Current Microbes News and Events

Current Microbes News and Events, Microbes News Articles.
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Microbes help unlock phosphorus for plant growth
A research team led by the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has shown that microbes taken from trees growing beside pristine mountain-fed streams in Western Washington could make phosphorus trapped in soils more accessible to agricultural crops. (2020-11-24)

Plant research seals importance of microbes for survival and growth
Scientists have revealed that plants have a 'sealing' mechanism supported by microbes in the root that are vital for the intake of nutrients for survival and growth. (2020-11-20)

Antiviral defense from the gut
The study demonstrates how a subset of common gut bacteria renders mice resistant to viral infections. Experiments identify a specific bacterial population sharing a common molecule on their surface that is responsible for triggering natural antiviral immunity The work sets stage for development of preventive treatments that boost resistance to viruses in humans (2020-11-18)

Researchers find connection between household chemicals and gut microbiome
A team of researchers for the first time has found a correlation between the levels of bacteria and fungi in the gastrointestinal tract of children and the amount of common chemicals found in their home environment. The work, published this month in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, could lead to better understanding of how these semi-volatile organic compounds may affect human health. (2020-11-12)

The lung microbiome may affect lung cancer pathogenesis and prognosis
Enrichment of the lungs with oral commensal microbes was associated with advanced stage disease, worse prognosis, and tumor progression in patients with lung cancer, according to results from a study published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-11-11)

Mining rocks in orbit could aid deep space exploration
The first mining experiments conducted in space could pave the way for new technologies to help humans explore and establish settlements on distant worlds, a study suggests. (2020-11-10)

Clay subsoil at Earth's driest place may signal life on Mars
Diverse microbes discovered in the clay-rich, shallow soil layers in Chile's dry Atacama Desert suggest that similar deposits below the Martian surface may contain microorganisms, which could be easily found by future rover missions or landing craft. (2020-11-05)

Nanobodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2
Two separate studies have identified nanobodies - which could be produced less expensively than monoclonal antibodies - that bind tightly to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and efficiently neutralize SARS-CoV-2 in cells. (2020-11-05)

Dietary supplement may help in the treatment of fatty liver
A recent study by researchers at the University of Jyväskylä was successful in partially preventing fatty liver disease in rats. Rats with fatty liver disease were fed with a dietary supplement that is known to increase the growth of good bacteria in the gut. Simultaneous with the increased abundance of the bacteria, the liver fat content decreased significantly. In addition, preliminary results from a human study seem promising. (2020-11-04)

Why protecting the brain against infection takes guts
The brain is uniquely protected against invading bacteria and viruses, but its defence mechanism has long remained a mystery. Now, a study in mice, confirmed in human samples, has shown that the brain has a surprising ally in its protection: the gut. (2020-11-04)

Hungry plants rely on their associated bacteria to mobilize unavailable iron
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research have found that, faced with limiting iron, plants direct their microbiota to mobilise this essential nutrient for optimal growth. (2020-11-02)

Biologists shed light on mystery of how microbes evolve and affect hosts
While associations between microbes and their hosts have long been known, little is known about how microbes evolve and how their evolution affects the health of their hosts. Now, researchers find that as microbes evolve and adapt to their unique hosts, they become less beneficial to hosts of other genotypes, suggesting that there is probably not one universally healthy microbiome and that transplanted microbes need time to adapt to a host before they bring benefits. (2020-11-02)

How the immune system deals with the gut's plethora of microbes
New research suggests that our immune system may play an active role in shaping the digestive-tract flora, which is tightly linked to health and disease. (2020-10-29)

Microbial strains show individualized patterns of stability in the developing infant gut
Microbial strain stability studies of human infants and children, ages shortly after birth (about 6 months) to 6 years, show individualized patterns of microbial strain specificity as the infant gut microbiomes developed. (2020-10-28)

Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a study published today in eLife. (2020-10-27)

Microbial diversity below seafloor is as rich as on Earth's surface
For the first time, researchers have mapped the biological diversity of marine sediment, one of Earth's largest global biomes. The research team discovered that microbial diversity in the dark, energy-limited world beneath the seafloor is as diverse as in Earth's surface biomes. (2020-10-20)

NYU Abu Dhabi study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin. (2020-10-19)

CRISPR-induced immune diversification in host-virus populations
Just like humans, microbes have equipped themselves with tools to recognize and defend themselves against viral invaders. In a continual evolutionary battle between virus and host, CRISPR-Cas act as a major driving force of strain diversity in host-virus systems. (2020-10-19)

Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called ''macrophage migration inhibitory factor'' is the maestro of daily rhythms. (2020-10-19)

Those funky cheese smells allow microbes to 'talk' to and feed each other
Researchers found that bacteria essential to ripening cheese can sense and respond to compounds produced by fungi in the rind and released into the air, enhancing the growth of some species of bacteria over others. The make-up of the cheese microbiome is critical to flavor and quality of the cheese. (2020-10-16)

Invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities
New research led by University of Konstanz ecologists reveals invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities and identifies the soil microbiome as a major driver of invasion success. (2020-10-05)

Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Combining solar-harvesting materials with carbon-dioxide-consuming microbes could be an efficient way to generate clean fuels. (2020-10-05)

Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence infant gut bacteria, risk of childhood obesity
Events at birth may affect the microbes living in a baby's gut during the first few months of life, leading to a higher risk of childhood obesity and allergies, according to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology. (2020-10-02)

Carb-eating bacteria under viral threat
Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates -- that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria. (2020-10-01)

Fecal transplantation can restore the gut microbiota of C-section babies
Birth by Cesarean section is detrimental to normal gut microbiota development. Researchers demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota development can be restored by postnatal, orally-delivered transplantation of maternal fecal microbiota. (2020-10-01)

Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter
Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn't altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research. (2020-09-30)

Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions. (2020-09-24)

Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead. These findings are detailed in research published today in Communications Earth and Environment. (2020-09-22)

Phosphine on Venus
An international team of astronomers detected phosphine (PH3) in the atmosphere of Venus. They studied the origin of phosphine, but no inorganic processes, including supply from volcanos and atmospheric photochemistry can explain the detected amount of phosphine. The phosphine is believed to originate from unknown photochemistry or geochemistry, but the team does not completely reject the possibility of biological origin. This discovery is crucial to examine the validity of phosphine as a biomarker. (2020-09-15)

Mayo scientists develop mathematical index to distinguish healthy microbiome from diseased
What causes some people to develop chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and metabolic syndrome while others stay healthy? A major clue could be found in their gut microbiome -- the trillions of microbes living inside the digestive system that regulate various bodily functions. (2020-09-15)

Hints of life on Venus
An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially, or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. The detection of phosphine molecules, which consist of hydrogen and phosphorus, could point to extra-terrestrial 'aerial' life. (2020-09-14)

When methane-eating microbes eat ammonia instead
As a side effect of their metabolism, microorganisms living on methane can also convert ammonia. In the process, they produce nitric oxide (NO), a central molecule in the global nitrogen cycle. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (DE), and Radboud University, Nijmegen (NL), now discovered the enzyme that produces NO, closing an important gap in our understanding of how methanotrophs deal with rising environmental ammonia concentrations. (2020-09-13)

Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect. But researchers now report in ACS Nano that they have developed an ingestible capsule that in rat studies captured bacteria and other biological samples while passing through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. (2020-09-09)

Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey
A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a ''soft'' tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of ''hard'' ticks. (2020-09-09)

Gut microbes could allow space travelers to stay healthy on long voyages
Space travel is associated with a variety of negative health effects, including bone loss and mental health issues, which could limit our ability to undertake long-distance space missions, such as a mission to Mars. A new review highlights the potential of treatments that enhance gut microbes as a way to protect space travelers during long voyages. (2020-09-08)

Antibiotics affect breast milk microbiota in mothers of preterm infants: University of Toronto study
A team led by researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children has found that mothers of preterm babies have highly individual breast milk microbiomes, and that even short courses of antibiotics have prolonged effects on the diversity and abundance of microbes in their milk. (2020-09-03)

Viruses could be harder to kill after adapting to warm environments
Enteroviruses and other pathogenic viruses that make their way into surface waters can be inactivated by heat, sunshine and other microbes, thereby reducing their ability to spread disease. But researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that global warming could cause viruses to evolve, rendering them less susceptible to these and other disinfectants, such as chlorine. (2020-09-02)

Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
An international team of scientists led by Christopher Bellas from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, studying life on the surface of glaciers in the Arctic and Alps challenge assumptions on virus evolution. Their study, now published in the journal Nature Communications shows that, contrary to expectations, the viruses on glaciers in the Alps, Greenland and Spitsbergen are remarkably stable in the environment. (2020-09-02)

Study tracks human milk nutrients in infant microbiome
A new study in mice helps explain why gut microbiomes of breastfed infants can differ greatly from those of formula-fed infants. (2020-09-01)

Expanding researchers' knowledge of the microbial defense toolkit
A new study identifies a wide array of previously unknown molecular functions and enzymatic activities microbes use to protect against viral threats. (2020-08-27)

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