Current Mitochondria News and Events

Current Mitochondria News and Events, Mitochondria News Articles.
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New drug molecules hold promise for treating fatal child disease
Scientists have identified a way to ''rescue'' muscle cells that have genetically mutated, paving the way to a possible new treatment for rare childhood illness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). (2021-02-22)

New research on mitochondrial function can play significant part in serious disease
Disorders of the cells' energy supply can cause a number of serious diseases, but also seem to be connected to ageing. More research is needed on mitochondrial function to find future treatments. A new study involving researchers at Karolinska Institutet shows how an important molecule inside the mitochondria affects their function in mice and fruit flies. The study, which is published in Science Advances, adds valuable knowledge on formerly relatively unexplored protein modifications. (2021-02-19)

Electron cryo-microscopy sheds light on how bioenergy makers are made in our body
Scientists uncover how the body's energy makers are made. A new paper published in Science by Alexey Amunts' laboratory with an international team of researchers reports the molecular mechanism of membrane-tethered protein synthesis in mitochondria. (2021-02-18)

FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

Oncotarget: Evaluation of cancer-derived myocardial impairments using a mouse model
'The established mouse cachexia model can therefore be considered useful for analyzing cancer-derived myocardial damage' (2021-02-10)

Technion researchers discover new pathway for attacking cancer cells
The folate cycle is a process essential to DNA and RNA production. As a result, it is highly important to both cancer cells and healthy cells. Because DNA production is a critical stage in cell division, and thus in tumor growth, the folate cycle is a common target for chemotherapy. However, for the very same reason, there are significant side effects to attacking it. (2021-02-05)

Two studies shed light on how, where body can add new fat cells
DALLAS - Feb. 3, 2021 - Gaining more fat cells is probably not what most people want, although that might be exactly what they need to fight off diabetes and other diseases. How and where the body can add fat cells has remained a mystery - but two new studies from UT Southwestern provide answers on the way this process works. (2021-02-03)

Body and mind: hormones in the brain may explain how exercise improves metabolism
A mitochondrial hormone expressed by cells deep in the brain appears to play a role in improving metabolism and fighting off obesity, according to a new study in mice. (2021-02-02)

Researchers demonstrate how defects in mitochondria may lead to autism spectrum disorder
Researchers have demonstrated that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be caused by defects in the mitochondria of brain cells. (2021-02-01)

Study helps understand why kids of obese mothers may be susceptible to metabolic diseases
The phenomenon may be associated with a deficiency of the protein mitofusin-2 in the mother's eggs, which affects the shape and functioning of mitochondria. The finding was based on experiments with mice conducted at the Federal University of São Carlos and reported in the journal Molecular Human Reproduction. (2021-01-26)

Bioorthogonally catalyzed lethality strategy generates targeting drugs within tumor
Selectively killing tumor while not causing damage to normal cells still remains a challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Professor Hongke Liu from Nanjing Normal University together with Professor Jing Zhao and Professor Zijian Guo from Nanjing University developed a novel strategy---bioorthogonally-catalyzed lethality to generate efficient anticancer species between two non-toxic components only within cancer cells and tumors without external catalysts, realizing the precise and efficient anticancer chemotherapy. (2021-01-25)

Sloan Kettering Institute scientists solve a 100-year-old mystery about cancer
A long-standing mystery is why fast-growing cells, like cancer cells and immune cells, rely on a seemingly inefficient form of metabolizing glucose to power their activities. In a new study, scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute offer a compelling solution. (2021-01-21)

See how they run: 'Exercise protein' doubles running capacity, restores function and extends healthy lifespans in older mice
A new study shows that humans express a powerful hormone during exercise and that treating mice with the hormone improves physical performance, capacity and fitness. Researchers say the findings present new possibilities for addressing age-related physical decline. (2021-01-20)

NAD+ can restore age-related muscle deterioration
Scientists at EPFL have discovered that Alzheimer's-like protein aggregates underly the muscle deterioration seen in aging. But the aggregates can be reversed by boosting the levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which turns on the defense systems of mitochondria in cells and restores muscle function. (2021-01-19)

Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-19)

Better diet and glucose uptake in the brain lead to longer life in fruit flies
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that fruit flies with genetic modifications to enhance glucose uptake have significantly longer lifespans. Looking at the brain cells of aging flies, they found that better glucose uptake compensates for age-related deterioration in motor functions, and led to longer life. The effect was more pronounced when coupled with dietary restrictions. This suggests healthier eating plus improved glucose uptake in the brain might lead to enhanced lifespans. (2021-01-16)

Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane (2021-01-15)

Ovarian cancer cells adapt to their surroundings to aid tumor growth
A description of how ovarian cancer cells adapt to survive and proliferate in the peritoneal cavity has been detailed by a new study. It shows structures inside the cells change as the disease progresses, to help the cells grow in an otherwise hostile environment of low oxygen and nutrients. Understanding how these cellular adaptations are regulated could herald new targeted treatment options against the fifth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. (2021-01-13)

Imaging technique proves effective in measuring mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neuron disease (MND)
Non-invasive imaging technique called 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy used to measure mitochondrial function in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) (2021-01-13)

Immune system killer cells controlled by circadian rhythms
An exhaustive dataset drawn from mammalian macrophage cells establishes that macrophage activity is controlled by circadian timing, and - with a substantial mismatch between oscillating proteins and mRNA - hints at unexpected calibration of that timing. (2021-01-12)

Chloroplasts on the move
How different plants can share their genetic material with each other (2021-01-11)

One in five brain cancers fueled by overactive mitochondria
A new study has found that up to 20% of aggressive brain cancers are fueled by overactive mitochondria and new drugs in development may be able to starve the cancers. (2021-01-11)

Bioenergetics: New features of ATP synthase
Structural studies of a mitochondrial ATP synthase illustrate the basis for the diversity of its membrane-shaping properties. (2021-01-08)

New findings help explain how COVID-19 overpowers the immune system
Seeking to understand why COVID-19 is able to suppress the body's immune response, new research from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology suggests that mitochondria are one of the first lines of defense against COVID-19 and identifies key differences in how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, interacts with mitochondrial genes when compared to other viruses. (2021-01-08)

UCLA scientists develop high-throughput mitochondria transfer device
Scientists from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer have developed a simple, high-throughput method for transferring isolated mitochondria and their associated mitochondrial DNA into mammalian cells. (2020-12-29)

New drug inhibits the growth of cancer cells
Blocking gene expression in mitochondria in mice stops cancer cells from growing (2020-12-22)

Cellular exclusion of mitochondria protects cells from damage
Researchers from Osaka University identified mitochondrial release out of cells as a novel mechanism by which cells turn over mitochondria and maintain cell health. The researchers found that cells deficient in the protein parkin, which is responsible for the hereditary form of Parkinson's disease (PD), showed markedly increased mitochondrial release. Further, cerebrospinal fluids of PD patients with a mutation in parkin contained elevated levels of mitochondria. This study could help develop new biomarkers and therapeutics. (2020-12-21)

Blood pressure drug may be key to increasing lifespan, new study shows
A stress response of mitochondria, the part of our cells that produce energy to power bodily functions, is important to a longer life. A team of scientists from Osaka City University, Japan, searched through a chemical ''library'' of existing drugs to find one that can activate this stress response in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. They found that an anti-hypertension drug called metolazone prolongs C. elegans lifespan, marking the first step in developing anti-aging pharmaceuticals. (2020-12-18)

New drug molecules hold promise for treating rare inherited terminal childhood disease
Scientists at the University of Exeter have identified a way to ''rescue'' cells that have genetically mutated, paving the way to a possible new treatment for rare terminal childhood illness such as mitochondrial disease. (2020-12-18)

How a very "sociable" protein can hold clues about Alzheimer's origin
An international team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have found how the ECSIT protein dictates the behaviour of proteins linked to the energy activity in mitochondria, which is largely affected in Alzheimer's disease. Their results are published today in Angewandte Chemie. (2020-12-16)

Novel principle for cancer treatment shows promising effect
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the journal Nature that they have developed novel first-in-class inhibitors that compromise mitochondrial function in cancer cells. Treatment with the inhibitors stopped cancer cells from proliferating and reduced tumor growth in mice, without significantly affecting healthy cells. (2020-12-16)

Amino acid recycling in cells: Autophagy helps cells adapt to changing conditions
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Japan, have shown for the first time how specific metabolites produced by autophagy are utilized by a cell. They discovered that in budding yeast adapting to respiratory growth, autophagy--an intracellular recycling system--recycles the amino acid serine to trigger growth through mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism. This study shows how the recycling function of autophagy is crucial for adaptation to fluctuating environmental conditions. (2020-12-10)

Blocking protein restores strength, endurance in old mice, Stanford study finds
A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans. (2020-12-10)

Single-eye gene therapy improves vision in both eyes of patients with inherited eye disorder
A gene therapy for an inherited eye disorder can ameliorate vision loss in both eyes despite only being injected into one, according to a phase 3 clinical trial involving 37 patients. (2020-12-09)

Long-term study of gene therapy technique in monkeys finds no adverse health effects
A decade after the birth of the first primates born with the aid of a gene therapy technique designed to prevent inherited mitochondrial disease, a careful study of the monkeys and their offspring reveals no adverse health effects. The new study generally bolsters the scientific basis for mitochondrial replacement therapy in human clinical trials, with an important caveat: Researchers found varying levels of carryover maternal mitochondrial DNA that had preferentially replicated and accumulated within some internal organs, although not enough to cause health effects. (2020-12-08)

Gasdermin offers insight into coral necrotic death
A research team led by Professor SUN Li from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS), in collaboration with Professor ZHOU Zhi from Hainan University, has identified gasdermin E (GSDME) from the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata and demonstrated that coral GSDME triggers pyroptosis and is involved in pathogen-induced coral death. (2020-12-04)

Researchers uncover significant reason older adults are at greater risk of heart attack
A team of surgeons has found an insufficient level of the protein Sesn2 is the reason older individuals are at greater risk of heart attack, which indicates stabilizing the protein could be the answer to maintaining a healthy heart. (2020-12-03)

Cell membranes in super resolution
For the first time ever, expansion microscopy allows the imaging of even the finest details of cell membranes. This offers new insights into bacterial and viral infection processes. (2020-12-02)

SLC25A51 regulates the transport of the coenzyme NAD into the mitochondria
Scientists at CeMM have now discovered that the previously uncharacterized protein SLC25A51 acts as a transporter into the mitochondria for the coenzyme NAD. This molecule has already been associated with processes such as aging, neurological diseases and the metabolism of cancer cells. Therefore, the results of this study not only open up new possibilities to study the biological role of NAD but also potentially provide the basis for new therapeutic approaches. (2020-12-01)

Scientists develop new gene therapy for eye disease
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to a progressive loss of vision and affects thousands of people across the globe. The study, which involved a collaboration with clinical teams in the Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital and the Mater Hospital, also has implications for a much wider suite of neurological disorders associated with ageing. (2020-11-26)

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