Current Microfabrication Techniques News and Events

Current Microfabrication Techniques News and Events, Microfabrication Techniques News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 12 | 459 Results
Innovation from Vienna: Ultrasound in the treatment of brain diseases
Ultrasound is not only used as an imaging technique but targeted pulses of ultrasound can be used as a highly accurate treatment for a range of brain diseases. A review jointly written by MedUni Vienna and the University of Toronto shows that the new treatments are already on the brink of broad clinical application. (2021-02-04)

New variety of paintbrush lily developed by a novel plant tissue culture technique
Scientists at Hokkaido University and Chiba University have developed simultaneous triploid and hexaploid varieties of Haemanthus albiflos by the application of endosperm culture, thus extending the use of this technique. (2021-01-22)

Could lab-grown plant tissue ease the environmental toll of logging and agriculture?
MIT researchers have proposed a method for growing plant-based materials, like wood and fiber, in a lab. The technology is still in early development but might one day help reduce the environmental footprint of some types of agriculture. (2021-01-21)

Newly developed GaN based MEMS resonator operates stably even at high temperature
JST PRESTO researcher developed a MEMS resonator that stably operates even under high temperatures by regulating the strain caused by the heat from gallium nitride (GaN). This device is small, highly sensitive and can be integrated with CMOS technology promising for the application to 5G communication, IoT timing device, on-vehicle applications, and advanced driver assistance system. (2021-01-15)

Wielding a laser beam deep inside the body
Robotic engineers led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Robert Wood, Ph.D., and postdoctoral fellow Peter York, Ph.D., at Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) have developed a laser-steering microrobot in a miniaturized 6x16 millimeter package that operates with high speed and precision, and can be integrated with existing endoscopic tools. (2021-01-13)

A full blood count of COVID-19 patients can predict disease severity
International research led by the Radboud university medical center shows that a full blood count of COVID-19 patients predicts fairly accurately whether the infection will have a complicated course or not. This makes it easier for healthcare providers to estimate the expected clinical picture. This study, conducted in eleven hospitals, has now been published in the scientific journal eLife. (2020-12-21)

Researchers deconstruct ancient Jewish parchment using multiple imaging techniques
Scientists in Romania used multiple, complementary imaging techniques to non-invasively study the composition of an aged Jewish parchment scroll. The various analyses can determine the types of materials used in the manuscript's manufacturing, providing historical context for objects of mysterious provenance. The research also offers insights into the item's degradation over time, including indications of previous repair attempts. All of this information helps conservators determine how best to restore such antiques to their original condition. (2020-12-18)

Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the activation of both sensors and human activity. (2020-11-30)

Perspectives of infrared spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of proteins
The present review describes the basic principle and the instrumentation of IR spectroscopy along with its advancements. Beyond this, various applications of this technique in determination of protein structure and quantification in different materials such as foods stuffs, biotechnological products and biological fluids have also been summarized. (2020-11-06)

Researchers shrink imaging spectrometer without compromising performance
Researchers have developed a new imaging spectrometer that is much lighter and smaller than state-of-the-art instruments while maintaining the same high level of performance. Because of its small size and modular design, the new instrument is poised to bring this advanced analytical technique to airborne vehicles and even planetary exploration missions. (2020-11-05)

New imaging technique doubles visibility of brain tumors in scans
A new three-dimensional imaging technique has been developed that greatly improves the visibility of brain tumors in magnetic resonance imaging scans. The technique will potentially enable earlier diagnosis of tumors when they are smaller and more treatable. (2020-10-28)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

Researchers create artificial lung to support pre-term babies in distress
An international team led by current and former McMaster University researchers has developed an artificial lung to support pre-term and other newborn babies in respiratory distress. (2020-09-29)

When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques
Researchers found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky negotiating techniques was dependent both on the humans' prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf. The findings stand in contrast to prior studies and show that when humans use intermediaries in the form of virtual agents, they feel more comfortable employing more deceptive techniques than they would normally use when negotiating for themselves. (2020-09-22)

New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material. Their fabrication method--which uses standard semiconductor fabrication processes--results in flexible single-crystal perovskite films with controlled area, thickness, and composition. (2020-07-29)

Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3D technology
Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3D printing. In the first known study of its kind, researchers took fragmented burnt human bones and tested the ability to make 3D models suitable to be shown to a jury in court. (2020-06-24)

'Different techniques needed' to detect fingermarks on new banknotes
Techniques used to detect fingermarks on traditional cotton banknotes are not effective on Scottish banks' new polymer notes and different methods are required, according to a study by University of Strathclyde researchers. (2020-06-03)

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane
SUTD developed the embedded ink writing (EIW) method, enabling the direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators. (2020-05-28)

New technique offers higher resolution molecular imaging and analysis
The new approach from Northwestern Engineering could help researchers understand more complicated biomolecular interactions and characterize cells and diseases at the single-molecule level. (2020-05-27)

Double helix of masonry -- Researchers discover the secret of Italian renaissance domes
University of Bergamo and Princeton University researchers found that the masonry of Italian renaissance domes, such as the duomo in Florence, use a double-helix structure that is self-supporting during and after construction. Their study is the first to quantitatively prove the forces at work in such masonry domes, which may lead to advances in modern drone construction techniques. (2020-05-18)

AI techniques in medical imaging may lead to incorrect diagnoses
Machine learning and AI are highly unstable in medical image reconstruction, and may lead to false positives and false negatives, a new study suggests. (2020-05-12)

UMBC gaming researchers develop a new way to render characters with realistic skin
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a new solution to render an essential detail in many video games: human skin. (2020-05-11)

Ultra-long-working-distance spectroscopy with 3D-printed aspherical microlenses
Researchers at the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw have demonstrated micrometre-sized 3D-printed aspherical microlenses which can replace bulky microscope objectives in spectroscopic measurements of single point-like light emitters (e.g. quantum dots or atomically thin 2D materials). The proposed microlenses increase the available working distance, i.e. the distance between the lens front and the sample surface, by over two orders of magnitude, and open up new perspectives for a wide class of optical experiments. (2020-05-07)

Getting groundbreaking medical technology out of the lab
New medical technologies hold immense promise for treating a range of conditions. Despite the pace of innovation in the medtech field, however, most discoveries never make it out of the laboratory. New research from EPFL could fast-track the route to clinical translation. (2020-03-16)

Study shows widely used machine learning methods don't work as claimed
Models and algorithms for analyzing complex networks are widely used in research and affect society at large through their applications in online social networks, search engines, and recommender systems. According to a new study, however, one widely used algorithmic approach for modeling these networks is fundamentally flawed, failing to capture important properties of real-world complex networks. (2020-03-16)

IVF-conceived children have somewhat higher mortality risk in their first weeks of life
Children conceived with assisted reproductive techniques including IVF have a somewhat higher mortality risk during their first weeks of life than children conceived naturally, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Fertility and Sterility. The researchers link the increased risk to a higher degree of premature births in IVF children and emphasize that the risk of infant mortality is still very small for both groups. (2020-02-18)

Memory boost with just one look
HRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have published results showing that targeted transcranial electrical stimulation during slow-wave sleep can improve metamemories of specific episodes by 20% after only one viewing of the episode, compared to controls. The same technology may offer a non-invasive treatment to mitigate bad memories that might cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Metamemory describes the sensitivity of whether memories are recalled accurately or not, such as during eyewitness testimony. (2020-01-14)

Skin-like sensors bring a human touch to wearable tech
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a super-stretchy, transparent and self-powering sensor that records the complex sensations of human skin. Dubbed artificial ionic skin -- or AISkin for short -- the researchers believe the innovative properties of AISkin could lead to future advancements in wearable electronics, personal health care and robotics. (2020-01-08)

Revealing the structure of axons
Recent studies have shown that under the axonal membrane, rings composed of actin filaments give the structure its flexibility. But those studies had not been able to define the precise architecture of these rings. By combining two microscopy techniques, optical and electronic, French researchers have now managed to observe these rings at the molecular scale. They are formed of long braided actin filaments, braided like a Christmas wreath. (2019-12-20)

Insects' drag-based flight mechanism could improve tiny flying robots
Thrips don't rely on lift in order to fly. Instead, the tiny insects rely on a drag-based flight mechanism, staying afloat in airflow velocities with a large ratio of force to wing size. Researchers have performed the first test of drag force on a thrip's wing under constant airflow in a bench-top wind tunnel and, drawing from microfabrication and nanomechanics, they created an experiment in which a thrip's wing was glued to a self-sensing microcantilever. (2019-12-10)

Electronics integrated to the muscle via 'Kirigami'
A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a donut-shaped kirigami device for electromyography (EMG) recordings. The proposed device reduces device displacement on a large deformable muscle surface. Accurate and robust EMG recordings offer EMG signal-based human-machine interfaces which allow prosthesis control for amputees. (2019-12-09)

Proton-hydrogen collision model could impact fusion research
A new study published in EPJ D uses new techniques to calculate the cross sections of atoms which have been excited to higher energy levels. They analysed the behaviour over a wide range of impact energies. (2019-12-09)

Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit. (2019-12-04)

New pads absorb shock better than foam with air flow and easy manufacture
HRL Laboratories has published test results showing shock-absorbing pads made from HRL's microlattice material had up to 27% higher energy absorption efficiency than the current best-performing expanded polystyrene foam when sustaining a single impact and up to 35% higher energy absorption efficiency than state-of-the-art vinyl nitrile foam when impacted repeatedly. Microlattice could replace current foams in protective packaging, shock isolators for electronics, vehicle interiors, and helmet padding from football to children's bicycle helmets. (2019-11-27)

Intraoral endoscopic thyroidectomy leaves no scar
A new study compares two surgical approaches to endoscopic thyroid removal, neither of which produces a scar in the neck area, providing a comprehensive comparison of the therapeutic effects and cosmetic results of each approach. (2019-10-29)

Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques
In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. They found that successive phases of modification to the building saw improvements, including higher quality raw materials, higher brick firing temperatures, and better ratios between carbonate and silicate building materials. (2019-10-25)

Ionic channels in carbon electrodes for efficient electrochemical energy storage
Development towards high-performance electrochemical energy storage devices has evoked our effort on novel carbon electrodes, as certain nanocarbons are perceived to own advantages such as high specific surface areas and controllable structure. Improved ionic dynamics and transport, significantly determined by ionic channels in carbons, is a prerequisite for efficient energy storage. Scientists in China and France summarize the latest advances in designing novel carbons and outline the promising features towards tailorable ionic channels. (2019-10-22)

EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. This new device could replace existing auditory brainstem implants, which have a number of shortcomings. (2019-10-16)

Researchers report a new way to produce curvy electronics
Contact lenses that can monitor your health as well as correct your eyesight aren't science fiction, but an efficient manufacturing method has remained elusive. Until now. Researchers have reported developing a new manufacturing method to produce the lenses, solar cells and other three-dimensional curvy electronics. (2019-09-25)

Science puts historical claims to the test
Two studies recently published in EPJ Plus show that today's analytical techniques are sufficiently advanced to differentiate between authentic historical artefacts and those that aren't quite what they seem. (2019-09-06)

Page 1 of 12 | 459 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.