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Current Microalgal Strain News and Events, Microalgal Strain News Articles.
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Sensor for smart textiles survives washing machine, cars and hammers
If the smart textiles of the future are going to survive all that we throw at them, their components are going to need to be resilient. Now, SEAS researchers have developed an ultra-sensitive, seriously resilient strain sensor that can be embedded in textiles and soft robotic systems. It could be used in everything from virtual reality simulations and sportswear to clinical diagnostics for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's Disease. (2020-11-11)

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related
The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications. (2020-11-10)

Exoskeletons can reduce strain also in health care
Wearable exoskeletons are increasingly being used in physically demanding jobs to support good ergonomics and augment muscular strength. In ground-breaking studies led by researchers at Tampere University and LUT University in Finland, exoskeleton vests were worn by nurses to discover how the new technology would suit the special requirements of patient care. (2020-11-10)

The birth of a bacterial tRNA gene
The Microbial Evolutionary Dynamics Group at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön has directly observed the birth of a tRNA gene, using experimental evolution of bacterial populations in the laboratory. (2020-11-03)

Microbial strains show individualized patterns of stability in the developing infant gut
Microbial strain stability studies of human infants and children, ages shortly after birth (about 6 months) to 6 years, show individualized patterns of microbial strain specificity as the infant gut microbiomes developed. (2020-10-28)

Severe form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease linked to a strain of mouth bacteria
Bacteria from the mouth could hold clues to understanding - and potentially treating - severe ulcerative colitis, a painful bowel disease. (2020-10-28)

Genetic analysis of B. infantis strains reveal functional superiority of activated EVC001 in infants
When it comes to infant probiotics the strain matters. The genetic analysis of a key infant gut bacteria B. infantis, reveals superiority of activated EVC001 strain to provide health benefits to babies. (2020-10-27)

New York City's coronavirus outbreak spread from more European sources than first reported
The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. A new analysis also shows that most of the spread was within the community, as opposed to coming from people who had traveled. (2020-10-26)

A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate
MIT researchers have designed a skin-like device that can be attached to the face and measure small movements such as a twitch or a smile. With this approach, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) could communicate a variety of sentiments with small movements that are measured and interpreted by the device. (2020-10-22)

Swine coronavirus replicates in human cells
A strain of coronavirus that has devastated the pork industry has the potential to infect humans as well, according to new research from the Baric lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health. (2020-10-14)

EPFL scientist gains fresh insight into the origins of earthquakes
The speed and intensity with which seismic waves propagate after an earthquake depend mainly on forces occurring deep inside the rocks along a fault line, according to a study by EPFL scientist François Passelègue. His sophisticated models are giving us fresh insight into the factors that can trigger an earthquake. (2020-10-12)

Identification of a viral factor that impairs immune responses in COVID-19 patients
A research team at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) aimed to characterize the viral factor(s) determining immune activation upon SARS-CoV-2 infection and found that ORF3b, a gene encoded by SARS-CoV-2, is a potent IFN antagonist. (2020-10-09)

Antibodies from patients infected with SARS-CoV in 2003 cross-neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in vitro
Antibodies in serum samples collected from patients infected with SARS-CoV during the 2003 outbreak effectively neutralized SARS-CoV-2 infection in cultured cells, according to a new study. The authors also report that, surprisingly, mice and rabbits immunized with a receptor. (2020-10-09)

Potential COVID-19 vaccines not affected by dominant "G-Strain"
Vaccines currently being developed for COVID-19 should not be affected by recent mutations in the virus, according to a new study involving a University of York virologist. (2020-10-08)

A step toward a universal flu vaccine
Researchers at MIT and the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard are now working on strategies for designing a universal flu vaccine that could work against any flu strain. In a new study, they describe a vaccine that triggers an immune response against an influenza protein segment that rarely mutates but is normally not targeted by the immune system. (2020-10-07)

Scientists at NTU Singapore, MIT make electrifying diamond find
Diamond could conduct electricity like metals when deformed to strains at the nanoscale, according to predictions from a study by an international team of scientists led by NTU Singapore and MIT. Using computer simulations, the team, which also includes researchers from Russia, has shown as an early proof-of-concept that when bent, nanoscale diamond needles could reversibly alter their geometry and hence their electrical properties, giving them a metal-like conductivity at room temperature and pressure. (2020-10-05)

Turning diamond into metal
Researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic. This can be induced dynamically and reversed at will, with no degradation of the diamond material. (2020-10-05)

A RUDN University biologist described how a harmless bacterium turns into a phytopathogen
A researcher from RUDN University suggested that Xanthomonas bacteria that are harmful to plants might have developed from a nonpathogenic related species by receiving virulence genes from other species of bacteria. (2020-10-03)

E. coli engineered to grow on CO2 and formic acid as sole carbon sources?
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed a strategy to grow an E. coli strain to higher cell density solely on CO?and formic acid. Formic acid is a one carbon carboxylic acid, and can be easily produced from CO?using a variety of methods. (2020-09-28)

How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors. A team of researchers at Yokohama National University has proposed a fix to prevent too much stretching while improving the sensing ability of electronics. This could lead to advanced prosthetics or disaster recovery robotics. They published their results on July 29 in the Scientific Reports. (2020-09-24)

Caregiving factors may affect hospitalization risk among disabled older adults
Few studies have investigated the potential impact of caregivers and caregiver factors on older adults' likelihood of being hospitalized. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has now provided some insights. (2020-09-23)

Placing barthelonids on the tree of life
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have clearly defined the phylogenetic position of barthelonids, a group of microscopic free-living anaerobic biflagellates. Their findings suggest that the Barthelona spp. represent a clade of metamonads that branched off early in evolutionary history. Additionally, phylogenomic data confirmed their specific commonality and transcriptome analysis outlined the likely evolutionary history of their ATP-generating organelles. (2020-09-23)

CHOP researchers find MIS-C associated with myocardial injury
Using sensitive parameters to assess cardiac function, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that cardiac involvement in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) differs from Kawasaki disease (KD) and is associated with myocardial injury. The findings were published recently in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-09-21)

Physicists "trick" photons into behaving like electrons using a "synthetic" magnetic field
Scientists have discovered an elegant way of manipulating light using a ''synthetic'' Lorentz force -- which in nature is responsible for many fascinating phenomena including the Aurora Borealis. (2020-09-14)

Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to the body's first line of defense
Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to interferon, one of the body's first line of defense. (2020-09-10)

Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products. In one of several projects under way at the Flinders Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, researchers are looking to extract value from crayfish shells and other marine waste via a 'green' fluidic processing machine developed at the University. (2020-09-08)

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion. (2020-09-08)

Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers from the Paul-Drude-Institut in Berlin, the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden and the Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have demonstrated the use of elastic vibrations to manipulate the spin states of optically active color centers in SiC at room temperature. They show a non-trivial dependence of the acoustically induced spin transitions on the spin quantization direction, which can lead to chiral spin-acoustic resonances. These findings are important for applications in future quantum-electronic devices. (2020-09-04)

Financial strains significantly raise risk of suicide attempts
Financial strains such as high debt, low income and unemployment are associated with suicide attempts and should be considered key factors when assessing mental health interventions, a new study from Duke Health researchers shows. While the study was undertaken before the COVID-19 pandemic, the findings are especially relevant within the context of the economic downturn triggered by the spread of the virus. (2020-09-03)

Japanese sake: the new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting ornithine
Researchers from the Nara Institute of Science and Technology and the Nara Prefecture Institute of Industrial Development have found that that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine. Ornithine has been found to reduce fatigue and improve sleep quality, and the non-genetically modified mutant yeast strain discovered in this study could be easily applied to brewing sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage, as well as wine and beer. (2020-08-27)

Battery life for wearable electronic devices could be improved
Researchers in WMG and the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick have found that asymmetric stresses within electrodes used in certain wearable electronic devices provides an important clue as to how to improve the durability and lifespan of these batteries. (2020-08-25)

New approach soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap? What causes seemingly solid ground to suddenly break free into a landslide? Defining exactly how soft materials flow and seize has eluded researchers for years, but a new study explains this complex motion using relatively simple experiments. The ability to define - and eventually predict - soft material flow will benefit people dealing with everything from spreadable cheese to avalanches. (2020-08-24)

​NTU Singapore scientists develop artificial intelligence system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision. (2020-08-13)

Texas A&M researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife
There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-08-11)

Evolutionary assimilation of foreign DNA in a new host
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego used genetic engineering and laboratory evolution to test the functionality of DNA placed into a new species and study how it can mutate to become functional if given sufficient evolutionary time. (2020-08-10)

Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it. (2020-08-07)

Faster rates of evolution are linked to tiny genomes, study finds
Inside every cell lies a genome - a full set of DNA that contains the instructions for building an organism. Across the biological world, genomes show a staggering diversity in size but scientists still don't fully understand why. Now, scientists have found a link between mutation rate - how quickly the DNA sequence changes - and genome size. Writing in Current Biology, the researchers reported that prokaryotes with higher mutation rates lose genes at a faster pace, and therefore have smaller genomes. (2020-08-06)

AI may offer a better way to ID drug-resistant superbugs
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have shown that different strains of the same bacterial pathogen can be distinguished by a machine learning analysis of their growth dynamics alone, which can then also accurately predict other traits such as resistance to antibiotics. The demonstration could point to methods for identifying diseases and predicting their behaviors that are faster, simpler, less expensive and more accurate than current standard techniques. (2020-08-04)

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2
SARS-CoV-2 mutation rate remains low. Across Europe and Italy, the most widespread is strain G, while the L strain from Wuhan is gradually disappearing. These mutations, however, do not impinge on the process of developing effective vaccines (2020-08-03)

Presenting a SARS-CoV-2 mouse model to study viral responses and vaccine candidates
Researchers who generated a strain of SARS-CoV-2 that can infect mice used it to produce a new mouse model of infection that may help facilitate testing of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics. (2020-07-30)

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