Current Mold News and Events

Current Mold News and Events, Mold News Articles.
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A memory without a brain
Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified how the slime mold Physarum polycephalum saves memories - although it has no nervous system. (2021-02-23)

Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in future missions to Mars. (2021-02-22)

Aphids suck: Invasive aphid found on Danish apple trees
The spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola, an invasive pest, has been discovered for the first time in Denmark by University of Copenhagen researchers. The extent of its current distribution remains unknown, but in time, it could prove to be a troublesome pest for Danish apple growers. (2021-01-19)

As the American hemp industry grows, so does our understanding of hemp diseases
As hemp begins to reemerge as an important crop in the United States, scientists are beginning research into the diseases that might prevent the crop from flourishing. A study published in the December issue of Plant Health Progress is one of the first to study the potential disease and disorder limitations for hemp production in the southeastern United States. (2021-01-18)

Wearable electronics for continuous cardiac, respiratory monitoring
A small and inexpensive sensor, announced in Applied Physics Letters and based on an electrochemical system, could potentially be worn continuously by cardiac patients or others who require constant monitoring. A solution containing electrolyte substances is placed into a small circular cavity that is capped with a thin flexible diaphragm, allowing detection of subtle movements when placed on a patient's chest. The authors suggest their sensor could be used for diagnosis of respiratory diseases. (2021-01-12)

Research develops new theoretical approach to manipulate light
The quest to discover pioneering new ways in which to manipulate how light travels through electromagnetic materials has taken a new, unusual twist. (2020-12-08)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

Water predictions: Telling when a nanolithography mold will break through droplets
Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography is powerful method of producing polymer nanostructures by pressing a curable resin onto a mold. However, there are no convenient methods to determine the lifetime of molds. Now, in a recent study in Japan, scientists develop a simple strategy to reliably predict the durability of mold materials by observing how water droplets make contact with the mold's surface as it wears out and distorts with use. (2020-11-09)

Nature-inspired design--Mimicking moth eyes to produce transparent anti-reflective coatings
The eyes of moths have a biological nanostructure that grants them anti-reflective properties. Though researchers have managed to mimic this structure to produce anti-reflective coatings, current techniques are not easily scalable. Now, researchers from Japan have devised a strategy to produce large area moth-eye transparent films that greatly reduce reflectance and improve transmittance. These films could be used to better the visibility of screens and enhance the performance of solar panels. (2020-11-04)

Silk road contains genomic resources for improving apples
The fabled Silk Road is responsible for one of our favorite and most valuable fruits: the domesticated apple. Researchers have now assembled complete reference genomes and pan-genomes for apple and its two main wild progenitors, providing detailed genetic insights into apple domestication and important fruit traits that could help plant breeders improve the crop's flavor, texture, and resistance to stress and disease. (2020-11-02)

Stay focused: Algae-inspired polymers light the way for enhanced night vision
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba processed sulfur, and algae and plant compounds, into an elastic lens that maintains substantial variable focus in infrared imaging. This development will be useful in policing, firefighting, ecology, and many other applications where it's critical to see detail at variable distances in dark environments, such as at night or through smoke. (2020-10-27)

Painless paper patch test for glucose levels uses microneedles
Researchers at The University of Tokyo have developed a microneedle patch for monitoring glucose levels using a paper sensor. The device painlessly monitors fluid in the skin within seconds. Anyone can use the disposable patch without training, making it highly practical. Additionally, fabrication is easy, low cost, and the glucose sensor can be swapped for other paper-based sensors that monitor other important biomarkers. (2020-09-14)

Mold now associated with food quality
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied a range of perceptions among Danes about good, healthy and safe foodstuffs. Their findings report that mold prone foods are considered to be more natural than those with long shelf lives. This perception has changed in recent years and researchers believe that it may reverse itself in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. (2020-09-10)

Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. In a recently published study, a group of scientists focused on the effectors of that pathogen and confirmed that plant pathogens employ an array of mechanisms to escape plant immunity response. These mechanisms explain why integrated resistance in plants cannot last long. (2020-09-02)

Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Iowa State's Martin Thuo and his research group have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals. The team's metallic surfaces retained properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling textures. (2020-08-27)

New printing process advances 3D capabilities
More durable prosthetics and medical devices for patients and stronger parts for airplanes and automobiles are just some of the products that could be created through a new 3D printing technology invented by a UMass Lowell researcher. (2020-07-31)

How plantains and carbon nanotubes can improve cars
Researchers from the University of Johannesburg have shown that plantain, a starchy type of banana, is a promising renewable source for an emerging type of lighter, rust-free composite materials for the automotive industry. The natural plantain fibres are combined with carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin to form a natural fibre-reinforced hybrid polymer nanocomposite material. The composite has 31% more tensile and 34% more flexural strength than the epoxy resin alone. (2020-07-29)

Brazilian researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae
Edible, biocompatible and biodegradable, these fibers have potential for various medical applications. The results are described in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-07-24)

Recycling Japanese liquor leftovers as animal feed produces happier pigs and tastier pork
Tastier pork comes from pigs that eat the barley left over after making the Japanese liquor shochu. A team of professional brewers and academic farmers state that nutrients in the leftover fermented barley may reduce the animals' stress, resulting in better tasting sirloin and fillets. Feeding distillation leftovers to farm animals can improve the animals' quality of life, lower farmers' and brewers' costs, appeal to discerning foodies, and benefit the environment by reducing food waste. (2020-07-21)

New research reveals antifungal symbiotic peptide in legume
Danforth Center scientists, Dilip Shah, PhD, research associate member, Siva Velivelli, PhD, postdoctoral associate, Kirk Czymmek, PhD, principal investigator and director, Advanced Bioimaging Laboratory and their collaborators at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have identified a sub class of peptides in the nodules of the legume, Medicago truncatula that proved effective in inhibiting growth of the fungus causing gray mold. (2020-07-20)

Programmable balloons pave the way for new shape-morphing devices
A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has designed materials that can control and mold a balloon into pre-programmed shapes. The system uses kirigami sheets -- thin sheets of material with periodic cuts -- embedded into an inflatable device. (2020-07-08)

Novel and simple method to engineer a platform mimicking blood vessels
SUTD collaborated with Keio University to design and fabricate a versatile platform to replicate the pulsatile blood flow in blood vessels, which allows for in-depth investigation into pathological conditions. (2020-06-26)

Fungal pathogen disables plant defense mechanism
Cabbage plants defend themselves against herbivores and pathogens by deploying a defensive mechanism called the mustard oil bomb. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the University of Pretoria have now been able to show that this defense is also effective against the widespread fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. However, the pathogen uses at least two different detoxification mechanisms that enable the fungus to successfully spread on plants defended in this way. (2020-06-19)

Ozone disinfectants can be used to sterilize cloth and n95 masks against COVID-19
Ozone gas has been shown to kill the SARS coronavirus in at least seventeen separate studies [1, 2]. Since the structure of the SARS coronavirus is almost identical to COVID-19; it is logical to assume that it will also kill COVID-19. (2020-05-26)

Surfaces that grip like gecko feet could be easily mass-produced
The science behind sticky gecko's feet lets gecko adhesion materials pick up about anything. But cost-effective mass production of the materials was out of reach until now. A new method of making them could usher the spread of gecko-inspired grabbers to assembly lines and homes. (2020-05-06)

Intricate magnetic configuration of 3D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers from Tohoku University and institutions in the UK, Germany and Switzerland has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3D chiral network-like nanostructures. The findings add a new candidate system for research into unconventional information processing and emergent phenomena relevant to spintronics. (2020-04-30)

Loners help society survive, say Princeton ecologists
When most of a community is rushing in one direction, the few who hang back may serve to protect the whole population from something catastrophic attacking the group, says a team of ecologists led by Corina Tarnita. (2020-03-18)

Molds damage the lung's protective barrier to spur future asthma attacks
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have identified a new way that common Aspergillus molds can induce asthma, by first attacking the protective tissue barrier deep in the lungs. In both mice and humans, an especially strong response to this initial damage was associated with developing an overreaction to future mold exposure and the constricted airways characteristic of asthma. (2020-03-12)

City of Hope scientists identify first invasive case of rare mold in a cancer patient
City of Hope scientists have found a toxic fungus previously thought to not be infectious in the sinus tissues of a man with refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia. This is the first time that direct infection of a patient with the black mold Stachybotrys has been recorded. The team's findings published this week in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2020-03-11)

Astronomers use slime mold model to reveal dark threads of the cosmic web
A computational approach inspired by the growth patterns of a bright yellow slime mold has enabled a team of astronomers and computer scientists at UC Santa Cruz to trace the filaments of the cosmic web that connects galaxies throughout the universe. (2020-03-10)

Slime mold simulations used to map dark matter holding universe together
The behavior of one of nature's humblest creatures is helping astronomers probe the largest structures in the universe. There is an uncanny resemblance between the networks single-cell slime molds create to seek food and the vast cobweb structure of filaments gravity builds to tie galaxies and clusters of galaxies together. (2020-03-10)

Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. (2020-03-04)

'Triangle 2' plastic containers may see environmental makeover
Cornell chemists can demonstrate how to make high-density polyethylene with better control over polymer chain lengths, which allows for improvement over physical properties such as processability and strength, according to research published Dec. 27, 2019, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-03-04)

New process for preserving lumber could offer advantages over pressure treating
Researchers have developed a new method that could one day replace conventional pressure treating as a way to make lumber not only fungal-resistant but also nearly impervious to water -- and more thermally insulating. (2020-02-13)

Prenatal and early life exposure to multiple air pollutants increases odds of toddler allergies
A new article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows a significant association between multiple prenatal and early life exposures to indoor pollutants and the degree of allergic sensitivity in 2-year-olds. (2019-12-05)

Taming the wild cheese fungus
The flavors of fermented foods are heavily shaped by the fungi that grow on them, but the evolutionary origins of those fungi aren't well understood. Experimental findings published this week in mBio offer microbiologists a new view on how those molds evolve from wild strains into the domesticated ones used in food production. (2019-10-15)

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago
Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago. (2019-10-08)

Virtual human hand simulation holds promise for prosthetics
Animating human hands has long been considered one of the most challenging problems in computer graphics. That's because it has been impossible to capture the internal movement of the hand in motion -- until now. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a technique inspired by the visual effects industry, USC researchers have developed the world's most realistic model of the human hand's musculoskeletal system in motion. Applications include computer graphics, prosthetics, medical education, robotics, virtual reality. (2019-09-26)

Tailored 'cell sheets' to improve post-operative wound closing and healing
Scientists have designed a new method for post-operative wound closing and healing that is both fast and effective. This strategy revolves around engineered 'cell sheets' -- or layers of skin-based cells. The procedure culminates in a wound dressing that is custom made for a specific cut or lesion that can be used to effectively treat open skin areas after surgeries. The findings were published in Scientific Reports on July 18th. (2019-09-18)

Researchers' review paper reveal insights into high quality fabrication of nanocomposites
SUTD together with research collaborators provide much needed analysis and review of the emerging research on particle reinforced metal matrix nanocomposites with selective laser melting, charting out possibilities for engineering applications. (2019-08-26)

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