Current Microfluidic News and Events

Current Microfluidic News and Events, Microfluidic News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 17 | 643 Results
Measuring hemoglobin levels with AI microscope, microfluidic chips
A complete blood count can help ascertain the health of a patient and typically includes an estimate of the hemoglobin concentration, which can indicate several conditions, including anemia, polycythemia, and pulmonary fibrosis. In AIP Advances, researchers describe a AI-powered imaging-based tool to estimate hemoglobin levels. The setup was developed in conjunction with a microfluidic chip and an AI-powered automated microscope that was designed for deriving the total as well as differential counts of blood cells. (2021-02-23)

Pioneering technique paves way for fast and cheap fabrication of rapid medical diagnostic tools
New technology developed by the University of Bristol has the potential to accelerate uptake and development of on-chip diagnostic techniques in parts of the world where rapid diagnoses are desperately needed to improve public health, mortality and morbidity. (2021-02-03)

UArizona researchers develop smartphone-based COVID-19 test
The team is adapting a smartphone-based method -- originally designed to detect the presence of norovirus -- for COVID-19 testing. (2021-01-29)

Scientists 'farm' natural killer cells in novel cancer fighting approach
Engineers and oncologists teamed to develop a microfluidic chip capable of capturing the body's natural killer immune cells to harvest their cancer-killing exosomes. (2021-01-28)

Carbon-chomping soil bacteria may pose hidden climate risk
Much of the earth's carbon is trapped in soil, and scientists have assumed that potential climate-warming compounds would safely stay there for centuries. But new research from Princeton University shows that carbon molecules can potentially escape the soil much faster than previously thought. The findings suggest a key role for some types of soil bacteria, which can produce enzymes that break down large carbon-based molecules and allow carbon dioxide to escape into the air. (2021-01-27)

Focusing on field analysis
One potential approach to developing a low-cost portable microscopy system is to use transparent microspheres in combination with affordable low-magnification objective lenses to increase image resolution and sensitivity. (2021-01-27)

Expanding the boundaries of CO2 fixation
Design and realization of synthetic enzymes open up an alternative to natural photorespiration (2021-01-09)

Surrey unveils breakthrough manufacturing process of ultra-thin sensor for smart contact lenses
Smart contact lenses could soon become mainstream thanks to a new manufacturing process that has allowed the University of Surrey to develop a multifunctional ultra-thin sensor layer. (2021-01-06)

Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack
To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays. (2020-11-30)

Scientists can now scoop contents of individual cells from their local environment
The new tool combines cell microscopy with the single-cell DNA and protein sequencing technology to enable connecting important information about the cell's physical features and its local environment to its molecular makeup. (2020-11-11)

NYUAD researchers develop protocol for a more accurate COVID-19 testing technique
Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Biology Program and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) have implemented a new three-step testing approach that promises to significantly - and cost-effectively -- improve testing accuracy. (2020-11-09)

Microfluidics helps MTU engineers watch viral infection in real time
Watching a viral infection happen in real time is like a cross between a zombie horror film, paint drying, and a Bollywood epic on repeat. Over a 10-hour span, chemical engineers from Michigan Tech watched viral infections happen with precision inside a microfluidics device and can measure when the infection cycle gets interrupted by an antiviral compound. (2020-11-02)

'Time machine' offers new pancreatic cancer drug testing approach
Drug resistance is a major reason why pancreatic cancer has a five-year survival rate of only about 10%. If scientists tested potential drugs on multiple tumor cell subtypes rather than on just one subtype, they may be able to catch resistance better, suggests a ''time machine'' developed by Purdue University engineers. (2020-10-29)

An artificial cell on a chip
Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a precisely controllable system for mimicking biochemical reaction cascades in cells. Using microfluidic technology, they produce miniature polymeric reaction containers equipped with the desired properties. This 'cell on a chip' is useful not only for studying processes in cells, but also for the development of new synthetic pathways for chemical applications or for biological active substances in medicine. (2020-10-28)

New approach to fighting cancer could reduce costs and side effects
CAR-T biotherapeutics company Carina Biotech and researchers at the University of South Australia have developed a novel approach based on microfluidic technology to ''purify'' the immune cells of patients in the fight against cancer. (2020-10-20)

Researchers 3D print unique micro-scale fluid channels used for medical testing
In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications. (2020-10-09)

Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations. (2020-09-16)

New microfluidic device minimizes loss of high value samples
A major collaborative effort that has been developing over the last three years between Arizona State University and European scientists, has resulted in a significant technical advance in X-ray crystallographic sample strategies. (2020-09-09)

Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
EPFL researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system. Their research, which has been published in Nature, should help save energy and further shrink the size of electronic components. (2020-09-09)

Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. However current testing methods are too inaccurate or too expensive to be feasible on a global scale. But now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a rapid, reliable and low-cost antibody test. (2020-09-08)

Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding. (2020-09-02)

Detecting small amounts of virus in early infections
Diagnostic devices that are used at home or in doctors' offices are often not sensitive enough to detect small amounts of a virus that might be present in samples from asymptomatic patients, which can occur in early stage COVID-19. In Biomicrofluidics, scientists report a membrane-based invention that can concentrate the virus content of a sample of urine or saliva, allowing it to be detected. (2020-09-01)

Study: Portable, point-of-care COVID-19 test could bypass the lab
As COVID-19 continues to spread, bottlenecks in supplies and laboratory personnel have led to long waiting times for results in some areas. In a new study, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign researchers have demonstrated a prototype of a rapid COVID-19 molecular test and a simple-to-use, portable instrument for reading the results with a smartphone in 30 minutes, which could enable point-of-care diagnosis without needing to send samples to a lab. (2020-08-31)

How cells solve mazes and traverse great distances through the body
Cells are particularly good at solving mazes, according to a new study, which demonstrates how they are able to navigate long and complicated routes through the body using self-generated chemoattractant gradients. (2020-08-27)

Microfluidic chip technology enables rapid multiplex diagnosis of plant viral diseases
Toyohashi University of Technology has applied a microfluidic chip technology to develop a multiplex genetic diagnostic device for the early detection and prevention of crop diseases. The group conducted a gene amplification experiment using cucumber viruses on the diagnostic device, and demonstrated that the rapid multiplex diagnosis can be performed within 1 hour. This diagnostic device is a highly versatile technology that can be used for genetic diagnosis in viral diseases of crops. (2020-08-21)

Exploring connections between ovarian cancer and blood cells
Recent discoveries made by researchers at Texas A&M University could change the way ovarian cancer is understood and treated. (2020-08-14)

New method to help spot gastric cancer cells
Researchers from the Shenyang Institute of Automation (SIA) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and City University of Hong Kong (CityU), in cooperation with doctors from the First Hospital of China Medical University, jointly proposed an optically induced electrokinetics (OEK) microfluidic method for label-free separation and characterization of gastric cancer cells. (2020-08-05)

Hyperactive immune cells accelerate heart valve disease: Study
Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of heart valve disease in the elderly and affects more than one in eight people aged over 75. Researchers used organ-on-a-chip technology to discover the disease is made worse by the damaging hyperactivity of immune cells, which are activated by the constant stress of squeezing through the narrow aortic valve. (2020-07-08)

Scientists use a Teflon pipe to make a cheap, simple reactor for silica particle synthesis
The synthesis of silica particles, used in bioimaging and drug delivery, could become considerably cheaper and more efficient by adopting a new flow synthesis method demonstrated by researchers in Australia and China, which involves a spiral channel and simple Teflon pipe to promote the rapid mixing of precursor fluids. (2020-07-01)

A novel sperm selection technology to increase success rates of in vitro fertilization
Motile sperm are difficult to collect with a conventional cell sorter because they are vulnerable to physical damage. A Japanese research collaboration has developed a technique using a cell sorter with microfluidic chip technology to reduce cell damage and improve in vitro fertilization rates. This research is expected to increase in vitro fertilization rates to improve production of experimental animals and livestock, and could be used as a fertility treatment in reproductive medicine. (2020-07-01)

Templating S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces revealed
A research team has provided the mechanistic insight into protein co-aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The templating mechanism of S100A9 amyloids on Aβ fibrillar surfaces during co-aggregation process was revealed by synergy of biophysical methods including charge detection mass spectrometry, microscopy, kinetic and microfluidic analyses. (2020-06-26)

Simple device monitors health using sweat
A device that monitors health conditions in the body using a person's sweat has been developed by Penn State and Xiangtan University researchers, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics, Penn State. (2020-06-23)

Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products
Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike. Within biofilms, bacteria are protected from chemicals and antibiotics and can be almost impossible to eliminate. But researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that enzymes produced by yeasts, called biosurfactants, can dissolve stubborn biofilms and boost the efficacy of current chemical treatments, lessening their toxicity and environmental impacts. (2020-06-22)

Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology. (2020-06-09)

Predicting cancer behavior requires better understanding of tumor cells
Our ability to predict who will get cancer, how patients will respond to treatment, or if patients will relapse is still quite limited, despite advances in the detection of genetic mutations and the establishment of risk factors; recently researchers were inspired to find new ways of looking at the problem. They report that using cellular mechanophenotyping, along with traditional methods such as immunostaining and genetic analysis, may provide a more comprehensive view of a tumor. (2020-06-09)

Paper-based device provides low-power, long-term method for analyzing sweat
Researchers at North Carolina State University have constructed a paper-based device as a model of wearables that can collect, transport and analyze sweat in next-generation wearable technology. Using a process known as capillary action, akin to water transport in plants, the device uses evaporation to wick fluid that mimics the features of human sweat to a sensor for up to 10 days or longer. They discuss their work in the journal Biomicrofluidics. (2020-06-09)

With faster cell modeling towards the vaccine and cure for COVID-19
Researchers from the Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering 'Giulio Natta' of the Politecnico di Milano and the Pediatric Research Center, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences 'L. Sacco ', University of Milan have recently published an article in the scientific journal Theranostics, which will help the international scientific community to understand the mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and to develop vaccines and therapeutic agents against COVID-19. (2020-06-04)

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane
SUTD developed the embedded ink writing (EIW) method, enabling the direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators. (2020-05-28)

Unique insight into development of the human brain: Model of the early embryonic brain
Stem cell researchers from the University of Copenhagen have designed a model of an early embryonic brain. The model will increase our understanding of how the human brain develops and can thereby help to accelerate the development of stem cell treatments for brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and dementia. (2020-05-25)

Cell-culture based test systems for anticancer drug screening
As we know, a malignant tumor is a complex system of mutated cells which constantly interacts with and involves healthy cells in the body. This specificity of malignant neoplasms greatly complicates the process of therapy, since the tumor quickly becomes resistant to chemotherapy drugs. Thus, there is a growing demand not only for new drugs, but also for new in vitro test systems that take into account the maximum possible number of tumor characteristics. (2020-05-21)

Page 1 of 17 | 643 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.