Current Microorganism News and Events

Current Microorganism News and Events, Microorganism News Articles.
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Seeds transfer their microbes to the next generation
Scientists have been pondering if the microbiome of plants is due to nature or nurture. Research at Stockholm University, published in Environmental Microbiology, showed that oak acorns contain a large diversity of microbes, and that oak seedlings inherit their microbiome from these acorns. The microorganisms found on the seed are often valuable for the plant, promoting its growth and protecting it against certain diseases. Each plant species harbours a distinct microbial community. (2021-01-21)

Immediate detection of airborne viruses with a disposable kit!
The KIST-GIST collaborative research team developed an integrated sampling/monitoring platform that uses a disposable kit to easily collect and detect airborne viruses on-site. The disposable virus sampling/monitoring kit developed by the team is similar to the pregnancy test kit, and enables completion of both sampling and diagnosing on airborne viruses within 50 minutes on-site (10 to 30 minutes of sampling and 20 minutes of diagnosis) without requiring a separate cleaning or separation process. (2020-12-10)

Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Dr. Sun-Mi Lee and her team at the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) have announced that they have developed a novel microorganism capable of producing biodiesel precursors from lignocellulosic biomass such as discarded agricultural by-products, waste paper, and cardboard boxes. This microorganism has achieved the product yield twice of what was obtainable from its predecessors. (2020-11-30)

Dairy cows exposed to heavy metals worsen antibiotic-resistant pathogen crisis
Dairy cows, exposed for a few years to drinking water contaminated with heavy metals, carry more pathogens loaded with antimicrobial-resistance genes able to tolerate and survive various antibiotics. That's the finding of a team of researchers that conducted a study of two dairy herds in Brazil four years after a dam holding mining waste ruptured, and it spotlights a threat to human health, the researchers contend. (2020-11-16)

New study defines life cycle of a destructive plant pathogen 142 years after its discovery
''Using confocal and electron microscopic imaging, we provide compelling evidence to support the proposed life cycle of P. brassicae, making it more convincing and acceptable to the community,'' explained Liu. ''Notably, and most surprisingly, we discovered the existence of a sexual life stage of P. brassicae, starting from the fusion of two secondary zoospores within the infected epidermal cells.'' (2020-11-09)

A RUDN University biologist described how a harmless bacterium turns into a phytopathogen
A researcher from RUDN University suggested that Xanthomonas bacteria that are harmful to plants might have developed from a nonpathogenic related species by receiving virulence genes from other species of bacteria. (2020-10-03)

Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products. Scientists from EPFL, the University of Cambridge, and the Bern University of Applied Sciences have developed a platform that combines different microorganisms that can make a dramatic difference. (2020-08-27)

Tag team gut bacteria worsen symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) have discovered that a particular combination of microorganisms in the gut can worsen symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. The study published in the scientific journal Nature shows that two specific gut bacteria enhance the activity of immune cells that attack the body's own brain and spinal cord. (2020-08-26)

Less flocking behavior among microorganisms reduces the risk of being eaten
When algae and bacteria with different swimming gaits gather in large groups, their flocking behaviour diminishes, something that may reduce the risk of falling victim to aquatic predators. This finding is presented in an international study led from Lund University in Sweden. (2020-08-24)

Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests. (2020-07-23)

New study resolves mystery surrounding unique light-harvesting structures in algae
Photosynthesis is a biochemical process that converts solar energy into chemical energy, releasing oxygen into the atmosphere. This process is highly complex and requires various combinations of proteins that work in tandem. However, details regarding the structures of these molecules in some organisms have remained poorly understood. Now, scientists in Japan have shed light on the structural complexes that drive photosynthesis in an aquatic microorganism, which could fuel the development of novel solar devices. (2020-07-06)

Fish farming alters microbial communities, and reduces nitrate levels in pond ecosystems
The N and P fractions and water environmental factors influenced the microbial community structure and diversity in pond ecosystems. Fish farming indirectly affected the microbial community by altering the contents of N and P fractions in water bodies of ponds when a natural pond was converted to a managed fish pond. (2020-06-22)

Charting metabolic maps in the pursuit of new vaccines and antimicrobials
Researchers have made maps of the metabolic pathways of M. agalactiae and M. pneumoniae, two common bacteria that infect livestock and humans respectively. The results may accelerate the discovery of new vaccines and antimicrobial treatments. The research group will also use the maps to finetune an engineered version of M. pneumoniae so that it can treat human lung diseases in the future. (2020-06-02)

MIPT scientists explain why new dangerous viruses are so hard to identify
In response to the rapid spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, an authoritative global scientific journal, aptly named Viruses, published a fundamental review of problems related to identifying and studying emerging pathogens, such as the notorious coronavirus. (2020-03-25)

Bacteria loop-the-loop
The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus swims with the help of two bundles of flagella, which are thread-like structures. This bacterium possesses a sort of intracellular 'compass needle' and their movements can be controlled using a magnetic field. So they can be used as a biological model for microrobots. An international team with participation from the University of Göttingen has investigated how these bacteria move and determined their swimming speed. The results were published in the journal eLife. (2020-02-27)

Bacterium makes complex loops
A scientific team from the Biosciences and Biotechnology Institute of Aix-Marseille in Saint-Paul lez Durance, in collaboration with researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and the University of Göttingen, determined the trajectory and swimming speed of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus, known to move rapidly. (2020-02-27)

A response key for survival of Mycoplasma genitalium in the urogenital tract uncovered
A study led by an IBB-UAB research team has managed to identify the mechanisms by which the sexually transmitted bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mge) can persist in conditions with very limited availability of metals, a circumstance it must face when infecting humans. The discovery will facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies that could block the metal uptake and transport systems of this pathogen, which affects the urogenital tract and is becoming resistant to antibiotics. (2020-01-08)

Meteorite-loving microorganism
The archaeon Metallosphaera sedula can uptake and process extraterrestrial material. This is shown by an international team led by astrobiologist Tetyana Milojevic, who examines microbial fingerprints on meteorite materials. The researchers also conclude that M. sedula colonizes meteorite minerals faster than those of terrestrial origin. The results appear in Scientific Reports. (2019-12-03)

The 'Signal Cell' relaying microbiota signals discovered
Prof. Seung-Woo Lee and his research team from POSTECH revealed the microbiota signal mechanism. (2019-11-25)

Solution of the high-resolution crystal structure of stress proteins from Staphylococcus
One of the main factors favoring a microorganism's survival in extreme conditions is preserving ribosomes -- a macromolecular complex comprising RNA and proteins (2019-11-06)

Risk of heart valve infections rising in hospitals
People with heart disease or defective or artificial heart valves are at increased risk of developing a potentially deadly valve infection. Rutgers researchers reported that new risk factors for this condition have emerged and that an increasing number of patients admitted to hospitals for other diseases are at risk of contracting this potentially lethal cardiac infection. (2019-09-29)

Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever
Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. Supplementing people's diets with iron in places where both iron deficiency anemia and dengue fever are a problem could potentially limit transmission of the disease, but there are risks. (2019-09-16)

Methane-producing microorganism makes a meal of iron
A new understanding of how a microorganism produces methane and carbon dioxide could eventually allow researchers to manipulate how much of these important greenhouse gases escape into the atmosphere. (2019-09-04)

Arctic permafrost melting will aggravate the greenhouse effect
Scientists from Russia and the United States studied the composition of the deep layers of permafrost in Eastern Siberia to better understand the hazards of permafrost thawing to our planet and its inhabitants. Their findings suggest that the release of organic matter from permafrost will intensify the greenhouse effect. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. (2019-08-27)

RTS,S vaccine could favor the acquisition of natural immunity against malaria
The RTS,S malaria vaccine could enhance the production of protective antibodies upon subsequent parasite infection, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results, published in BMC Medicine, identify the antigens (or protein fragments) that could be included in future, more effective multivalent vaccines. (2019-08-13)

Tungsten as interstellar radiation shielding?
A boiling point of 5900 degrees Celsius and diamond-like hardness in combination with carbon: tungsten is the heaviest metal, yet has biological functions - especially in heat-loving microorganisms. A team led by Tetyana Milojevic at the University of Vienna report for the first time rare microbial-tungsten interactions at the nanometer range. Based on these findings, also the survivability of microorganisms in outer space conditions can be investigated. The results appeared in Frontiers in Microbiology. (2019-07-09)

Parasitology -- On filaments and fountains
Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite that is responsible for toxoplasmosis, utilizes at least two modes of locomotion during its infection cycle. (2019-07-02)

New microorganism for algae biomass to produce alternative fuels
Professor Gyoo Yeol Jung and his research team utilized algae that grow three times faster than starch crops and succeeded in producing biofuel and biochemicals. They developed a new artificial microorganism as a microbial platform for the biorefinery of brown macroalgae which is possible to accelerate biochemical production rate. (2019-06-11)

Fleming's method in miniature
Scientists in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel have developed a method with which they can quickly test a very large number of molecules for antibiotic effect. With it, they have already successfully discovered new antibiotic candidates produced by microorganisms. In the future, they will use their new technology to examine soil samples and the microbiome on human skin for medically useful microorganisms. (2019-04-29)

Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems
A research team at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms. The method allows movable structures to be formed in a microchannel and harnessed to Vorticella. The biohybrid system demonstrates the conversion of motion from linear motion to rotation. These fundamental technologies help researchers to create wearable smart microsystems by using autonomous microorganisms. (2019-04-12)

High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)

Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms. The study is by Liya Lomsadze and colleagues from Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y., United States. (2019-04-12)

Study suggests the majority of tourniquets used in medical procedures are contaminated
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that a majority of tourniquets inspected contained microbes which could put patient safety and care quality at risk. (2019-04-11)

Infection biology: What makes Helicobacter so adaptable?
The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori owes its worldwide distribution to its genetic adaptability. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich microbiologists have identified an enzyme that plays a vital role in the flexible control of global gene expression in the species. (2019-02-12)

Measuring forces of living cells and microorganisms
Novel technique to measure forces produced by microorganisms as they move without harming them hopes to shine light on how bacteria move. (2019-01-28)

Scientists use microorganism to fabricate functional bacterial cellulose in situ
A research team led by Prof. XIAN Mo and ZHANG Haibo from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new method to use microorganism to fabricate functional bacterial cellulose in situ. (2019-01-28)

Study of archaeal cells could teach us more about ourselves
Researchers wanted to better understand the archaeal cell by studying Sulfolobus islandicus, an archaeal microorganism that is found in geothermal hot springs. Their results give insight into archaea's potential shared ancestry with eukaryotes and the evolutionary history of cells, while overturning previously held beliefs about what S. islandicus requires for growth. (2019-01-24)

The persistence of pesticides threatens European soils
A study developed by researchers from the Diverfarming project finds pesticide residues in the soils of eleven European countries in six different cropping systems (2018-11-26)

Creating rings in natural antibiotic synthesis
Scientists at the University of Bristol have revealed the secrets of the key ring forming cascade in the biosynthesis of a globally used antibiotic. They hope their findings could lead to the development of antibiotics with improved properties and new biocatalysts for the clean and efficient synthesis of medicinally important molecules. (2018-11-26)

Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found. (2018-11-08)

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