Current Microcapsules News and Events

Current Microcapsules News and Events, Microcapsules News Articles.
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Biodegradable microcapsules deliver nerve growth factor to guide neuronal development
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues have demonstrated that nanoengineered biodegradable microcapsules can guide the development of hippocampal neurons in an in vitro experiment. The microcapsules deliver nerve growth factor, a peptide necessary for neuron growth. (2021-02-16)

Drug-delivery microcapsules tagged with zirconium-89 can be tracked by PET imaging
Polymer and radionuclide chemists report major advance in microcapsule drug delivery systems. Their microcapsules -- labeled with radioactive zirconium-89 -- are the first example of hollow polymer capsules capable of long-term, multiday positron emission tomography imaging in vivo. In previous work, the researchers showed that the hollow capsules could be filled with a potent dose of the cancer drug doxorubicin, which could then be released by therapeutic ultrasound that ruptures the microcapsules. (2021-01-20)

Still paying for broken smartphone display? Now, It is automatically fixed
Smartphone display repair cost that caused so many people to cry about, it may no longer be an issue to worry about. Research team in South Korea has developed a smartphone display material that can self-heal from damages. (2020-12-17)

Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage
Instead of using synthetic materials, Penn Medicine study shows magnets could be used to arrange cells to grow new tissues (2020-10-19)

Scientists develop new precise therapeutic leukemia vaccine
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University have developed a new type of precise therapeutic vaccine against leukemia. It utilizes self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules for co-encapsulating a new epitope peptide and PD-1 antibody. (2020-10-12)

Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell. The technique can be used to make microcapsules that respond to changes in pH, which are useful for applications such as anti-corrosion coatings. (2020-06-09)

Promising new method for producing tiny liquid capsules
Microcapsules for the storage and delivery of substances are tiny versions of the type of capsule used for fish oil or other liquid supplements. A new method for synthesizing microcapsules, reported in AIP Advances, creates microcapsules with a liquid core that are ideal for the storage and delivery of oil-based materials in skin care products. They also show promise in some applications as tiny bioreactors. In this new method, a surfactant-free microfluidics process is used. (2020-06-02)

Researchers develop high-performance cancer vaccine using novel microcapsules
Scientists from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a new therapeutic tumor vaccine based on self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules, which can efficiently activate the immune system and inhibit tumor development. (2020-05-22)

Novel tin 'bubbles' spur advances in the development of integrated chips
The use of extreme ultraviolet light sources in making advanced integrated chips has been considered, but their development has been hindered owing to a paucity of efficient laser targets. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) recently developed an extremely low-density tin 'bubble,' which makes the generation of extreme ultraviolet reliable and low cost. This novel technology paves the way for various applications in electronics and shows potential in biotechnology and cancer therapy. (2020-04-15)

Catalytic protocells get zingy
Artificial cells capable of oxygen gas production and chemical signalling have been prepared using a combination of synthetic and biological catalysts through an international collaboration between the University of Bristol and the University of Padua in Italy. (2020-01-08)

Microcapsules for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells
A team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University together with their colleagues developed a method of targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The discovery is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells and microcapsules made of polymeric compounds. The results were published in the Biomaterials Science journal. In the future the discovery may secure more precise treatment of tumors without causing damage to healthy tissues. (2019-12-09)

Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts
Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots. A new technique creates lopsided microcapsule 'shells' that can burst and release their cargo at much lower pressure, making them safer for use in the body. (2019-09-23)

Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. They showed that tiny pores on the surface of these capsules can act as ion channels. Their study will accelerate advances in artificial cell engineering and molecular robotics, as well as nanotechnology itself. (2019-09-18)

Making polyurethane degradable gives its components a second life
Polyurethane waste is piling up, but scientists have a possible solution: They have developed a method to make polyurethane degradable. Once the original product's useful life is over, the polymer can easily be dissolved into ingredients to make new products such as superglue. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-08-26)

Microrobots show promise for treating tumors
A pair of researchers in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science are working on an entirely new form of treatment --microrobots that can deliver drugs to specific spots inside the body while being monitored and controlled from outside the body. (2019-07-24)

A new system for treating type 1 diabetes mellitus
Thanks to an innovative system of magnetic microcapsule separation, the Nanobiocel-CIBER BNN research group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country in collaboration with the BIOMICS group, also of the UPV/EHU, has managed to reduce the volume of microcapsule implants containing insulin-producing pancreatic cells by nearly 80%. That way, the medical complications arising out of implanting large volumes of microcapsules are reduced and the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is improved. (2019-05-10)

Immune-repelling protein prolongs function, survival of human stem-cell-derived beta cells
Encapsulating human stem-cell-derived beta cells in microcapsules made with an immune-cell-repelling protein restored glucose metabolism in diabetic mice and protected the cells from immune system attack, preventing the buildup of fibrotic tissue that has plagued previous trials of encapsulated beta cells. (2019-03-26)

Pitt professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions
Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a tremendous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Research led by the University of Pittsburgh and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses microcapsule technology that may make post-combustion carbon capture cheaper, safer, and more efficient. (2018-12-12)

Protocell guests flee the nest
Researchers at the University of Bristol have shown that resident artificial cells abandon their protocell hosts by displaying antagonistic behavior on receiving a chemical signal. (2018-09-07)

Printing with sound
Harvard University researchers have developed a new printing technology that uses sound waves to control the size of liquid droplets independent of fluid viscosity. This approach could greatly broaden the types of liquids, including biopharmaceuticals, that can be printed drop-on-demand. The researchers used sound waves to generate a highly confined force at the tip of the printer nozzle, which pulls the droplet. The higher the amplitude of the sound waves, the smaller the droplet size. (2018-08-31)

A new kind of vaccine based on spider silk
In order to strengthen the efficacy of vaccines on the immune system -- and in particular on T lymphocytes, specialized in the detection of cancer cells -- researchers from the universities of Geneva, Freiburg, Munich, and Bayreuth, in collaboration with the German company AMSilk, have developed spider silk microcapsules capable of delivering the vaccine directly to the heart of immune cells. (2018-06-12)

Tiny drug-delivering capsules could sustain transplanted insulin-producing cells
A drug-carrying microsphere within a cell-bearing microcapsule could be the key to transplanting insulin-secreting pig pancreas cells into human patients whose own cells have been destroyed by type I diabetes. (2018-02-12)

Microcapsules gain a new power -- scavenging reactive oxygen species
Stable, biocompatible microcapsules have gained a new power -- the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This may aid microcapsule survival in the body as the tiny polymer capsules carry a drug or other biomolecules. The microcapsules may also find use in antioxidant therapy or in industrial applications where scavenging of free radicals is needed. (2018-01-30)

We have a quorum
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have utilized computational modeling to mimic such quorum sensing behavior in synthetic materials, which could lead to devices with the ability for self-recognition and self-regulation. (2017-07-25)

'Nano-in-micro' stem cell delivery could rescue blood flow after injury
When blood flow is reduced or cut to tissues, cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, which can lead to cell death if blood flow isn't efficiently restored. Stem cells are promising treatments, but they do not tend to stay at the site or survive long enough to heal the damage. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers combine micro and nano approaches to improve stem cell therapies and outcomes after ischemia, or inadequate blood supply. (2017-07-19)

UAB creates triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug delivery
Chemists have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing. These multilayer capsules show three traits that have been difficult to achieve in a single entity. They have good imaging contrast that allows detection with low-power ultrasound, they can stably and efficiently encapsulate the cancer drug doxorubicin, and both a low- and higher-power dose of ultrasound can trigger the release of that cargo. (2017-03-30)

Boost for groundbreaking research into self-healing construction materials
Science Minister, Jo Johnson, will meet with researcher Professor Bob Lark at Cardiff University today to learn about groundbreaking research into the development of self-healing concrete that could lead to huge savings in maintenance costs and greater protection for the UK's infrastructure. The project has today received fresh funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. (2017-03-17)

Magnetic stem cells for gene engineering
Russian and British scientists develop a technology to targeted deliver drugs to inflammation spot by magnet controlled stem cells. Native body cells joined magnetic microcapsules are very promising for cell therapy and gene engineering applications. (2016-12-28)

Researchers work to improve the lifecycle of materials
In a sweeping perspective article published this month in the journal Nature, a trio of Beckman researchers review the field they pioneered more than a decade-and-a-half ago and look at the future of autonomous polymers. (2016-12-14)

Self-healing materials for semi-dry conditions
Self-healing materials work very well if they are soft and wet, but research groups have found that the ability to self-repair diminishes as materials dry out. Scientists at Osaka University are beginning to bridge this gap with rigid materials that can repair 99 percent of a cut on the surface in semi-dry conditions. They present their prototypes, which are the first to combine physical and chemical approaches to self-healing, on Nov. 10 in Chem. (2016-11-10)

Technique mass-produces uniform, multilayered particles
In the latest issue of the journal Lab on a Chip, researchers from MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories report a new microencapsulation technique that yields particles of very consistent size, while also affording a high rate of production. (2016-10-05)

Shining a light on damage within polymers
When it comes to even the most advanced materials, the adage 'if it does not bend, it breaks' is often true. But before that final snap, most materials experience microscopic damage that could be fixed -- but only if you know it's there. In a study published in ACS Central Science, researchers introduce a new technique that detects and illuminates damage in various types of materials. (2016-08-17)

New method to identify microscopic failure
The Autonomous Materials Systems Group at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology has recently found a new way to identify microscopic damage in polymers and composite materials before total failure occurs. (2016-08-17)

Vortex rings may aid cell delivery, cell-free protein production
Cornell researchers have devised a method for producing toroid-shaped particles through a process called vortex ring freezing. The particles are mass produceable through inexpensive electrospraying. (2016-08-12)

Study of enzymatic chemical reactions may indicate how the first cells formed colonies
A novel investigation of how enzymatic reactions can direct the motion and organization of microcapsules may point toward a new theory of how protocells -- the earliest biological cells -- could have organized into colonies and thus, could have ultimately formed larger, differentiated structures. (2016-03-29)

Toward longer-lasting fragrances
Fragrances can be powerful. They can sooth or revitalize, evoke the forest or sea, and remind us of the past. To capture them, manufacturers infuse scents into products from toilet bowl cleaners to luxury perfumes. But once released from a bottle, fragrances evaporate quickly. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new way to encapsulate fragrance molecules to make a product's scent last. (2016-02-17)

Making the invisible visible: Color-changing indicators highlight microscopic damage
Damage developing in a material can be difficult to see until something breaks or fails. A new polymer damage indication system automatically highlights areas that are cracked, scratched or stressed, allowing engineers to address problem areas before they become more problematic. (2016-01-14)

Scientists present review of liposomes: A basis for drugs of the future
An international group of scientists, including Vladimir Chupin, head of the Biophysics Section at MIPT, and Vladimir Torchilin (Northeastern University, the USA), one of the world's leading experts in pharmacology, recently presented a review of liposomes, microscopic capsules widely used all over the world in the development of new drugs. Their review, published in the scientific journal Chemical Review, discusses the major achievements in the field and points to the most promising areas for its further development. (2015-08-10)

Preventing greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere
A novel class of materials that enable a safer, cheaper, and more energy-efficient process for removing greenhouse gas from power plant emissions has been developed by a multi-institution team of researchers. The approach could be an important advance in carbon capture and sequestration. (2015-02-05)

Sodium carbonate capsules used to capture carbon safely
The team developed a new type of carbon capture media composed of core-shell microcapsules, which consist of a highly permeable polymer shell and a fluid (made up of sodium carbonate solution) that reacts with and absorbs carbon dioxide. Sodium carbonate is typically known as the main ingredient in baking soda. The capsules keep the liquid contained inside the core, and allow the CO2 gas to pass back and forth through the capsule shell. (2015-02-05)

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