Current Microbiology News and Events | Page 25

Current Microbiology News and Events, Microbiology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
How Salmonella forms evil twins to evade the body's defenses
To swim or not? The same biological control that determines which capability genetically identical Salmonella will have impacts the virulence of the food pathogen. Swimmers do better in the gut, but non-motile Salmonella avoid triggering killer cells. An unusual protein turns on or off the manufacture of swimming apparatus in each new bacterium. (2011-12-08)

Antibiotics in swine feed encourage gene exchange
A study to be published in the online journal mBio on Nov. 29 shows that adding antibiotics to swine feed causes microorganisms in the guts of these animals to start sharing genes that could spread antibiotic resistance. (2011-11-28)

Closer to a cure for eczema
Scientists have found that a strain of yeast implicated in inflammatory skin conditions, including eczema, can be killed by certain peptides and could potentially provide a new treatment for these debilitating skin conditions. This research is published today in the Society for Applied Microbiology's journal, Letters in Applied Microbiology. (2011-11-23)

Report answers questions about E. coli: The good, the bad and the deadly
It has been the cause of infamous international food-borne disease outbreaks and yet it is the most studied bacterium in science, an essential part of the human digestive tract, and a backbone of the biotech industry. To enhance public understanding of the bacterium Escherichia coli, the American Academy of Microbiology brought together the nation's leading experts to consider and answer some of the most frequently asked questions about this multifaceted microorganism. (2011-11-15)

Researchers closer to the super bug puzzle
The treatment of serious infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (Golden Staph) is complicated by the development of antibiotic resistance. Seriously ill patients, vulnerable to infections can be at additional risk if antimicrobial agents become less effective in fighting infections. (2011-11-10)

Bonnie Bassler chosen North American Laureate for L'OREAL-UNESCO award
Bonnie Bassler, immediate past president of the American Society for Microbiology and Chair of the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Microbiology, has been named the 2012 Laureate for North America of the L'OREAL‐UNESCO Awards (2011-11-08)

USC microbiologists identify two molecules that kill lymphoma cells in mice
Researchers at the University of Southern California have identified two molecules that may be more effective cancer killers than are currently available on the market. (2011-11-06)

Research aims to prevent diabetic kidney failure
The enzyme arginase-2 plays a major role in kidney failure, and blocking the action of this enzyme might lead to protection against renal disease in diabetes, according to researchers. (2011-11-04)

Thomas Jefferson is the first high school to subscribe to the Journal of Visualized Experiments
Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology is the first post-secondary school to subscribe to the Journal of Visualized Experiments. (2011-10-24)

Scientists report major advance in the treatment of Hendra virus
A collaborative research team from Boston University School of Medicine, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the University of Texas Medical Branch and Galveston National Laboratory, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, and the National Cancer Institute, reports a breakthrough in the development of an effective therapy against a deadly virus, Hendra virus. (2011-10-19)

UT Southwestern research could lead to new treatments for IBD, viral infections
The intestinal ecosystem is even more dynamic than previously thought, according to two studies by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers published in the latest issue of Science. (2011-10-19)

Study could help improve gene therapy for heart disease, cancer
A Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study could lead to improved gene therapies for conditions such as heart disease and cancer as well as more effective vaccines for tuberculosis, malaria and other diseases. (2011-10-12)

Can antivirulence drugs stop infections without causing resistance?
Antivirulence drugs disarm pathogens rather than kill them, and although they could be effective in theory, antivirulence drugs have never been tested in humans. A new study to be published in the online journal mBio on Tuesday, Oct. 18 reveals these drugs have the potential to fight infection while avoiding the pitfalls of drug resistance. (2011-10-10)

Global biotech firm partners with CHEO researcher to address a technology gap in infectious disease
The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute is pleased to announce that one of its principal investigators in infectious disease has signed a contract with Life Technologies, an internationally renowned biotech tools company headquartered in Carlsbad, Calif., to share information that will help to develop tests that uniquely amplify and detect the DNA coding for infectious diseases. Dr. Robert Slinger will focus on bacteria that cause severe infectious diseases. (2011-10-03)

Raw sewage: Home to millions of undescribed viruses
Biologists have described only a few thousand different viruses so far, but a new study reveals a vast world of unseen viral diversity that exists right under our noses. A paper to be published Tuesday, Oct. 4, in the online journal mBio explores ordinary raw sewage and finds that it is home to thousands of novel, undiscovered viruses, some of which could relate to human health. (2011-10-03)

Virus kills breast cancer cells in laboratory
A nondisease-causing virus kills human breast cancer cells in the laboratory, creating opportunities for potential new cancer therapies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers who tested the virus on three different breast cancer types that represent the multiple stages of breast cancer development. (2011-09-22)

Stem cells, potential source of cancer-fighting T cells
Adult stem cells from mice converted to antigen-specific T cells -- the immune cells that fight cancer tumor cells -- show promise in cancer immunotherapy and may lead to a simpler, more efficient way to use the body's immune system to fight cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2011-09-20)

UTHealth student earns fellowships to research major source of bacterial infections
A doctoral student at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has been awarded two research fellowships to study the spread of E. coli, a hard-to-treat bacterium that can lead to food poisoning. (2011-09-20)

2009 H1N1 pandemic flu more damaging to lungs, opens opportunities for bacterial infection
Many of the people who died from the new strain of H1N1 influenza that broke out in 2009 were suffering from another infection as well: pneumonia. A new study to be published Tuesday, Sept. 20, in the online journal mBio reveals how the two infections, pandemic influenza and pneumonia, interact to make to make a lethal combination. (2011-09-19)

The American Society for Microbiology honors Andrea Endimiani
Andrea Endimiani, M.D., Ph.D., Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, University of Bern, Switzerland, has been chosen by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to receive a 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award for combining basic microbiology, epidemiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, and molecular biology to investigate the impact of drug resistance traits on the outcome of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. (2011-09-13)

The American Society for Microbiology honors Benjamin P. Howden
Benjamin P. Howden, Ph.D., Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia, has been chosen by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to receive a 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award. Sponsored by the ASM, this award recognizes an early career scientist for research excellence in microbiology and infectious diseases. (2011-09-13)

The American Society for Microbiology honors Zachary A. Klase
Zachary A. Klase, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, M.D., has been chosen by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to receive a 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award for his outstanding research on HIV-1 pathogenesis and RNA interference mechanisms in mammalian cells. Sponsored by Merck, US Human Health Division, this award recognizes an early career scientist for research excellence in microbiology and infectious diseases. (2011-09-13)

LA BioMed investigator, Dr. Ashraf Ibrahim, honored by American Society for Microbiology
Ashraf Ibrahim, Ph.D., principal investigator at LA BioMed who specializes in infectious diseases, was recently honored by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and the ICAAC (Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy) Program Committee in the area of Therapy and Prevention of Microbial Disease. Dr. Ibrahim will be honored at the conference which is being held Sept. 17-20, 2011, in Chicago, Ill., the site of the 51st annual ICAAC. (2011-09-13)

The American Society for Microbiology honors Jörn Coers
Jörn Coers, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, is honored by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to receive a 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award for his work studying the molecular and genetic determinants that enable mammalian host cells to mount immune responses against intracellular pathogens. Sponsored by Merck, US Human Health Division, this award recognizes an early career scientist for research excellence in microbiology and infectious disease. (2011-09-13)

The American Society for Microbiology honors Alison Criss
Alison K. Criss, Ph.D., University of Virginia, Charlottesville, has been chosen by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) to receive a 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award for her outstanding research on bacterial pathogenesis. Sponsored by Merck, US Human Health Division, this award recognizes an early career scientist for research excellence in microbiology and infectious diseases. (2011-09-13)

Reports highlight the evolving role of clinical microbiology laboratories
With the increasing availability of sophisticated technologies to rapidly diagnose and treat infectious diseases, the duties and the role of clinical laboratory microbiologists, who traditionally perform these tests, could see significant changes in the next few years. That is one of the conclusions of a series of reports published in a special supplement to the September 2011 Journal of Clinical Microbiology. (2011-09-08)

Cryptococcus infections misdiagnosed in many AIDS patients
Most AIDS patients, when diagnosed with a fungal infection known simply as cryptococcosis, are assumed to have an infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, but a study from Duke University Medical Center suggests that a sibling species, Cryptococcus gattii, is a more common cause than was previously known. The difference between these strains could make a difference in treatment, clinical course, and outcome. (2011-09-01)

Lawson researchers share in $2.2 million grant
Lawson Health Research Institute's Drs. Peter Cadieux and Hassan Razvi have been awarded just over $566,000 as part of a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health Research (NIH). With this funding, Cadieux and Razvi will explore the potential of novel coatings to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to urinary tract stents and catheters. (2011-08-30)

UGA symposium explores extreme microbes' bioenergy potential
Experts on microorganisms that thrive in extreme environments will convene at the University of Georgia for 'Extremophiles: Key to Bioenergy?' -- a two-day symposium at the UGA Center for Continuing Education Conference Center and Hotel, Sept. 19-20. (2011-08-29)

Single vaccines to protect against both rabies and Ebola
Researchers from Thomas Jefferson University, among other institutions, including the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have developed single vaccines to protect against both rabies and the Ebola virus. (2011-08-25)

George Mason research team uncovers new factor in HIV infection
A George Mason University researcher team has revealed the specific process by which the HIV virus infects healthy T cells -- a process previously unknown. The principal investigator, HIV researcher Yuntao Wu, says he hopes this breakthrough will start a new line on inquiry into how researchers can use this knowledge to create drugs that could limit or halt HIV infection. (2011-08-24)

Researchers uncover source of Haitian cholera outbreak
Employing technology that reads the entire DNA code, researchers led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the Technical University of Denmark have pinpointed the source of a cholera outbreak in Haiti that killed more than 6,000 people and sickened 300,000. Using whole genome sequencing, which spells out the billions of chemical bases in DNA, the team of researchers provided the strongest evidence yet that peacekeepers from Nepal, where cholera is widespread, brought the disease to Haiti. (2011-08-23)

A faster, cheaper way to diagnose TB
Researchers have discovered a faster, cheaper method for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). A major barrier in TB prevention, especially in developing countries, is that diagnosis is slow and costly. Dr. Olivier Braissant and his colleagues have developed a method which could potentially decrease the time taken to make a diagnosis. Their method is also cheaper than the current fastest methods. This research has been published today in the Society for Applied Microbiology's Journal of Applied Microbiology. (2011-08-16)

51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
News media registration for the annual infectious diseases meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) is now open. The 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) will be held Sept. 17-20, 2011 at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago. (2011-08-03)

UNH researchers help find natural products potential of frankia
Soil-dwelling bacteria of the genus Frankia have the potential to produce a multitude of natural products, including antibiotics, herbicides, pigments, anticancer agents, and other useful products, according to an article in the June 2011 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. University of New Hampshire professor of microbiology and genetics Louis Tisa, a Frankia expert, contributed the genomic analysis to this study. (2011-08-02)

Down but not out: Rare good surviving cells may boost immunity in aging
The decline in immune function with age is viewed as the most important factor contributing to older adults' increased infections and decreased response to vaccination. Aging brings about a selective decline in the number and function of T cells -- a type of white blood cell critical in the immune system's response to infection. But the few T cells that survive the longest may better protect against infections such as the flu, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Arizona College of Medicine ‑ Tucson. The researchers now are looking for ways to increase the number of these surviving T cells to improve protection against disease in older adults. (2011-08-01)

New edition of Manual of Clinical Microbiology offers digital access
ASM Press announces the availability of the newest edition of its authoritative reference for clinical laboratory professionals. The Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th edition, is available in both print and, for the first time, a digital edition. (2011-08-01)

U of M researchers may have discovered key to help women fight infections during pregnancy
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have identified the underlying mechanisms for this physiologic immune suppression that may lead to new therapies to help ward off infections during pregnancy. (2011-07-21)

Newly designed molecule blocks chlamydia bacteria
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have discovered a way to block the damaging actions of Chlamydia, the bacteria responsible for the largest number of sexually transmitted infections in the United States. (2011-07-20)

NIH funds Emory-led consortium to advance AIDS vaccine research
A consortium of leading vaccine researchers at Emory University and partner institutions has received a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant aimed at developing an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine. The five-year program project grant of more than $26 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases , part of the NIH, will fund the Emory Consortium for AIDS Vaccine Research in Nonhuman Primates. The research will be conducted primarily at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory. (2011-07-18)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.