Current Molecular Imaging News and Events

Current Molecular Imaging News and Events, Molecular Imaging News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
A new piece of the HIV infection puzzle explored
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Heidelberg University Hospital combine high-resolution imaging to observe the infection process in cell nuclei, opening the door for new therapeutics. (2021-02-18)

Radiological images confirm 'COVID-19 can cause the body to attack itself'
Muscle soreness and achy joints are common symptoms among COVID-19 patients. But for some people, symptoms are more severe, long lasting and even bizarre, including rheumatoid arthritis flares, autoimmune myositis or 'COVID toes.' A new Northwestern Medicine study has, for the first time, confirmed and illustrated the causes of these symptoms through radiological imaging. (2021-02-17)

Capturing the contours of live cells with novel nanoimaging technique using graphene
Researchers from DGIST have now found a way to keep living, wet cells viable in an ultra-high-vacuum environment, using graphene, allowing--like never before--accurate high-resolution visualization of the undistorted molecular structure and distribution of lipids in cell membranes. This could enhance our bioimaging abilities considerably, improving our understanding of mechanisms underlying complex diseases such as cancers and Alzheimer's. (2021-02-17)

3D-printing perovskites on graphene makes next-gen X-ray detectors
By using 3D aerosol jet-printing to put perovskites on graphene, scientists at EPFL have made X-ray detectors with record sensitivity that can greatly improve the efficiency and reduce the cost and health hazard of medical imaging devices. (2021-02-17)

Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new approach to X-ray imaging can help surgeons performing breast cancer tumour removal surgery, giving 2.5 times better detection of diseased tissue around the edge of the tumour than with standard imaging. (2021-02-17)

Ultrabright dots see beyond skin deep
Tiny light-emitting probes give researchers a better option for noninvasive imaging of living tissue. (2021-02-16)

Molecular imaging determines effectiveness of novel metastatic breast cancer treatment
Molecular imaging can successfully predict response to a novel treatment for ER-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients who are resistant to hormonal therapy. According to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using an imaging agent called 18F-fluoroestradiol can help to determine which patients could benefit from treatments that could spare them from unnecessary chemotherapy. (2021-02-16)

Model helps predict which patients will benefit most from PSMA PET scan
A new study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center helps identify which patients with prostate cancer will benefit most from the use of prostate-specific membrane antigen PET imaging, PSMA PET, a novel imaging technique that recently was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2021-02-16)

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex
Researchers at University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins. (2021-02-15)

Child brain tumors can be classified by advanced imaging and AI
Diffusion weighted imaging and machine learning can successfully classify the diagnosis and characteristics of common types of paediatric brain tumours a UK-based multi-centre study, including WMG at the University of Warwick has found. This means that the tumour can be characterised and treated more efficiently. (2021-02-15)

Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly
Researchers in Southampton and San Francisco have developed the first compact 3D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used. (2021-02-10)

Evidence for routine brain tumor imaging is murky, but research can shed light
After treatment, medical staff use routine brain scans to monitor progress in brain tumor patients. However, how often such scans should occur is unclear. A Position Statement from a large group of UK experts highlights that the evidence behind current scanning routines is weak. The article highlights numerous ways that researchers can gather evidence to improve scanning routines so that they are most effective and do not interfere with patient quality of life. (2021-02-09)

AD diagnostics could become more accessible
A team of researchers from the Laboratory of Biophysics at NUST MISIS, Lomonosov Moscow State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia has summarized metal-containing diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to the researchers, their use could improve access to diagnostic imaging of AD among the risk groups. (2021-02-09)

Joint radionuclide therapy-immunotherapy approach effective in prostate cancer model
A combination of radionuclide therapy and immunotherapy has proven successful in slowing the progression of prostate cancer and increasing survival time, according to new research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The results of the murine study indicate that radionuclide therapy promotes prostate cancer immunogenicity, provoking a cellular response that makes the tumors more receptive to immunotherapy. (2021-02-08)

Best of both worlds: A hybrid method for tracking laparoscopic ultrasound transducers
In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Imaging, a team of scientists from the US have come up with a creative solution. Instead of relying entirely on either hardware- or CV-based tracking, they propose a hybrid approach that combines both methods. (2021-02-04)

Dartmouth-invented technology allows doctors to see beam field during radiation treatment
With the use of the BeamSite Cherenkov imaging camera system invented by DoseOptics, LLC., radiation oncologists at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center can capture real-time external beam delivery images during cancer patients' standard radiation therapy sessions. These images are used to verify that the beam is targeting the exact area intended, and make necessary adjustments to prevent unintentional exposure to patients. (2021-02-04)

Skoltech imaging resources used in international experiment with new photocatalysts
Skoltech researchers helped their colleagues from Japan, Germany, the United States, and China study the crystal structure and optical properties of a new class of two-dimensional compounds, which can be used as effective visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for energy and chemical conversion. They used the Advanced Imaging Core Facility equipment for imaging and structural analysis. (2021-02-01)

High-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Tohoku University, Toin University of Yokohama, and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) have succeeded in developing a scanless high-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution for a 3D space. The system is based on digital holography. The developed microscopy system has an algorithm to acquire 3D information of fluorescent objects toward scanless 3D measurement in less than 1 millisecond. (2021-01-29)

Beckman Institute MRI expertise aids research on hemodialysis therapy patients
Beckman Institute researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used a nonstandard magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate patients' response to a strategy to aid those with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy. (2021-01-27)

First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

Whole body imaging detects myeloma in more patients, treatment initiated earlier
Researchers from King's College London have shown that whole body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) not only detects more myeloma-defining disease than positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) but that it also allows critical treatment to be initiated earlier. (2021-01-21)

Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems
Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems. (2021-01-21)

Detailed tumour profiling
As part of a clinical study involving patients from the University Hospitals in Zurich and Basel, researchers are conducting a thorough and highly precise investigation into the molecular and functional properties of tumours. Their goal is to help physicians to better determine which treatment will best match every patient's cancer and thus be most effective. (2021-01-21)

Expanded PET imaging time window adds flexibility for neuroendocrine tumor patients
The imaging time window of 64Cu-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms can be expanded from one hour to three hours post-injection, according to new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In a head-to-head comparison of scans performed at the two time intervals, there were no significant differences in the number of lesions detected, and tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained high in all key organs. (2021-01-20)

Drug-delivery microcapsules tagged with zirconium-89 can be tracked by PET imaging
Polymer and radionuclide chemists report major advance in microcapsule drug delivery systems. Their microcapsules -- labeled with radioactive zirconium-89 -- are the first example of hollow polymer capsules capable of long-term, multiday positron emission tomography imaging in vivo. In previous work, the researchers showed that the hollow capsules could be filled with a potent dose of the cancer drug doxorubicin, which could then be released by therapeutic ultrasound that ruptures the microcapsules. (2021-01-20)

Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. (2021-01-19)

Increased blood flow during sleep tied to critical brain function
Our brains experience significant changes in blood flow and neural activity during sleep, according to Penn State researchers. Such changes may help to clean out metabolic brain waste that builds up during the day. (2021-01-18)

Giant 2D atlas of the universe helps dark energy spectroscopic survey
Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and their collaborators released a giant 2D map of the universe, which paves the way for the upcoming new-generation dark energy spectroscopic survey. (2021-01-14)

Potential jurors favor use of artificial intelligence in precision medicine
Physicians who follow artificial intelligence (AI) advice may be considered less liable for medical malpractice than is commonly thought, according to a new study of potential jury candidates in the U.S. Published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM). The study provides the first data related to physicians' potential liability for using AI in personalized medicine, which can often deviate from standard care. (2021-01-11)

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers
Reactive molecules, such as free radicals, can be produced in the body after exposure to certain environments or substances and go on to cause cell damage. Antioxidants can minimize this damage by interacting with the radicals before they affect cells. (2021-01-08)

Want to diagnose brain diseases? A mass spectrometry imaging may one day help you
Researchers from Osaka University used mass spectrometry imaging to quantitate the distribution of fat molecules in mouse brain sections. With further development, this will help medical practitioners reliably diagnose diseases without damaging the tissue. (2021-01-07)

Viewing upper gastrointestinal cancers in a new light
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report the use of Linked Color Imaging, an innovative modality that specifically combines selected wavelengths of light for illumination in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This method, by enhancing the subtle variations in red and white hues that indicate mucosal transformation, greatly improves the early detection of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms as compared with conventional white light illumination. (2021-01-05)

Imaging of ballistic wounds, bullet composition and implications for MRI safety
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), because patients with ballistic embedded fragments are frequently denied MRI (due to indeterminate bullet composition sans shell casings), radiography and CT can be used to identify nonferromagnetic projectiles that are safe for MRI. (2020-12-29)

The brain's protein factories at work
Protein synthesis is a finely tuned process in the cell by macromolecules known as ribosomes. Which regulators are responsible for controlling protein synthesis in the brain? To address this question, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin studied the structure of the brain's ribosomal complexes in great detail. The team was able to identify a new factor which is also involved in controlling brain development. Details of this research have been published in Molecular Cell*. (2020-12-22)

Researchers deconstruct ancient Jewish parchment using multiple imaging techniques
Scientists in Romania used multiple, complementary imaging techniques to non-invasively study the composition of an aged Jewish parchment scroll. The various analyses can determine the types of materials used in the manuscript's manufacturing, providing historical context for objects of mysterious provenance. The research also offers insights into the item's degradation over time, including indications of previous repair attempts. All of this information helps conservators determine how best to restore such antiques to their original condition. (2020-12-18)

New mechanism of force transduction in muscle cells discovered
Researchers at the University of Münster (Germany) have now discovered how the muscle-specific adhesion molecule metavinculin modulates mechanical force transduction on the molecular level. The research results have just been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-18)

New theranostic approach reduces tumor volume and increases survival in NET study
A pair of copper radionuclides that target the somatostatin receptor overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors has proven successful in identifying tumors and improving survival. According to new research published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the imaging agent 64Cu-CuSarTate produced high-quality positron emission tomography (PET) images in a mouse model of neuroendocrine tumors, while its therapeutic counterpart, 67Cu-CuSarTate, was highly effective in reducing tumor volume and extending lifespan. (2020-12-16)

Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to research presented at EACVI - Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The stairs test is an easy way to check your heart health,' said study author Dr. Jesús Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Coruña, Spain. (2020-12-11)

PET imaging tracer proves effective for diagnosing and managing rare CNS B-cell lymphoma
Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-pentixafor is an effective diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) B-cell lymphoma, according to a proof-of-concept study published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-12-10)

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine celebrates 60 years of research
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) has issued a special supplement commemorating six decades of leadership in the field of nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and therapy. The supplement features a collection of the most influential and frequently cited manuscripts in JNM's history, representing seminal discoveries and scientific contributions that shaped the future of medicine. Invited perspectives from world leaders in nuclear medicine, molecular imaging, and theranostics explain why each of these articles had such an enormous impact. (2020-12-10)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.