Current Molecular Imaging News and Events | Page 24

Current Molecular Imaging News and Events, Molecular Imaging News Articles.
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NeuroVision announces participation in landmark Alzheimer's A4 study
NeuroVision Imaging LLC ('NeuroVision') today announced its participation in a new substudy with investigators at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine (UC San Diego) and the University of Southern California (USC) to be part of the landmark Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's (or 'A4') clinical trial. The purpose of the A4 study is to test whether a new investigational treatment that may reduce beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain can also slow memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease. (2017-02-28)

Elsevier announces the launch of CASE: Cardiovascular Imaging Case Reports
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical, and medical information products and services, and the American Society of Echocardiography, a professional, nonprofit organization of scientists and healthcare workers involved in cardiovascular ultrasound, today announced the launch of CASE: Cardiovascular Imaging Case Reports. (2017-02-28)

FASEB Science Research Conference: The Biology & Chemistry of Vision
This SRC is the only meeting of its kind specifically dedicated to the field of photoreceptor biology. The scientific program reflects the multi-disciplinary nature of this field, encompassing classical biochemistry and structural biology as well as modern imaging techniques and molecular therapeutic approaches. (2017-02-28)

Time for physicians to prepare for impending appropriate use mandate
Within a year, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will implement a provision in the Protecting Access to Medicare Act that requires physicians to consult appropriate use criteria using CMS-approved computer-based clinical decision support mechanisms when ordering advanced imaging procedures. (2017-02-27)

Super resolution imaging helps determine a stem cell's future
Scientists at Rutgers and other universities have created a new way to identify the state and fate of stem cells earlier than previously possible. Understanding a stem cell's fate -- the type of cell it will eventually become -- and how far along it is in the process of development can help scientists better manipulate cells for stem cell therapy. (2017-02-27)

Follow-up imaging significantly less when initial ED ultrasound is interpreted by radiologists than
According to new research by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, the use of follow-up imaging is significantly less when initial emergency department (ED) ultrasound examinations are interpreted by a radiologist than a nonradiologist. The study is published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). (2017-02-22)

Rapid Imaging of Polymers Could Lead to Better Bioimaging
A recent study by researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois identifies a method of Quantum Cascade Laser-based (QCL) infrared spectroscopic imaging that provides a more rapid method than conventional Fourier transform infrared imaging (FT-IR) to examine spherulites, large semicrystalline polymer samples, in order to identify chemical and structural properties. (2017-02-22)

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons
Scientists at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience are working to understand how neurons in the cerebellum, a region in the back of the brain that controls movement, interact with each other. The team showed that a form of short-term neuronal plasticity known as analog-to-digital facilitation can impact neurotransmission in as little as 100 milliseconds and depends upon inactivation of Kv3 channels. Understanding this type of neuronal plasticity may have important implications for understanding motor disorders. (2017-02-21)

High-sensitivity cameras reveal the atomic structure of metal-organic frameworks
Sensitive cameras enable high-resolution transmission-electron microscopy imaging of the atomic structure of metal-organic frameworks. (2017-02-20)

Understanding how HIV evades the immune system
Monash University (Australia) and Cardiff University (UK) researchers have come a step further in understanding how the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evades the immune system. (2017-02-20)

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes
In a new study, researchers report for the first time the effective imaging of the nanoscale structure of C. elegans nematodes' cuticle using atomic force microscopy operating in PeakForce Tapping mode. (2017-02-17)

Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'
Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer. Vadim Backman will discuss the technology and its applications -- including the new concept of macrogenomics, a technology aiming to regulate the global patterns of gene expression without gene editing -- at the 2017 AAAS annual meeting. (2017-02-17)

3-D printed 'eagle eye' camera mimics sharp vision of predators
A new study presents a miniaturized camera inspired by the natural vision of predators such as eagles that captures images with a high central acuity. (2017-02-15)

Is it depression or dementia? Brain SPECT imaging helps distinguish them
Does a patient have depression or a cognitive disorder (CD) such as Alzheimer's disease or both? Since both disorders have overlapping symptoms, how can a clinician tell them apart to make an appropriate diagnosis? In a new article published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, researchers have found that single photon emission computed tomography, or SPECT, can help to distinguish between these diagnostic categories. (2017-02-15)

High-res biomolecule imaging
Tiny defects in diamonds known as nitrogen vacancy defects could lead to high-resolution images of the structure of biological molecules, according to a new study by MIT researchers. (2017-02-14)

New method to detect ultrasound with light
A tiny, transparent device that fits into a contact lens can determine the speed of blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate at the back of the eye, helping to diagnose diseases such as macular degeneration. (2017-02-13)

Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery
Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells. (2017-02-13)

Mutant maize offers key to understanding plant growth
New findings by a University of California, Riverside-led team of researchers, lend support to the second idea, that the orientation of cell division is critical for overall plant growth. (2017-02-13)

Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as American scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The replacement of chelator-based labeling by intrinsic labeling significantly enhances the bioimaging accuracy and reduces biases. (2017-02-09)

'Corrective glass' for mass spectrometry imaging
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now improved mass spectrometry imaging in such a way that the distribution of molecules can also be visualized on rippled, hairy, bulgy or coarse surfaces. The source of the laser-based technique was custom-built to accommodate the topography of non-flat samples. The new tool can be used for answering ecological questions from a new perspective. (2017-02-08)

New method improves accuracy of imaging systems
New research provides scientists looking at single molecules or into deep space a more accurate way to analyze imaging data captured by microscopes, telescopes and other devices. The findings, published Dec. 26 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a mechanism -- known as single-pixel interior filling function, or SPIFF -- to detect and correct systematic errors in data and image analysis used in many areas of science and engineering. (2017-02-07)

Low-cost imaging system detects natural gas leaks in real time
Researchers have developed an infrared imaging system that could one day offer low-cost, real-time detection of methane gas leaks in pipelines and at oil and gas facilities. Leaks of methane, the primary component of natural gas, can be costly and dangerous while also contributing to climate change as a greenhouse gas. (2017-02-06)

Radiotargeted therapy with SST2 antagonists could combat multiple human cancers
A study published in the February issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrates the potential of extending peptide receptor radionuclide therapy targeting the somatostatin receptor to other types of malignancies beyond neuroendocrine tumors. (2017-02-06)

Unearthing immune responses to common drugs
Australian researchers are a step closer to understanding immune sensitivities to well-known, and commonly prescribed, medications. (2017-02-06)

Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
In studying a cousin of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, scientists have drawn a molecular map of the target for rifampicin, a common antibiotic. They are now using it in an effort to combat multi-resistant tuberculosis, for which existing treatments don't work. (2017-02-03)

A peek at the nightlife of synapses reveals they weaken, and why
Two studies in this issue offer a glimpse at the nightlife of synapses, the neural connections in the nervous system. Both reveal significant changes in the structure and molecular machinery of synapses during slumber in mice. (2017-02-02)

New type of PET imaging identifies primary and metastatic prostate cancer
In the featured article from the February 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers document the first-in-human application of a new imaging agent to help find prostate cancer in both early and advanced stages and plan treatment. The study indicates that the new agent -- a PET radiotracer -- is both safe and effective. (2017-02-01)

Potential new drug class hits multiple cancer cell targets, boosting efficacy and safety
In a new paper published this week in PNAS, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, in collaboration with colleagues at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, the University of Colorado School of Medicine and SignalRx, a San Diego-based biopharmaceutical company, describe a potential new class of anti-cancer drugs that inhibit two or more molecular targets at once, maximizing therapeutic efficiency and safety. (2017-02-01)

Webinar to highlight strategies, limitations of managing acute ischemic stroke
New strategies that integrate imaging into the management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) published in the January 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology will be discussed in a webinar hosted by ARRS (2017-01-31)

Dual energy computed tomography angiography in the peripheral arterial imaging
This is a systematic review of 9 studies on the diagnostic applications of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in peripheral arterial disease. The systematic analysis of these studies represent the first summary of studies using DECT with regard to its diagnostic value, radiation dose and contrast medium dose. (2017-01-26)

Tiny exports signal big shifts in cancer tissue, researchers find
Microscopic shifts in metabolism and increases in tiny transport vesicles out of tumor cells preface larger changes to the tumor environment and could prepare the way for cancerous cells to spread and metastasize, University of Illinois researchers report. They saw cancer-causing biological events at both the molecular and tissue scales as they happened, imaging the cells with precise wavelengths of light -- no chemicals, dyes or genetic manipulation needed. (2017-01-25)

Images show cytofilaments linking cell nucleus to extracellular environment
New images are providing the first visual evidence of a long-postulated physical link by which genes can receive mechanical cues from its microenvironment. Created by integrating six different imaging techniques, the images show thread-like cytofilaments reaching into and traversing a human breast cell's chromatin-packed nucleus. (2017-01-25)

New class of materials could revolutionize biomedical, alternative energy industries
Polyhedral boranes, or clusters of boron atoms bound to hydrogen atoms, are transforming the biomedical industry. These manmade materials have become the basis for the creation of cancer therapies, enhanced drug delivery and new contrast agents needed for radioimaging and diagnosis. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has discovered an entirely new class of materials based on boranes that might have widespread potential applications, including improved diagnostic tools for cancer and other diseases as well as low-cost solar energy cells. (2017-01-25)

New avenue for anti-depressant therapy discovered
Researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. In so doing, they identified a new molecule that alleviates anxiety and depressive behavior in rodents. (2017-01-18)

World's first total-body PET scanner takes a big step forward
The UC Davis-based EXPLORER consortium, which aims to build a revolutionary total-body PET (positron emission tomography) scanner, has announced the selection of two industry partners to help build the prototype device. They are United Imaging Healthcare America, a North American subsidiary of Shanghai United Imaging Healthcare, and SensL Technologies of Cork, Ireland. (2017-01-17)

New technology enables 5-D imaging in live animals, humans
The technique developed by an international team of scientists is faster, less expensive and more accurate than current imaging methods that can identify signs of disease. (2017-01-12)

Manchester scientists tie the tightest knot ever achieved
Scientists at The University of Manchester have produced the most tightly knotted physical structure ever known -- a scientific achievement which has the potential to create a new generation of advanced materials. (2017-01-12)

Study first to connect stress-associated brain activity with cardiovascular risk
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai investigators has linked, for the first time in humans, activity in a stress-sensitive structure within the brain to the risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease. (2017-01-11)

Gravitational biology
Akira Kudo at Tokyo Institute of Technology(Tokyo Tech) and colleagues report in Scientific Reports, December 2016, that live-imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka fish transgenic lines lead to immediate alteration of cells responsible for bone structure formation. These findings are important for assessing the effects microgravity on long term human space missions. (2017-01-10)

Fear of diagnostic low-dose radiation exposure is overstated, experts assert
In an article published in the January 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers assert that exposure to medical radiation does not increase a person's risk of getting cancer. The long-held belief that even low doses of radiation, such as those received in diagnostic imaging, increase cancer risk is based on an inaccurate, 70-year-old hypothesis, according to the authors. (2017-01-09)

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