Current Microscopy News and Events

Current Microscopy News and Events, Microscopy News Articles.
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Electrons caught in the act
Tsukuba University scientists create movies of the ultrafast motion of electrons traveling through an organic semiconductor with atomic-level resolution. This work may lead to more powerful and miniaturized smart devices. (2021-01-21)

Adaptive optics with cascading corrective elements
As reported in Advanced Photonics, researchers from the University of Freiburg, Germany, have made a significant advance in AO microscopy through the demonstration of a new AO module comprising two deformable phase plates (DPPs). (2021-01-21)

Researchers resolve controversy over energy gap of Van der Waals material
Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements revealed that the energy gap of chromium tribromide is around 0.3 electron volt (eV), which is much smaller than optical measurements, which ranged from 1.68 to 2.1 eV. (2021-01-15)

GridTape: An automated electron microscopy platform
Scientists have developed an automated, faster, and more rapid electron microscopy technique, called GridTape, that enables them to label and read the location of every neuron in a tissue sample. The team used GridTape to map the circuity of the spinal cord nerve of the fruit fly. The technique not only provides a comprehensive map of neuronal circuits; it can also be used to study nerve circuitry in larger animal systems. (2021-01-11)

Singapore and US scientists uncover the structure of Wnt, Wntless proteins
Preventing Wnt from hitching a ride may offer new avenue for novel treatments for cancer and fibrosis. (2021-01-11)

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories
Factor-pooling by ribosomes caught on video using state-of-art high-speed atomic force microscopy technology. (2021-01-08)

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers
Reactive molecules, such as free radicals, can be produced in the body after exposure to certain environments or substances and go on to cause cell damage. Antioxidants can minimize this damage by interacting with the radicals before they affect cells. (2021-01-08)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

New imaging method reveals if antibiotics reach bacteria hiding in tissues
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Western Australia have developed a new imaging method to see where antibiotics have reached bacteria within tissues. The method could be used to help develop more effective antibiotic treatments, reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-05)

Comb of a lifetime: a new method for fluorescence microscopy
Conventional fluorescence microscopy provides poor quantitative information of the sample because it only captures fluorescence intensity, which changes frequently and depends on external factors. Now, scientists from Japan have developed a new fluorescence microscopy technique to measure both fluorescence intensity and lifetime. Their method does not require mechanical scanning of a focal point; instead, it produces images from all points in the sample simultaneously, enabling a more quantitative study of dynamic biological and chemical processes. (2021-01-01)

Sugars influence cell-to-surface adhesion
An international team of researchers examined how movement and adhesion in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be manipulated. To this end, the researchers altered the sugar modifications in proteins on the cell surface. As a result, the so-called adhesion force was also altered. The results have now been published in the open access scientific journal eLife. (2020-12-29)

High-speed atomic force microscopy takes on intrinsically disordered proteins
Kanazawa University's pioneering high-speed atomic force microscope technology has now shed light on the structure and dynamics of some of life's most ubiquitous and inscrutable molecules - intrinsically disordered proteins. The study is reported in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-12-28)

Experiment takes 'snapshots' of light, stops light, uses light to change properties of matter
The team generated a movie of how light waves churn on their nanometer wavelength scale by imaging electrons that two light photons coming together cause to emit from the surface. (2020-12-23)

New electron microscopy technique offers first look at previously hidden processes
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of 'smart' materials being formed at the nanoscale. (2020-12-22)

Development of plaques in Alzheimer's disease resolved
In Alzheimer's disease patients, the protein amyloid-beta (Aβ) clumps up in the brain to form so-called fibrils. This has a toxic effect on the surrounding nerve cells. It is believed that immune cells compact the Aβ fibrils into what are known as plaques. It is now possible to track the development of these microscopically small structures in human using infrared microscopy. (2020-12-21)

CNIO and IRB Barcelona assemble the gamma-tubulin ring complex in vitro for the first time
This work paves the way for the in vitro study of the nucleation process that is essential for assembly and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The paper is a collaboration between Jens Lüders' group at IRB Barcelona and Oscar Llorca's at CNIO. The results have been published in Science Advances. (2020-12-21)

Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research. (2020-12-21)

Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. A team led by University of Göttingen used innovative molecular biological methods and traditional microscopy to investigate the pollen collecting behaviour of honey bees and bum-ble bees in agricultural landscapes. It turns out bumble bees take much more pollen from different plant species than honey bees to satisfy their need for protein. (2020-12-21)

New phase for synthetic aperture microscopy
Although SAM is undoubtedly a promising approach, current implementations lack in both spatial resolution and frame rate to be useful for emerging applications. To address these issues, a team of researchers led by Renjie Zhou from The Chinese University of Hong Kong recently developed a novel SAM method. (2020-12-21)

Flexible and powerful electronics
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba has developed a method for optimizing the electrical properties of carbon-based conductors by turning them into an ionic gel. This work may open the way for cheap, highly efficient sensors that can be printed on flexible surfaces. (2020-12-16)

New approach reveals structure and function of individual synapses
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience report the results of a novel approach that allowed them to achieve direct measurements of the activity of individual synapses, their size, and their neuron's output signal. Their work challenges predictions of the Hebbian model, demonstrating that synapse size is not correlated with response similarity and suggests neural response properties reflect the total number of active synapses, both weak and strong. (2020-12-16)

Record resolution in X-ray microscopy
Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and other institutions in Paris, Hamburg and Basel, have succeeded in setting a new record in X-ray microscopy. With improved diffractive lenses and more precise sample positioning, they were able to achieve spatial resolution in the single-digit nanometre scale. (2020-12-11)

Scientists invent a new type of microscope that can see through an intact skull
Researchers at IBS invented a new type of microscope called reflective matrix microscope, which uses adaptive optics techniques (2020-12-02)

Reconstruction of eye tissue gives new insight into outer retina
Researchers used a newly developed imaging technique called serial block face scanning electron microscopy, to produce a digital reconstruction of eye tissues from the outer retina, at very high resolution. This is the first time this technology has been used to fully reconstruct cells from the retina and could provide new insights into the causes of irreversible blinding diseases. (2020-12-02)

Cell membranes in super resolution
For the first time ever, expansion microscopy allows the imaging of even the finest details of cell membranes. This offers new insights into bacterial and viral infection processes. (2020-12-02)

Raman holography
Scientists from ICFO and University Rovira i Virgili report on a novel Raman holographic technique capable of tracking individual particles in 3D volumes from one single image. (2020-11-30)

Game changer in thermoelectric materials could unlock body-heat powered personal devices
A breakthrough improvement in ultra?efficient thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat into electricity and vice versa, has great potential for applications ranging from low-maintenance, solid-state refrigeration to compact, zero-carbon power generation--possibly including small, personal devices powered by the body's own heat. Heat 'harvesting' takes advantage of the free, plentiful heat sources provided by body heat, automobiles, everyday living, and industrial process. (2020-11-28)

Perfect imperfection: Electrode defects boost resistive memory efficiency
Resistive switching memory devices offer several advantages over the currently used computer memory technology. Researchers from the MIPT Atomic Layer Deposition Lab have joined forces with colleagues from Korea to study the impact of electrode surface morphology on the properties of a resistive switching memory cell. It turned out that thicker electrodes have greater surface roughness and are associated with markedly better memory cell characteristics (2020-11-23)

Altered 'coat' disguises fatal brain virus from neutralizing antibodies
A genetic modification in the 'coat' of a brain infection-causing virus may allow it to escape antibodies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say testing people for this and other viral mutations may help identify patients at risk for developing a fatal brain disease. (2020-11-20)

Gold nanoparticles turn the spotlight on drug candidates in cells
A team including researchers from Osaka University has developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy technique for tracking small molecules in live cells. The technique uses gold nanoparticles to boost the signal from alkyne group tags attached to the molecules. The alkyne group has a minimal effect on the drug molecule behavior and provides a signal that can be easily distinguished from the cell background. Their technique is expected to be useful in drug discovery. (2020-11-18)

Super-resolution "street view" microscopy hits the SPOT
An advanced technique called SPOT is giving researchers a opportunities to study the sophisticated world of lipid dynamics within cells. (2020-11-18)

Ultracompact metalens microscopy breaks FOV constraints
As reported in Advanced Photonics, their metalens-integrated imaging device (MIID) exhibits an ultracompact architecture with a working imaging distance in the hundreds of micrometers. Using a simple image-stitching process, they are able to obtain wide-field microscope imaging with large FOV and high resolution. (2020-11-13)

C4 rice's first wobbly steps towards reality
An international long-term research collaboration aimed at creating high yielding and water use efficient rice varieties, has successfully installed part of the photosynthetic machinery from maize into rice. (2020-11-12)

Scientists snap molecular building blocks of brain computing
A new technique for image processing helps scientists observe building blocks of brain computing--synapses. They deciphered organization of certain proteins, which endows the brain to process information. (2020-11-08)

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces
Researchers at Kyushu University have demonstrated that placing cells on a plasmonic metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticle can improve the resolution of images of living cells taken in real-time under a widefield fluorescence microscope. The metasurface effectively confines light emission from parts of the cell near the metasurface to a nano-thickness plane, providing a simple method to improving both axial and lateral resolution. (2020-11-06)

Revealing the identity of the last unknown protein of autophagy
Japanese scientists discovered that Atg9, one of the proteins that function to mediate autophagy, has phospholipid-translocation activity (the lipid scramblase activity) between the two layers of the lipid bilayer?and elucidated that the protein's activity brings about autophagosome membrane expansion. The artificial control of autophagy is expected to promote the research and development of treating and preventing various diseases. (2020-11-04)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

Stronger treatments could cure Chagas disease
Researchers in the University of Georgia's Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases have found that a more intensive, less frequent drug regimen with currently available therapeutics could cure the infection that causes Chagas disease (2020-10-29)

Graphdiyne based metal atomic catalyst for efficient ammonia synthesis
Researchers cleverly used the rich chemical bonds, highly conjugated large π bonds, super-large surface and pore structures of graphdiyne. The graphdiyne-based zero-valent palladium atom catalyst was efficiently and controllably designed and synthesized through a simple and efficient metal ion anchoring-electron transfer - self-reduction strategy. (2020-10-28)

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