Current Microbiome News and Events

Current Microbiome News and Events, Microbiome News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Neonatal antibiotic use associated with reduced growth in boys
Exposure to antibiotics in the first few weeks of life is associated with reduced weight and height in boys up to the age of six, but not girls, reports a paper in Nature Communications. The study, led by Prof. Omry Koren, of Bar-Ilan University, together with Prof. Samuli Rautava, of the University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, suggests that this effect may be due to changes in the development of the gut microbiome. (2021-01-26)

Novel molecules to combat asthma and covid-related lung diseases discovered
Australian researchers have made the extraordinary discovery of two molecules - one found in a commercially available dietary supplement - that provide profound protection in experimental models of asthma and can also substantially reduce the severity of asthma attacks. The molecules also appear to have a role in treating the respiratory illness that is often fatal in people with serious COVID-19. (2021-01-25)

Newly discovered subset of brain cells fight inflammation with instructions from the gut
A team led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, has shown that a specific astrocyte sub-population can do the opposite, instead serving a protective, anti-inflammatory function within the brain based on signals regulated by the bacteria that reside in the gut. (2021-01-25)

Meta-Apo supports cheaper, quicker microbiome functional assessment
A new algorithm called Meta-Apo, developed by researchers led by JING Gongchao of the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) may reduce the need for expensive, time-consuming whole-genome sequencing computations to understand how a microbiome functions. (2021-01-22)

Microbiome Search Engine 2 helps researchers explore microbiome space
To correlate the newly developed microbiomes with existing data sets, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and their collaborators developed the Microbiome Search Engine 2 (MSE 2). (2021-01-22)

Study suggests that gut fungi are not associated with Parkinson's disease
The bacterial gut microbiome is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), but no studies had previously investigated he role of fungi in the gut. In this novel study published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, a team of investigators at the University of British Columbia examined whether the fungal constituents of the gut microbiome are associated with PD. (2021-01-21)

Seeds transfer their microbes to the next generation
Scientists have been pondering if the microbiome of plants is due to nature or nurture. Research at Stockholm University, published in Environmental Microbiology, showed that oak acorns contain a large diversity of microbes, and that oak seedlings inherit their microbiome from these acorns. The microorganisms found on the seed are often valuable for the plant, promoting its growth and protecting it against certain diseases. Each plant species harbours a distinct microbial community. (2021-01-21)

New study: nine out of ten US infants experience gut microbiome deficiency
A new peer-reviewed study reveals that the vast majority of US infants may be suffering from a substantial deficiency in an important bacterium key to breast milk utilization and immune system development, as well as protection against gut pathogens linked to common newborn conditions such as colic and diaper rash. The study is the largest to date to benchmark the widespread deficiency in gut bacteria among US infants, and the resulting diminished function of their gut microbiomes. (2021-01-21)

Study in twins identifies fecal microbiome differences in food allergies
A new study out of the University of Chicago and Stanford University on pairs of twins with and without food allergies has identified potential microbial players in this condition. (2021-01-19)

The cancer microbiome reveals which bacteria live in tumors
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised an algorithm to remove contaminated microbial genetic information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). With a clearer picture of the microbiota living in various organs in both healthy and cancerous states, researchers will now be able to find new biomarkers of disease and better understand how numerous cancers affect the human body. (2021-01-13)

MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease
A new study from UBC researchers suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD). (2021-01-13)

Gut microbes may antagonize or assist in anorexia
Anorexia is a debilitating eating disorder, and was long thought to be purely psychological. New research is challenging this by revealing that gut microbes may have a significant role in anorexia. A recent review examines the evidence that gut microbes can contribute to anorexia and may provide a new method to treat it. (2021-01-12)

Poor gut health connected to severe COVID-19, new review shows
In a review published this week in mBio, researchers examined emerging evidence suggesting that poor gut health adversely affects COVID-19 prognosis. (2021-01-12)

Scientists reveal how gut microbes can influence bone strength in mice
Gut microbes passed from female mice to their offspring, or shared between mice that live together, may influence the animals' bone mass, says a new study published today in eLife. (2021-01-12)

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing. A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults as previous studies have suggested. (2021-01-12)

TU Graz identifies bacterium that protects rice plants against diseases
With their expertise in microbiome research, the researchers at the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology were able to demonstrate how a specific bacterium inside the seeds of rice plants effectively and in an eco-friendly way inhibits destructive plant pathogens. (2021-01-11)

Study reveals strong links between gut microbes, diet and metabolic health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind has uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health. This interrelationship appears to associate with an individual's risk of some serious conditions, including diabetes and heart disease. The study shows that gut microbe composition is highly individualized, and these findings could be used to provide personal dietary advice for better health. (2021-01-11)

Landmark human study is first to reveal strong links between gut microbes, diet and health
The largest and most detailed study of its kind uncovered strong links between a person's diet, the microbes in their gut (microbiome) and their health. Some of the identified microbes are so novel that they have not yet been named. These findings could be used to provide personalized dietary advice for better health, based on gut microbiome testing. (2021-01-11)

Landmark study reveals link between gut microbes, diet and illnesses
Diets rich in healthy and plant-based foods encourages the presence of gut microbes that are linked to a lower risk of common illnesses including heart disease, research has found. (2021-01-11)

Link between dietary fiber and depression partially explained by gut-brain interactions
Fiber is a commonly recommended part of a healthy diet. That's because it's good for your health in so many ways--from weight management to reducing the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. A new study also finds that it might be linked with a reduced risk of depression, especially in premenopausal women. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-06)

Gut microbe may promote breast cancers
A microbe found in the colon and commonly associated with the development of colitis and colon cancer also may play a role in the development of some breast cancers, according to new research from investigators with the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. (2021-01-06)

Gum disease-causing bacteria borrow growth molecules from neighbors to thrive
The human body is filled with friendly bacteria. However, some of these microorganisms, such as Veillonella parvula, may be too nice. These peaceful bacteria engage in a one-sided relationship with pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, helping the germ multiply and cause gum disease, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study. (2021-01-05)

Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
Currently, the only thing citrus growers can do to protect their crops from HLB is control the insect vector. Dozens of researchers are trying to find ways to manage the disease, using strategies ranging from pesticides to antibiotics to CLas-sniffing dogs. Understanding the plant microbiome, an exciting new frontier in plant disease management, is another strategy. (2021-01-05)

Research shows a few beneficial organisms could play key role in treating type 2 diabetes
Researchers have found that a few organisms in the gut microbiome play a key role in type 2 diabetes, opening the door to possible probiotic treatments for a serious metabolic disease affecting roughly one in 10 Americans. (2021-01-04)

Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
A review study led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the CREAF and the University of Aveiro concludes that nanoplastics change the composition and diversity of gut microbiome in vertebrates and invertebrates. The effects of a widespread and prolonged exposure to nanoplastics observed in animal models could be applied to humans. (2020-12-21)

The incredible, variable bacteria living in your mouth
In a study published in Genome Biology researchers led by Harvard University examined the human oral microbiome and discovered tremendous variability in bacterial subpopulations living in certain areas of the mouth. In many cases, the team was able to identify a handful of genes that might explain a particular bacterial group's habitat specificity. (2020-12-18)

Maternal diet during lactation shapes functional abilities of milk bacteria
The mother's diet while breastfeeding can shape the profile of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), a type of complex carbohydrate in the mother's milk. Changing the HMOs, which are food and fodder for healthy microbes, in turn modifies the functional abilities of the milk microbiome. (2020-12-16)

An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study from University of Illinois shows. Avocados are a healthy food that is high in dietary fiber and monounsaturated fat. However, it was not clear how avocados impact the microbes in the gastrointestinal system or 'gut.' (2020-12-15)

Phase 1 trial assesses whether fecal microbiota transplant impacts cancer patients resistant to immu
In one of the first in-human studies to investigate whether modifying the gut microbiome by a fecal microbiota transplant could make cancer immunotherapy more effective, researchers analyzing this in ten cancer patients with refractory melanoma suggest the treatment can improve patient outcomes. (2020-12-10)

Microbes and plants: A dynamic duo
The unique partnership between root-dwelling microbes and the plants they inhabit can reduce drought stress. (2020-12-09)

Ancient alliance
''Happy families are all alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.'' So goes the first line of Leo Tolstoy's ''Anna Karenina.'' Little did the Russian novelist know his famous opening line would one day be used to describe microbial communities, their health and their relationships to their hosts. (2020-12-09)

Science paper links root endodermis and microbiota in mineral balance
Valéria Custódio, ITQB NOVA PhD Student and GREEN-IT member, is a co-author of the paper, which offers new insight on the importance of the relationship between microbiota and root endodermis. (2020-12-09)

How poor oral hygiene may result in metabolic syndrome
Researchers from TMDU identified a novel mechanism by which periodontal disease may cause metabolic syndrome. By studying patients with metabolic syndrome, the researchers demonstrated high antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis, the bacterium causing periodontal disease. In a mouse model, the researchers then showed that infection with this bacterium causes systemic insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle by altering the gut microbiome. This study shows the effect periodontal disease can have on the entire body. (2020-12-08)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

New cost-effective technique facilitates study of non-bacterial plant microbiomes
Thanks to a new technique developed by plant pathologists in Connecticut, scientists now have access to an affordable and effective tool to facilitate the study of the entire non-bacterial microbiomes of any plant species. (2020-12-08)

New definition of sustainability overcomes flaw hampering global transformation efforts
An interdisciplinary team led by Senior Researcher Dr. Christoph Rupprecht (FEAST Project, RIHN) has revealed a new definition of sustainability that expands the concept to non-human species and their needs. The new definition, published in Global Sustainability, addresses a critical flaw in the original concept of sustainability that was hindering global transformation efforts. Examples from landscape planning and the Healthy Urban Microbiome Initiative (HUMI) suggest the new multispecies sustainability concept will have wide-ranging applications. (2020-12-08)

Gut microbiome snapshot could reveal chemical exposures in children
Researchers have completed the most comprehensive study to date on how a class of persistent pollutants called semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are associated with the gut microbiome in human children. The results provide a potential mechanism for measuring exposure to a wide variety of these substances and suggests exposure to toxic halogenated compounds may create a niche for bacteria not usually found in the human gut. (2020-12-03)

Major depressive disorder may be defined by a distinct gut microbiome
Scientists have identified 3 bacteriophages, 47 bacterial species, and 50 fecal metabolites that were significantly more or less abundant in people with major depressive disorder (MDD) compared with healthy controls, according to a study in 311 individuals. The findings provide evidence that MDD may be characterized by gut microbiome disturbances. Jian Yang and (2020-12-02)

Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple, scientists say
In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals' guts are surprisingly complex environments - home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal's well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract. (2020-11-30)

Study reveals connection between gut bacteria and vitamin D levels
UC San Diego researchers discovered that the makeup of a person's gut microbiome is linked to their levels of active vitamin D, and revealed a new understanding of vitamin D and how it's typically measured. (2020-11-30)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.