 'epidemic.' Treatments exist, but far too often patients relapse with devastating impacts on themselves and those around them. Now, scientists report that they have made progress toward a vaccine against the effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in combination with heroin. The researchers are presenting their research at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-21)

Chapman University Publishes research on substance use among transgender students in California
Chapman University has published research on substance abuse among transgender students in California. The research looked at students in middle and high schools in nearly every school district in California. Results showed transgender adolescents were more than two times more likely to engage in substance use in their lifetimes. The paper appears in the Journal of School Health. (2017-08-15)

Research lacking when it comes to heart disease in prison populations
A multi-institution team found multiple areas of research that can be explored in both the incarcerated and released population -- which number more than 13 million Americans -- to better understand and prevent cardiovascular disease. (2017-07-25)

Sleep disturbances predict substance use among college athletes
Preliminary results of a new study show that sleep disturbance is strongly related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs among student athletes in college. (2017-06-06)

Young adult substance abuse down 41 percent among PROSPER program participants
Children who participated in the PROSPER (PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience) program over seven years ago showed lower rates of substance abuse after high school graduation, according to a new study conducted by researchers from Pennsylvania State and Iowa State Universities and published in a recent issue of Psychological Medicine. (2017-05-31)

Oxytocin reduces cravings for methamphetamine
Many people have suggested that addiction hijacks the body's natural drives in the service of compulsive drug use. A new study now suggests that hijacking another natural system in the brain may help overcome drug addiction. Published in Biological Psychiatry, the study shows that administration of oxytocin -- a naturally occurring molecule well known for its role in social bonding and childbirth -- reduces drug-seeking behavior in methamphetamine-addicted rats. (2017-05-31)

Stopping drug abuse can reverse related heart damage
Quitting methamphetamine use can reverse the damage the drug causes to the heart and improve heart function in abusers when combined with appropriate medical treatment, potentially preventing future drug-related cases of heart failure or other worse outcomes, according to a study published today in JACC: Heart Failure. (2017-05-29)

Stimulants may have detrimental effects on muscle control
Researchers have found that current or past use of methamphetamine or other stimulants may lead to psychomotor control deficits, or a reduced ability to control physical movement. (2017-04-20)

Experimental small molecule shows potential in preventing meth relapse
New research from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) suggests that the reason methamphetamine users find it so hard to quit -- 88 percent of them relapse, even after rehab -- is that meth takes advantage of the brain's natural learning process. (2017-03-31)

Impulsive personality linked to greater risk for early onset of meth use
Methamphetamine users who described themselves as impulsive were more likely to have started taking the drug at an earlier age, a study of more than 150 users showed. (2016-10-27)

Could exercise help meth addicts recover? Circadian rhythms are key, study finds
Exercise coupled with a regimen of methamphetamine could help addicts get clean, according to a pre-clinical study published today in The FASEB Journal. The reason lies in the mechanism through which exercise and methamphetamine affect circadian rhythms, the roughly 24-hour cycles that drive all organisms. (2016-10-13)

Scientists awarded special grant to develop memory-altering medication for addiction
Bringing the world one step closer to when destructive addiction-fueling memories can be erased with a single treatment, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have received a National Institutes of Health grant through the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network and the National Institute of Drug Abuse. (2016-10-13)

Methamphetamine and skin wounds: NYIT researcher wins NIH grant to study immune response
NYIT researcher Luis Martinez, Ph.D. has won a $431,700 National Institutes of Health grant to investigate, in mice, methamphetamine's effects on the underlying biological mechanisms that cause inflammation and impair wound healing. (2016-08-19)

Reduced US cocaine and methamphetamine use linked to controls on commercial chemicals
A study by University of Arizona-led team finds that disruptions in access to sodium permanganate, used in cocaine production, and pseudoephedrine, a methamphetamine precursor chemical, which occurred in 2006 and 2007, were associated with the reductions. (2016-08-17)

US and Mexican controls on precursor chemicals may reduce cocaine and meth use in the US
In December 2006, the USA regulated sodium permanganate, a chemical essential to the manufacture of cocaine. In March 2007, Mexico closed a chemical company accused of illicitly importing more than 60 tons of pseudoephedrine, a methamphetamine precursor chemical. A new study published in Addiction has found that those events were associated with large, extended reductions in cocaine and methamphetamine users in the USA. (2016-08-16)

Chronic low back pain linked to higher rates of illicit drug use
People living with chronic low back pain (cLBP) are more likely to use illicit drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine -- compared to those without back pain, reports a study in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2016-07-21)

Drug-use may hamper moral judgment
Regular cocaine and methamphetamine users can have difficulty choosing between right and wrong, perhaps because the specific parts of their brains used for moral processing and evaluating emotions are damaged by their prolonged drug habits. This is according to a study among prison inmates by Samantha Fede and Dr. Kent Kiehl's laboratory at the University of New Mexico and the nonprofit Mind Research Network. The findings are published in Springer's journal Psychopharmacology. (2016-07-13)

Researchers uncover how dopamine transports within the brain
Researchers at University of Florida Health have discovered the mechanics of how dopamine transports into and out of brain cells, a finding that could someday lead to more effective treatment of drug addictions and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. (2016-01-25)

New study holds hope for improving outcomes for children exposed to methamphetamine
In a first of its kind study, researchers followed meth-exposed children to age 7.5 and found more supportive home environments could make a difference in their behavior and emotional control. (2016-01-21)

Researchers identify gene possibly linked with methamphetamine addiction
A new study sheds light on the significance of a potential genetic risk factor for drug addiction and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders. Both genetic and environmental factors are known to influence susceptibility to substance use disorders. However, the genetic basis of these disorders is largely unknown. (2015-12-10)

UC San Diego professors named AAAS Fellows
Six University of California, San Diego professors have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society. They are among 347 members selected this year by colleagues in their disciplines to be honored for 'scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.' (2015-11-23)

Vision test gives insight into the effect of prenatal exposure to recreational drugs
Children exposed to marijuana in the womb show a significant improvement in their ability to track moving objects at age four, according to new vision research. But researchers are warning that the results do not mean marijuana has a beneficial effect on fetal development. (2015-11-19)

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