Current Migrants News and Events

Current Migrants News and Events, Migrants News Articles.
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How women, migrants and workers are represented in the German Bundestag
Political scientists from the universities of Konstanz, Basel, Geneva and Stuttgart examine how members of the German Bundestag who belong to disadvantaged groups advocate for their interests (2021-02-23)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

How the spread of the internet is changing migration
The spread of the Internet is shaping migration in profound ways. A McGill-led study of over 150 countries links Internet penetration with migration intentions and behaviours, suggesting that digital connectivity plays a key role in migration decisions and actively supports the migration process. (2020-12-16)

Less light, more trees assist migrating birds
Scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Colorado State University used observations from the Lab's eBird citizen-science program to estimate the seasonal species richness of nocturnally migrating passerines within 333 well surveyed urban areas in the contiguous U.S. ''Richness'' is defined as the number of different species in an area. (2020-12-09)

Migrating animals 'live fast and die young'
Animals that migrate 'live fast and die young', new research shows. (2020-11-17)

ICE detention centers saw sustained outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, says study
More than a dozen US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers experienced large, repeated outbreaks of vaccine-preventable illnesses in the last three years, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2020-10-29)

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study carried out at the University of Geneva reveals that people who support immigration are ready and willing to adopt an empathetic approach and a wider perspective. By contrast, when opponents of immigration are asked to engage in perspective taking, they feel more competition with their ''adversary.'' (2020-10-14)

Mapping out rest stops for migrating birds
A team of researchers have developed a new metric called the stopover-to-passage ratio that can help determine if a majority of birds are flying over a particular site or stopping at the site to refuel or rest. The answer to this question can have important implications for what action is ultimately taken on the ground to help migratory birds. (2020-10-14)

Tighter border policies leave migrants vulnerable to effects of climate change
New Princeton University research suggests that restrictive border policies could increase many people's vulnerability to extreme climate conditions and weaken economic prosperity by limiting their ability to emigrate from countries that are facing worsening conditions due to climate change, such as drought, heat waves, and rising seas. (2020-10-12)

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (2020-09-22)

Cannabis farms are a modern slavery 'blind spot' for UK police, study suggests
Migrants arrested for tending plants in the flats, houses and attics where cannabis is grown in bulk are often victims of trafficking and ''debt bondage'' - yet many are not recognised as such by police, according to a new study. (2020-09-15)

Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species -- for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur -- predict their vulnerability to extreme weather? (2020-08-21)

Changes in climate and land cover affecting European migratory bird populations
Changes in climate and habitat on the breeding and non-breeding grounds of migratory birds are both playing an important part in driving their long-term population changes. (2020-08-14)

Three-quarters of migrants traveling to US through Mexico experience food insecurity
A survey of Central American migrants traveling through Mexico on their way to the United States found that 74 percent of them experienced a degree of food insecurity, ranging from having only one meal to no food at all for one day or longer. Factors associated with more severe food insecurity include more days in active transit, and the experience of illness by the migrant or their travel companion. (2020-08-05)

Shifts seen in breeding times and duration for 73 boreal bird species over 40 years
In a new study out this week, a team including forest ecologist Malcolm Itter at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports finding ''clear evidence of a contraction of the breeding period'' among boreal birds in Finland over a 43-year span for which good quality data were available. (2020-07-23)

If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. The study focuses specifically on parks in New York City. It uses observations submitted to the eBird citizen-science database from 2002 through 2019 to estimate the variety of species found on an annual and seasonal basis. (2020-07-20)

Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (2020-07-13)

You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered. (2020-06-08)

New Visa restrictions will make the US economic downturn worse
Research on visa restrictions designed to help American graduates seeking jobs during the pandemic-fueled economic downturn are likely to further hurt the economy, according to new UC San Diego research on immigrant rights. (2020-06-03)

Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world's first cities
Scientists analyzed DNA data from 110 skeletal remains in West Asia dated 3,000 to 7,500 years ago. The study reveals how a high level of human movement in West Asia during the Neolithic to late Bronze Age not only led to the spread of ideas and material culture but to a more genetically connected society well before the rise of cities, not the other way around, as previously thought. (2020-05-28)

Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort. (2020-05-26)

Warming climate is changing where birds breed
Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. But a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that those birds in your backyard may be changing right along with the climate. (2020-05-26)

7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris)1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago. (2020-05-25)

Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
Biologists how different oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of California and the Baja California Peninsula influenced formation of new species of sharks and rays. (2020-05-19)

COVID-19: Hospital response risks worsening health inequalities
Disadvantaged and marginalized people face worsening health inequalities as a result of the difficult choices made by NHS hospitals in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Public health doctors, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, say that the restriction of non-urgent clinical services, such as gynecology, sexual health and pediatrics, and the precipitous decline in emergency department attendances, will affect marginalized groups, disproportionately. (2020-05-14)

NHS charging rules for non-residents 'unworkable' and harming wider UK health system
The current NHS regulations for charging those not ordinarily resident in the UK for treatment, such as migrants and short term visitors, are 'unworkable' and harmful to the wider health system, concludes an analysis of survey responses, published in BMJ Paediatrics Open. (2020-04-21)

Restrictive healthcare policies associated with delayed TB diagnosis and treatment
The introduction of policies that restrict healthcare access for visitors and migrants not entitled to free NHS care may be associated with delays in diagnosis and treatment for patients with tuberculosis (TB) who were not born in the UK, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of an infectious disease like TB may increase morbidity and mortality for infected individuals, as well as transmission in the community. (2020-04-20)

Life in refugee camps wreaks havoc on children's health
Children's health declines the longer they live in refugee camps. Many adults are also struggling, with seven out of ten feeling like they have no future. (2020-04-08)

COVID-19 in humanitarian settings and lessons learned from past epidemics
A new paper, ;COVID-19 in Humanitarian Settings and Lessons Learned from Past Epidemics' published in Nature Medicine, invokes a global response to protect the most vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-08)

In South Africa, three hominins, including earliest Homo erectus, lived during same period
Nearly 2 million years ago, three hominin genera -- Australopithecus, Paranthropus and the earliest Homo erectus lineage -- lived as contemporaries in the karst landscape of what is now South Africa, according to a new geochronological evaluation of the hominin fossil-rich Drimolen Paleocave complex. (2020-04-02)

Can migration, workforce participation, and education balance the cost of aging in Europe?
New IIASA research shows that higher levels of education and increasing workforce participation in both migrant and local populations are needed to compensate for the negative economic impacts of aging populations in EU countries. (2020-03-23)

'Blind over-reliance' on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights
Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns. (2020-03-17)

New guideline provides pathway to end homelessness, with housing as the foundation
A collaborative approach is required to build health care pathways that will end homelessness in Canada. Clinicians can play a role by tailoring their interventions using a comprehensive new clinical guideline on homelessness published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-03-09)

A PLOS Medicine special issue devoted to refugee and migrant health
This week, the open-access journal PLOS Medicine launches its latest special issue, focused on research and commentary about the health of refugees and migrants. (2020-03-03)

Journal maps intersection of immigration and aging
A new special issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America explores how contemporary trends in immigration, migration, and refugee movement affect how people age and how societies care for aging people. (2020-02-26)

Fifty years of data show new changes in bird migration
A growing body of research shows that birds' spring migration has been getting earlier and earlier in recent decades. New research from The Auk: Ornithological Advances on Black-throated Blue Warblers, a common songbird that migrates from Canada and the eastern US to Central America and back every year, uses fifty years of bird-banding data to add another piece to the puzzle, showing that little-studied fall migration patterns have been shifting over time as well. (2020-02-20)

Old Irish 'clachan' found in South Australia
The oldest known Australian example of a communal type of Irish settlement has been 'unearthed' in a dusty paddock in rural South Australia. An extensive geophysical study of the Baker's Flat Irish settlement site near Kapunda has found the first -- and possibly largest -- clachan in Australia, says Flinders archaeologist Susan Arthure. (2020-02-16)

Build it and they will come
Migration, both domestic and abroad, is playing a major role in transforming the world's largest cities, and Moscow is no exception. Researchers at HSE University, the Institute of Geography of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IGRAN) and Strelka KB identified which cities' residents are buying newly built apartments in the capital and how economic inequality between Russia's regions is changing the face of the city. (2020-02-07)

Majority-minority social-group contact proves negative for the latter
The study, in which the University of Granada participated, was published recently by the journal Nature Human Behavior. It highlights that, contrary to what was previously thought, among minority groups this contact appears to be negatively related to support for social change toward greater equality. (2020-02-06)

Infectious disease experts warn of outbreak risks in US border detention centers
Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the US Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks. (2020-01-29)

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