Current Molecular Biology News and Events

Current Molecular Biology News and Events, Molecular Biology News Articles.
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Scientists model a peculiar type of breast cancer
Scientists led by EPFL have developed a breakthrough in vivo model for invasive lobular carcinoma, a serious yet understudied type of breast cancer. The work will open up previously inaccessible study of the tumor's biology and help discover new therapies. (2021-02-22)

Addressing the biological causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer
A new review published in Cancer Reports examines the biological differences in the development of prostate cancer across ethnicities. (2021-02-18)

How inflammatory signalling molecules contribute to carcinogenesis
A team of MedUni Vienna researchers led by Johannes A. Schmid at the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Vascular Biology and Thrombosis Research, has managed to identify a previously unknown molecular connection between an inflammatory signalling molecule and one of the main oncogenes. The study has been published in the leading journal 'Molecular Cancer'. (2021-02-17)

Dr. Frederick Boop presents at the ISPN 2020 Virtual Meeting
Understanding the molecular biology of brain tumors is key to prognosis and treatment said Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute Co-Director Frederick Boop, MD, in his presentation ''How Molecular Biology Impacts Clinical Practice'' at the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery (ISPN) 2020 Virtual Meeting. (2021-02-17)

Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex
Researchers at University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins. (2021-02-15)

SRC-3 is a novel regulator of human immune T regulatory cells
SRC-3, a prognostic marker for aggressive human breast and other cancers, also regulates human immune T regulatory cells (Tregs), which are involved in fighting cancer. (2021-02-11)

New clues to how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells
The molecular details of how SARS-CoV-2 enters cells and infects them are still not clear. Researchers at Uppsala University have tested the bioinformatic predictions made by another research group and have identified receptors that could be important players in the process. The results are presented in the journal Science Signaling and at the AAAS Annual Meeting held this week. (2021-02-08)

How lipids distribute proteins within cells
Researchers have observed how lipids distribute proteins within cells, a discovery that could open the door to understanding the causes of protein transport related diseases, such as cancer or neurodegenerative diseases (2021-01-29)

Study details N439K variant of SARS-CoV-2
An international team of researchers has characterized the effect and molecular mechanisms of an amino acid change in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein N439K. Viruses with this mutation are both common and rapidly spreading around the globe. The peer reviewed version of the study appears January 25 in the journal Cell. (2021-01-28)

A research team from Denmark discovers new control mechanism in the innate immune system
Although the protein ITIH4 is found in large amounts in the blood, its function has so far been unknown. By combining many different techniques, researchers from Aarhus University have discovered that ITIH4 inhibits proteases in the innate immune system via an unknown mechanism. The research results have just been published in the prestigious scientific journal Science Advances. (2021-01-26)

SARS-CoV-2 reacts to antibodies of virus from 2003 SARS outbreak, new study reveals
A new study demonstrates that antibodies generated by the novel coronavirus react to other strains of coronavirus and vice versa, according to research published today by scientists from Oregon Health & Science University. (2021-01-25)

Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems
Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems. (2021-01-21)

Detailed tumour profiling
As part of a clinical study involving patients from the University Hospitals in Zurich and Basel, researchers are conducting a thorough and highly precise investigation into the molecular and functional properties of tumours. Their goal is to help physicians to better determine which treatment will best match every patient's cancer and thus be most effective. (2021-01-21)

Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-19)

A massive advance in spectrometry
Kanazawa University scientists use computer simulations of charged molecules to help improve the accuracy of mass spectrometers. By understanding the collisions between ions that reduce excess charges, this work may lead to more sensitive radiocarbon dating and medical testing. (2021-01-18)

Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane (2021-01-15)

New PTSD biotypes enables improved tests, sheds light on divergent treatments efficacy
Researchers from the PTSD Systems Biology Consortium identified distinct biotypes for post-traumatic stress disorder, the first of their kind for any psychological disorder. These biotypes can refine the development of screening tools and may explain the varying efficacy of PTSD treatments. PTSD diagnosis is complicated by over-reliance on self-reporting of patient symptoms, particularly underreporting signs of distress due to perceived stigma. Researchers identified two PTSD biotypes with differing genetic markers and underlying mechanisms of disease. (2021-01-14)

Cracking the code of a shapeshifting protein
A shapeshifting immune system protein called XCL1 evolved from a single-shape ancestor hundreds of millions of years ago. Now, researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) discovered the molecular basis for how this happened. In the process they uncovered principles that scientists can use to design purpose-built nanoscale transformers for use as biosensors, components of molecular machines, and even therapeutics. (2021-01-11)

Keeping sperm cells on track
Researchers point to a new mechanism underlying male infertility. (2021-01-07)

Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems. (2021-01-06)

Uncovering how plants see blue light
Plants can perceive and react to light across a wide spectrum. New research from the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences shows how plants can respond to blue light in particular by revealing the structure of cryptochrome-2, the molecule that reacts to blue light. (2021-01-04)

Molecular reporters expose the allies of the brain tumor
Until recently, it was unclear how and why cancer cells adapt to their environment. A team led by Gaetano Gargiulo at MDC has now developed a technology that can be used to observe the molecular processes in living cells. The researchers present their results in the journal Cancer Discovery. (2020-12-23)

BioAFMviewer software for simulated atomic force microscopy of biomolecules
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to obtain images and movies showing proteins at work, however with limited resolution. The developed BioAFMviewer software opens the opportunity to use the enormous amount of available high-resolution protein data to better understand experiments. Within an interactive interface with rich functionality, the BioAFMviewer computationally emulates tip-scanning of any biomolecular structure to generate simulated AFM graphics and movies. They greatly help in the interpretation of e.g., high-speed AFM observations. (2020-12-22)

Scientists pinpoint molecular cause for severe disorder in children
A team of scientists from the University of Ottawa have opened a window into the cause of a rare genetic disorder that causes mortality in young children. (2020-12-22)

Variety: Spice of life for bumble bees
The yield and quality of many crops benefit from pollination, but it isn't just honey bees that do this work: bumble bees also have a role. A team led by University of Göttingen used innovative molecular biological methods and traditional microscopy to investigate the pollen collecting behaviour of honey bees and bum-ble bees in agricultural landscapes. It turns out bumble bees take much more pollen from different plant species than honey bees to satisfy their need for protein. (2020-12-21)

New mechanism of force transduction in muscle cells discovered
Researchers at the University of Münster (Germany) have now discovered how the muscle-specific adhesion molecule metavinculin modulates mechanical force transduction on the molecular level. The research results have just been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-18)

Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry. (2020-12-17)

Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure. 'We expect that the genetically encoded photosensitizer SuperNova2 will find use in a wide range of experimental models,' Konstantin Lukyanov, a professor at the Skoltech Center of Life Sciences (CLS), comments. (2020-12-17)

Chronic stress? Zebrafish to the rescue
A team of researchers led by MIPT's Allan Kalueff has studied chronic stress in zebrafish and determined that the animal can serve as a valuable model species for research into the associated brain diseases, complementing research currently done on rodents. The paper was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-14)

A matter of balance: asymmetric divisions are crucial to form a functional retina
Researchers at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, have discovered that in the developing retina, and important part of the central nervous system, the divisions leading to the first differentiating neurons are asymmetric and that this asymmetry is necessary to generate the correct types of neurons in the right numbers and proportions. (2020-12-11)

New and unexplored dimension in the study of protein-protein interactions
Cells accumulate glutamate and related molecules under stress, and so formation of high-order protein assemblies under these conditions has important biological implications. Specifically, this would represent a mechanism by which the presence of stressor compounds in the cell could control DNA replication. (2020-12-09)

Protein molecules in cells function as miniature antennas
Researchers led by Josef Lazar from IOCB Prague have demonstrated that molecules of fluorescent proteins act as antennas with optical properties (i.e. the ability to absorb and emit light) dependent on their spatial orientation. First discovered in jellyfish, fluorescent proteins are nowadays widely used in studies of molecular processes in living cells and organisms. The newly described properties of these molecules will find applications in basic biological research as well as in novel drug discovery. (2020-12-02)

Visualisation reveals how a protein 'hunkers down' to conserve energy
A visualisation made from nearly 100,000 electron microscope images has revealed the ingenious way a protein involved in muscle activity shuts itself down to conserve energy. The protein is called myosin and it is known as a molecular motor because of the way it interacts with other proteins and energy molecules to generate force and movement. It is found inside muscle fibres where it forms long myosin filaments made up of hundreds of individual myosin molecules. (2020-12-02)

Molecular 'barcode' helps decide which sperm will reach an egg
A protein called CatSper1 may act as a molecular 'barcode' that helps determine which sperm cells will make it to an egg and which are eliminated along the way. (2020-12-01)

Vitamin D regulates calcium in intestine differently than previously thought
A Rutgers study has discovered that vitamin D regulates calcium in a section of the intestine that previously was thought not to have played a key role. The findings have important implications on how bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may disrupt calcium regulation. (2020-12-01)

Molecular mechanism of long-term memory discovered
Researchers at the University of Basel have discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a central role in intact long-term memory. This mechanism is also involved in physiological memory loss in old age. (2020-11-30)

Treatment shows reduction in heart failure after myocardial infarction
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine identified potential preventative therapies for heart failure after a significant heart attack. (2020-11-24)

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake. (2020-11-24)

Study reveals true origin of oldest evidence of animals
Two teams of scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth. The joint studies found molecular fossils extracted from 635-million-year-old rocks aren't the earliest evidence of animals, but instead common algae. (2020-11-23)

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