Current Mobile Phones News and Events

Current Mobile Phones News and Events, Mobile Phones News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Twist-n-Sync: Skoltech scientists use smartphone gyroscopes to sync time across devices
Skoltech researchers have designed a software-based algorithm for synchronizing time across smartphones that can be used in practical tasks requiring simultaneous measurements. This algorithm can essentially help turn several devices into a full-fledged network of sensors. (2021-02-22)

Location tracking apps and privacy implications
A recent study shows how, from location data, apps can retrieve a wide range of personal information about users, including their health, socio-economic status, ethnicity and religion. (2021-02-19)

Smartphone study points to new ways to measure food consumption
A team of researchers has devised a method using smartphones in order to measure food consumption--an approach that also offers new ways to predict physical well-being. (2021-02-18)

Graphene "nano-origami" creates tiniest microchips yet
A team of experimental physicists at the University of Sussex have developed the smallest microchips ever - 100 times smaller than conventional microchips. They believe that this next generation of microchips could lead to computers and phones running thousands of times faster. (2021-02-15)

Vibrating 2D materials
Two-dimensional materials hold out hope for many technical applications. An international research team now has determined for the first time how strongly 2D materials vibrate when electronically excited with light. (2021-02-11)

Coronavirus test from a suitcase
A portable suitcase could aid quick diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 cases in Africa. In cooperation with several African universities, scientists at Leipzig University have found that a mini-laboratory provides test results that are almost as good as a PCR test - and almost in real time. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal 'Analytical Chemistry'. (2021-02-11)

Use of mobile stroke units improves clinical outcomes
STEMOs have been serving Berlin for ten years. The specialized stroke emergency response vehicles allow physicians to start treating stroke patients before they reach hospital. For the first time, a team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has been able to show that the dispatch of mobile stroke units is linked to improved clinical outcomes. The researchers' findings, which show that patients for whom STEMOs were dispatched were more likely to survive without long-term disability, have been published in JAMA*. (2021-02-11)

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, Concordia paper reveals
Researchers at Concordia University found that emission levels dropped dramatically over the course of the pandemic. They measured downtown air quality monitoring station data from eight Canadian cities and compared their concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide between February and August 2020 to the figures recorded over the same period in 2018 and 2019. They also used satellite imagery and urban transportation fuel consumption figures to investigate emissions traffic congestion data provided by tracking technology embedded in phones and cars worldwide. (2021-02-09)

Design and deployment of COVID-19 technology responses and finding ways to make things
As governments try to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, many are turning to contact tracing, including apps that track your location and electronic check-in QR codes. But with that technology come questions of personal safety, privacy, trust, control and collective action. Katina Michael is an expert in public interest technology. She will share the challenges of deploying these types of services and ways to improve them. (2021-02-09)

New study shows pandemic's toll on jobs, businesses, and food security in poorer countries
The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic caused a sharp decline in living standards and rising food insecurity in low- and middle-income across the globe, according to a new study published Feb. 5 in the journal Science Advances. Using data collected between April-July 2020 in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Colombia, Ghana, Kenya, Nepal, Philippines, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone, researchers found drops in employment, income, and access to markets and services, translating into high levels of food insecurity. (2021-02-05)

RUDN University mathematicians developed new approach to 5g base stations operation
Mathematicians from RUDN University suggested and tested a new method to assess the productivity of fifth-generation (5G) base stations. The new technology would help get rid of mobile access stations and even out traffic fluctuations. (2021-02-03)

Age groups that sustain resurging COVID-19 epidemics in the United States
By late summer 2020, the resurgence of COVID-19 in the United States was largely driven by adults between the ages of 20 and 49, a new study finds. (2021-02-02)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

Culture shapes willingness to share personal data to reduce COVID-19 spread
Culture, civic-mindedness and privacy concerns influence how willing people are to share personal location information to help stem the transmission of COVID-19 in their communities, a new study finds. Such sharing includes giving public health authorities access to their geographic information via data gathered from phone calls, mobile apps, credit card purchases, wristband trackers or other technologies. (2021-01-27)

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers. However, results from previous research have shown that such cashless payments can increase consumers' spending on unhealthy food. (2021-01-27)

Fish sex organs boosted under high-CO2
Research from Australia has found that some species of fish will have higher reproductive capacity because of larger sex organs, under the more acidic oceans of the future. (2021-01-21)

Nano-thin piezoelectrics advance self-powered electronics
Researchers develop a flexible, printable and nano-thin material that can convert mechanical pressure into electrical energy. It's 800% more efficient than other piezoelectrics based on similar non-toxic materials. A significant step towards better wearable tech, new self-powered electronics and even pacemakers powered by heart beats (2021-01-19)

Robot learns fast but safe navigation strategy
A research group from the Active Intelligent System Laboratory (AISL) at Toyohashi University of Technology (TUT) has proposed a new framework for training mobile robots to quickly navigate while maintaining low collision rates. The framework combines deep reinforcement learning (DRL) and curriculum learning in the training process for robots to learn a fast but safe navigation policy. (2021-01-18)

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results confirmed the theory that positive emotions are mainly processed in the left half of the brain. (2021-01-13)

Why we use our smartphone at cafés
Why do people fiddle with their smartphones when they're with other people? Researchers have identified three main reasons. (2021-01-06)

Old silicon learns new tricks
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology fabricated regular arrays of iron-coated silicon crystals that are atomically smooth. The defect-free pyramidal composition of the crystals impart magnetic properties that will enhance the functionality of 3D spintronics and other technologies. (2021-01-06)

Industry collaboration leads to important milestone in the creation of a quantum computer
One of the obstacles for progress in the quest for a working quantum computer has been that the working devices that go into a quantum computer and perform the actual calculations, the qubits, have hitherto been made by universities and in small numbers. But in recent years, a pan-European collaboration, in partnership with French microelectronics leader CEA-Leti, has been exploring everyday transistors--that are present in billions in all our mobile phones--for their use as qubits. (2020-12-28)

Study finds patients with kidney failure are ready and willing to use mobile health
* In a survey of adults with kidney failure who were receiving dialysis, most owned mobile devices and had intermediate or advanced mobile health proficiency. * The main reasons for using mobile health were for making appointments, communicating with healthcare personnel, and obtaining laboratory results. (2020-12-22)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network. (2020-12-17)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

Earable computing: A new research area in the making
Research Group (SyNRG) at UIUC is defining a new sub-area of mobile technology that they call ''earable computing.'' The team believes that earphones will be the next significant milestone in wearable devices, and that new hardware, software, and apps will all run on this platform. (2020-12-15)

Political partisanship has had outsized influence on individual social mobility during COVID-19 pand
In the United States, political partisanship has played a much stronger role in individuals' decisions to limit their social mobility during the COVID-19 pandemic than the local incidence of the disease in their own (2020-12-11)

Restorative justice preferred among the Enga in Papua New Guinea
Most large-scale populations employ a punitive judicial system. Advocates have long called for a more restorative justice system that repairs harm to victims and reintegrates wrongdoers into society. A study analyzing 10 years of court cases of the Enga of Papua New Guinea show that they overwhelmingly emphasize restorative justice, allowing both sides and community members share their story, the community assists paying compensation to the victim, and supports reintegrating the offender back into society. (2020-12-10)

The world's first DNA 'tricorder' in your pocket
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have built the first mobile genome sequence analyzer, making DNA analysis portable and accessible anywhere in the world. (2020-12-07)

New CRISPR-based test for COVID-19 uses a smartphone camera
In a new study published in the scientific journal Cell, the team from Gladstone Institutes, UC Berkeley, and UC San Francisco has outlined the technology for a CRISPR-based test for COVID-19 that uses a smartphone camera to provide accurate results in under 30 minutes. (2020-12-04)

COVID-19 advice may have reduced exposure to heart attack triggers
A new study suggests that COVID-19 guidance in Sweden may have reduced people's risks of having a heart attack. By using anonymous location data from mobile phones, researchers developed an aggregate picture of the activities of the Swedish population and mapped it against attendances at the country's 29 emergency cardiac angiography units. (2020-12-03)

Study: Telemedicine use disparity during COVID-19 among head and neck cancer patients
Retrospective research by Henry Ford otolaryngologists found telemedicine use disparity among head and neck cancer patients. (2020-12-02)

Increasing HPV vaccine uptake in adolescents
More than 90 percent of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers could be prevented by widespread uptake of the HPV vaccine. Yet, vaccine use in the United States falls short of public health goals. (2020-12-01)

Why spending a long time on your phone isn't bad for mental health
General smartphone usage is a poor predictor of anxiety, depression or stress say researchers, who advise caution when it comes to digital detoxes. Researchers measured the time spent on smartphones by 199 iPhone users and 46 Android users for one week. Surprisingly, the amount of time spent on the smartphone was not related to poor mental health. Instead, the study found that mental health was associated with concerns and worries about their own smartphone usage. (2020-11-30)

Ultrathin spray-applied MXene antennas are ready for 5G
New antennas so thin that they can be sprayed into place are also robust enough to provide a strong signal at bandwidths that will be used by fifth-generation (5G) mobile devices. Performance results for the antennas, which are made from a new type of two-dimensional material called MXene, were recently reported by researchers at Drexel University and could have rammifications for mobile, wearable and connected ''internet of things'' technology. (2020-11-30)

Headset over earphone: Cancelling out unnecessary and unwanted noise
Researchers from the Centre for Audio, Acoustics and Vibration at the University of Technology Sydney impacts for health and well-being of their 'virtual Active Noise Control/Cancellation (ANC) headphone (2020-11-29)

UT researchers establish proof of principle in superconductor study
Three physicists in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, together with their colleagues from the Southern University of Science and Technology and Sun Yat-sen University in China, have successfully modified a semiconductor to create a superconductor, which may lead to unforeseen advancements in technology. (2020-11-18)

The role of drones in 5G network security
A study by Giovanni Geraci, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, and researchers at Mississippi State University (USA), which aims to improve the security of advanced wireless networks against a series of eavesdropping, interference and identity theft. (2020-11-18)

New understanding of mobility paves way for tomorrow's transport systems
Researchers at DTU and the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking model that provides a completely new understanding of our movement patterns. The model can come to play an important role when designing tomorrow's green modes of transport and has just been published in Nature. (2020-11-18)

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